Open thread for Golden Hordes, Black Republicans, Lost Battalions, & Commies.

It’s yours, baybees….

Standard FYI clause: I generally wait about 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would typically open a thread (roughly noon, EST, back when such a thing was typical…!), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

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53 Comments

  1. All I really have today is the Face Off Recap: http://wp.me/p10bqa-2R2
    and How To Wear Pink High Heels over at ABLC: http://angryblackladychronicles.com/2012/09/05/how-to-wear-pink-high-heels/

    The weekend really took a toll on me. I feel seriously unwell. 3 more hours. Just three. and then I get to go home and stare at R’s work on TV all night again.

    • koolaide

       /  September 5, 2012

      passes anibundel more chocolate & chamomille tea

      hope your evening is soothing and you are able to rest & recover.

      • I feel really selfish that all I want is for R to f*cking come home. Especially since he is having a miserable time down there. The pre convention “Yes We Plan” gig was a complete disaster because of the double monsoon (he sent me a picture of them pouring a gallon of water out of each rental fixture with a question of just how much rice he should throw each one in to try and dry them out.) They’ve scrapped the outdoor thing on Thursday so there’s a huge scramble to strike everything that was already in there and figure out how to wing it with what they already have up at the indoor hall. and that’s not counting all the usual headaches of working in a security zone with demonstrators, packs of bike cops and Fox News all underfoot.

        • You can use all the Anglo-Saxonisms you want around here.

          God fucking damn it, they cannae take my swears away from me!

    • I saw your terrible, horrible, no good, very bad tale late yesterday – I’m so sorry! I hope the next three hours pass quickly and that you get a truly restful night’s sleep. Lord knows you deserve it.

      • The Vet visit yesterday for Purrbot and Marshmallow was the button on the weekend. I was there by myself, Purrbot on my lap, Marshmallow on the table next to me. Guy with two dogs taller and heavier than me comes out of the exam room. One comes up to sniff Marshmallow. She Spits hisses, growls and swipes at his nose in a total “bring it on! bring it on bitch!” attitude, trying to jump the carrier at him somehow. Guy gets upset with me because my cat is defending herself, and I don’t have her “under control” because my arms and lap are full of the shaking terrified one whose making crying noises from terror.

        Thank god the vet appeared and ushered me into the room at that moment, because just for that attitude I might have let Mitzi out to take his POS dogs on and teach them all what’s what.

        • caoil

           /  September 5, 2012

          I don’t understand that mindset of letting your animal go a-wandering and bother someone else’s pet. Our dogs were always on a short leash at the vet – Mishka would have been fine, but Kasi would’ve eaten just about anything. Why risk upsetting another animal?

          • Seriously, these dogs were larger than me. They walked up to a strange cat. What the hell did he EXPECT would happen?

  2. intangir

     /  September 5, 2012

    My dad, a long time Atlantic reader (I remember picking up copies as a kid and being totally put off by all the words!) visited over the weekend and mentioned that he had read TNC’s article about Obama and race. I didn’t get much of a chance to talk with him about it (hopefully next week when we’re on vacation together I can) but he mentioned that he really wanted to read more about Shirley Sherrod and her life experience. Were there any good long profiles done about her after she got fired? I found a few shorter pieces from WaPo and CNN but wondered if anyone knew of a longer piece.

    • koolaide

       /  September 5, 2012

      or where to find a good hair cuttery?

    • koolaide

       /  September 5, 2012

      more honestly, I’d like to hear more of his thoughts about the writers/opinion media folks who decide to ride the speaking circuit more than think/write new things. But I don’t know how to phrase that in the form of a cogent question. And it is not the most pressing thing at hand.

  3. David L

     /  September 5, 2012

    A couple weeks ago, I started to pick up Reason magazine’s web feed on my RSS reader. When they’re good, they’re good, but a depressingly large amount of it seems to be written by and for the Ron/Rand Paul wing of the Republican Party (in other words, there’s a lot of Democrat-bashing just for being Democrats and arguments that can be summed up as “The government should stay the hell out of my business, but you’re doing things I don’t approve of, so it should stop you.”)

