And what rough beast, its hour come round at last, / Slouches towards an Open Thread to be born

Sullying the good name of WB Yeats – that’s what I’m talkin’ bout!

Other than that, it’s yours….

Standard FYI clause: I generally wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

130 Comments

  1. So apparently getting really sick yesterday means that I missed the TNC OTAN and didn’t get to blog flog my awesome review of Brave.

    Remind me to be upset just as soon as I have some time.

  2. Are you deliberately contrasting Yeats view of the modern age with Mr. Sorkin’s? “The center cannot hold….”

    • Uhhh… yep. Totally what I had in mind. Sure. Why not?

      • dave in texas

         /  June 26, 2012

        Oh, good, because without the ‘toward Bethlehem’ I wasn’t sure if you were channelling Robert Bork and his ‘toward Gomorrah’ trope.

        Just kidding. I’d never put you alongside that crazy person. A differenet crazy person, maybe, but certainly not *that* one.

  3. I took the kinder to see Avengers again yesterday afternoon and a) IT SO STILL ROCKS and b) I had the stunning realization this morning that at least part of why I find the dashing Tom Hiddleston so very dashing is because he’s kind of the movie-version of my first great love.

    O_O

    • I’m just going to have to say it, even though all the twitterati and tumblrites dissent:

      I just don’t get what everyone sees in Tom Hiddleston. Meh.

      • koolaide

         /  June 26, 2012

        you’re not alone.

      • /swoons

        Even if he didn’t have this through line with a man I loved deeply for several years, I would still find him uber-attractive, because he’s just My Type: Tall, lanky, handsome but not too, angular but also a bit boyish around the edges, killer smile that lights up his eyes.

        Interestingly, the husband, who is The Great Love of My Life, answers only the second and fifth of that list — an excellent indication of the importance of “type” in life and in love.

        • I’d agree, but my wife is brown-haired, smart, and sarcastic, and that’s defintitely my type, so I guess it varies.

          • If memory serves, she’s also cute as a button, in ways both physical and conversational, so that didn’t hurt either, I’d imagine! : )

            • Well, yes, that helps more than a little.

              I should also say that I have dark hair and green eyes and that is (judging by exes) also very much her type.

        • David L

           /  June 26, 2012

          For me, it’s an absolute that you have to turn me on physically, but it’s possible to do that outside of my types*.

          * – I have two types–tall, lanky, and lean (think Michael Fassbender or Michael Phelps) and broad-shouldered of any height with some extra body fat over the muscle (hard to name a celeb who fits this type, but my best example right now would be Chris Hemsworth/Thor if he stopped worrying about what he eat).

          • I look like Chris Hemsworth if he stopped worrying about what he eats and also was pretty short and also was significantly less attractive in the face so I’m basically your type but I’m not gay so sucks for you.

            • Not to mention the whole “being married” thing.

              edit: WAIT. HOLD UP. I just realized that I unwittingly signed up to the whole “significantly less attractive in the face” thing, and while I will agree that you are not Thor, I protest! Dude, you’re cute. Deal with it.

            • PS I’ve suddenly been noticing, thanks to you, if movies are close-captioned or not, and I’ve been so pleased to see that most of the listings I’ve looked at recently (a decidedly small and very skewed sample) have had the little CC next to their name.

              FYI, etc, and so, I thought I’d share. Moar awareness being moar better, I figure.

        • snailspace

           /  June 26, 2012

          Ha, types. For years, I was all about the very tall, blond or light brown hair, boyishly skinny, boyishly-faced, clean-shaven, blue-eyed types whose hair might flop a bit into their eyes. YEARS, I tells ya. To quote Sara, nnnngggggghhhh.

          I married a guy with dark, curly hair, a black beard, and green-brown eyes, who’s only an inch or so taller than me and has a comfortable physique because he loves food and cooking as much as I do.

          So yeah, types. Ha, I say.

          (Our seven year wedding anniversary was yesterday.)

      • Cheekbones, eyes, skinny, 6’1.

        nnnngggggghhhh

      • cofax

         /  June 26, 2012

        Cheekbones. And scenery-chewing. And, I suspect, a pretty good sense of humor, based on the candids I’ve seen.

    • I still haven’t seen it.
      /nerdfail

      • I haven’t either. I’ll wait until I can see it second-run.

        • Ditto. Or HBO, should they be kind enough to pick it up.