    • intangir

       /  September 5, 2012

      Yeah I try to include some conservative voices on my RSS feed as well to try and make sure I’m not purely living in an echo chamber but it’s hard to find many that have substantial arguments without the sort of thing you mention (to say nothing of cries of socialist or birther nonsense). Conor Friersdorf, Sullivan, and, well, that’s about it right now. I’d love more suggestions from Horde members of conservatives they appreciate.

      • cofax

         /  September 5, 2012

        I just added Dan Larison from The American Conservative to my feed. Seems like a rational non-hating kind of guy.

        • efgoldman

           /  September 5, 2012

          Seems like a rational non-hating kind of guy.
          He is that kind of guy. And also writes clearly.
          Which is why, to today’s GOBP, he’s not even a mild annoyance.

      • Darth Thulhu

         /  September 5, 2012

        Daniel Larison and much of the broader group at theamericanconservative.com. The magazine will publish paleocons like Uncle Pat now and again, but by and large it isn’t trying to make money on the wingnut welfare circuit. They eviscerated the Republican Convention, and routinely lambast the radical free-wheeling of the Bush wars and general “big-government conservative” behavior.

      • I find Reihan Salam at the National Review to be usually thoughtful. Unfortunately his RSS feed is abbreviated so it’s often hard to tell the better pieces.

  4. Just for the record (for those who were on the OTAN yesterday), my dog CJ was quite stymied by the chain on her crate. I should have a month or so of peace before she figures out how to get the chain off.

  5. caoil

     /  September 5, 2012

    Has anyone read Susan Cain’s book “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking”? I’m partway through now and enjoying it a great deal. If you are an introvert, you will definitely recognize yourself in it.

    I’m pleased with the bits where she talks about the studies that have been done suggesting (in-person) collaborating, team-building, open-plan offices, meetings, public speaking and all those other extrovert things don’t actually work in the way managers want them to. It also reminds me that I need a more introvert-friendly job, though. I can’t do this forced talkativeness for much longer.

    • I know I’ve already sent this to you, but I must post it again for anyone else who might be interested:

      “Caring for your introvert” (interestingly enough, from The Atlantic, well before I cared about The Atlantic) – ’tis teh awesome: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2003/03/caring-for-your-introvert/302696/

    • mythopoeia

       /  September 5, 2012

      My officemates are by and large introverts, and when a manager suggested rearranging us to an open plan we all looked at each other and went “But how will we get any work done if we have no privacy? Or even the illusion thereof?”

      • JHarper2

         /  September 5, 2012

        My last manager moved me to a quiet office and moved a co-worker out onto the floor. His reasoning – JH will get more done when people aren’t bothering him all the time and (other guy) needs to be out where we can see him, so (other guy) will actually do something that he is supposed to be doing.
        With people, mileage varies.

    • Darth Thulhu

       /  September 5, 2012

      I read it when we started carrying it at work. It’s a good book of practical-level stuff … I liked the bits acknowledging how introverts adopt “pseudo-extrovert” masks, which comes up a lot in a bookstore (book people = introvert-heavy, store = sell!).

      I liked the history of the rise of extroversion-intensive business advice, but felt the contemporary stuff a bit too broad. Individual anecdotes and general tendencies are great, but it tried at times to one-size-fits-all the recommendations, when I know my pseudo-extroversion is much different in nature from my boss’s.

      As an awareness-raising book, close to peerless. As a recommendation guide, needs to be applied judiciously.

  6. Bookwoman

     /  September 5, 2012

    I just had a friend over for lunch, and she brought a cappuccino chocolate chip loaf for us to have for dessert. Clearly I should invite her over more often. Yum.

    • caoil

       /  September 5, 2012

      And then extract the recipe from her! 😉

      • Bookwoman

         /  September 5, 2012

        It was a from a bakery. A very, very good bakery.

        • caoil

           /  September 5, 2012

          Well, there goes that theory! Plan B is to get someone a job at that bakery, and infiltrate the kitchen…

      • helensprogeny

         /  September 5, 2012

        And then send some to me on the interwebs.

  7. JHarper2

     /  September 5, 2012

    Having a bad cold really sucks.

    So feeling sorry for myself for the past few days. Going away now to cough up a lung.
    On the other hand TNC liked one of my comments yesterday.

    • Darth Thulhu

       /  September 5, 2012

      That honor does have one floating around the room for awhile.

      Pray you feel better soon.

  8. koolaide

     /  September 5, 2012

    So, a small child of my close acquaintance had lice recently. I’m not incredibly paranoid & have what I hope is phantom itching. I’m “pretty sure” I wasn’t infected but that doesn’t stop the paranoia…

    • Bookwoman

       /  September 5, 2012

      Ah, memories. If you stay itchy, get a lice comb (very fine teeth) and run it through your wet hair, section by section. If you see nothing when you do this, you’re probably ok.

      If you are very paranoid, take some conditioner, glob it heavily all over/into your hair, and put on a shower cap. Wait a few hours (all day if you can), then rinse. (You can also use olive oil.) This will kill any live lice, although it won’t affect the nits, which requires a whole ‘nother level of attack.

      • koolaide

         /  September 5, 2012

        sigh. Yes, the nit comb and finding someone with time to go through my rather long hair. Did that 2 yrs ago when a different small child of my close acquaintance had lice and did, in fact, infect me. Children, massive disease vectors!

        Pretty sure the current itching is a bit of dandruf + paranoia. I think. or hope. or….

        I hadn’t thought of the shower cap/conditioner thing. Maybe I’ll do that tonight.

  9. stephen matlock

     /  September 5, 2012

    So I’m working out the next novel. I have the major characters in place, the general plot points and plot arc, and I’m almost ready to buckle down and start writing.

    I’m a bit nervous. I tackled some hard stuff in the last novel. I’m tackling harder stuff in this one.

    Goal is to have first draft done by end of November, 2nd draft by end of January 2013, and final edit complete by June 30th 2013. No title yet, but it’s 1957 and Henry has just slid into 3rd base on a sacrifice bunt by Joey, Peggy’s watching in the stands, Tommy’s returned from his tour of duty overseas, and Liana has moved back after a baby and a failed marriage, while the good Reverend H. Paradise Trueblood is about to lay the foundation for his radio Bible college in town…

  10. I just remembered I need to go get ticket to see Obama this Saturday (with luck!)

  11. efgoldman

     /  September 5, 2012

    A wonderful piece by Tom Junod on class and privilege, although you might not know it from these two delicious paragraphs”

    See, you have to wait in line when you go to Whitewater — or, for that matter, any other water park. It’s like Disney that way, or any of the other big amusement parks that traffic in the ability to wring screams from even the most jaded customers. The distinctive thing about waiting in line at Whitewater, however, is that you have to wait in line without any clothes on. You have to wait in line wet and semi-naked, in close proximity to hundreds of other wet and semi-naked people. That’s why the lines at Whitewater are not simply preludes to the Whitewater experience, not simply inconveniences to be endured before you go down a big blue slide that calls itself a “flume”: The lines at Whitewater are the experience. They’re a vision not just of democracy in action but democracy unveiled, a glimpse of what the last line is going to look like, when all is revealed, and we’re waiting for our interview with Saint Peter.

    And let me tell you, it ain’t pretty.

    I have seen some things, at Whitewater. I have seen the American enormity and I have seen — it almost goes without saying — enormous Americans. I have seen the obese, the augmented, the implanted, and the steroidal. I have seen boobs the size of butts, and butts the approximate size of bumper cars. I have seen stretch marks in geographic profusion, and every kind of scar, from every kind of delivery system — the sinkholes left by bullets, the crenellations left by knife, the apocalyptic lightning left by scalpel and surgical saw. I have seen people comparing scars, to while away the time. I have seen piercings in Babylonian profusion, and nail art in colors found not in the rainbow but rather in boxes of Froot Loops. And I have seen tattoos — oh, Lord, I have seen tattoos. I have seen devils and angels, Satan laughing and Christ Jesus weeping; I have seen people who have turned themselves into walking tombstones, sporting memorials for the dead, and the etched images of departed loved ones, both human and canine; I have seen soldiers who will never escape their inked dogtags, scholars and patriots with the Declaration of Independence written on their backs, and endless scrolls of text rendered illegible by time and known only to those who wear them on their skin. I have seen every form of erotic invitation and advertisement, not just tramp stamps but entire tramp field maps, and mothers of three and four and five with cobras and Tasmanian devils arising from their bikini bottoms. I have seen all the evidence I need that America, far from being a Christian nation, is at heart a pagan one, with democracy, at last, turning into a preference for the most personalized decoration.

    http://www.esquire.com/blogs/politics/whitewater-flash-pass-12403562