          • I’m just going to say… I took the kids again yesterday because I REALLY wanted to see it on a big screen again. It really is that kind of movie.

            And in an aside: We saw it 3-D the first time, 2-D the second, and I don’t think I noticed the lack of that third D in any way, shape, or form (other than not having to fiddle with those damn glasses all the time).

  4. JHarper2

     /  June 26, 2012

    Effete Liberals are book commentating at TNCs Get in now when it is all about the hopeful early chapters.

    • I WILL NOT ADD EVEN ONE MORE BOOK TO THE PILE.

      This week.

    • Apparently I missed the discussion being moved to today, I thought it was Friday and I haven’t started Chapter 2 yet. Not that it matters, since I didn’t comprehend anything in the preface and not much of Chapter 1, and I am so exhausted I’m not comprehending much of anything.

      • JHarper2

         /  June 26, 2012

        Current schedule is up on the header of the discussion. Discussion might or might not help with comprehension. I just got my book copy yesterday afternoon, so was not able to give preface and ch 1 the in depth they deserved, did not tackle two at all, so I am behind out of the gate.

  5. I’m a bunny I’m a bunny I’m a bunny

    Hello! The sleep now? No. What! Boat boat boat. BEES.

    ——————-

    That is roughly how I feel. And it’s only Tuesday. TUESDAY. *weeps*

    • I really have no idea if this is any consolation, but I totally L’ed right out loud at this. So your pain serves me, at the very least.

      (I’m so sorry for your troubles!)

    • roll over on your back and see if Guybrush will pet your belly.

      • No, but he will stick his paw in the leftover whipped cream in the bottom of this bowl of berries, and then run all over my desk leaving sticky little footprints. Thanks, cat.

        • Yesterday when I went home i had wicked carb craving and ate a bowl of pasta and a single potato skin. somehow while I was not looking, the FatOne put his nose into the container of sour cream and licked it clean. His nose and whiskers on the other hand were covered.

  6. My brother is going to Comic Con. His first Comic Con in fact. How exciting.

  7. David L

     /  June 26, 2012

    A quick thought on the sidetrack about parents not talking to their gay children about relationships that the Morning Coffee thread at TNC’s place started to get into:

    A lot of the parts of a same-sex relationship are different (for one thing, both people having the same gendered baggage can be a source of conflict and an aid to empathy), but there are some things like the initial approach, treating your partner with human decency, and dealing with a break-up that are pretty universal. And it seems like gays and lesbians don’t get that because we end up hiding our relationships from our elders or they know/suspect something and assume that things are so very different that no advice will be helpful.

    • David L

       /  June 26, 2012

      Also, the phrase “gendered baggage” reminds me of this quartet I saw at the airport the other week. Two women, who looked similar enough that I figure they were probably sisters, accompanied by two men, who appeared to be their significant others. Both of the women had hot pink suitcases. Both of the men had navy blue suitcases. It kind of takes the phrase “gendered baggage” to its literal end.

      • Dex

         /  June 26, 2012

        As expectant parents, my wife and I are discovering that blue=boy and pink=girl thing is downright pathological. Almost every single person who asks if we know the gender of the child gets what I would describe as rage-filled and contemptuous when they realize we’ve left it as a surprise and they exclaim over and over: “I can’t believe you can do that. Well, I guess you realize that the only colors you can have now are yellow or green…” said in a tone that implies the child will end up horribly damaged as a result.

        To which, my response is: or white or grey or black or orange, red, brown, purple…

        • Or, you know, blue or pink as suits the parents, if you happen to like those colors.

          A friend of mine had a baby girl last December. One of her co-workers had an unused nursery set (she had bought it for a grandchild that ended up with two) that she was willing to sell for something like 10% of what it was worth. My friend was quite happy with that. But the co-worker kept profusely apologizing that it was a “boy” set. The crib bumper and changing table mat were sky blue, with brown trim.

          “Um, I like blue?” my friend tried. “Actually, the nursery has a lot of blue in it, it’s a good color for the room, and I’m pretty sure the baby’s going to be a girl no matter what color the crib is…”

          Apparently this caused ABSOLUTE FITS among her co-workers.

          I’ve already decided that while I”m perfectly happy to find out the sex of our future kids in advance, I will refuse to tell anyone. Because if I end up with a house full of gender coded crap before I even have kids I will go HULK SMASH.

          • There was this one time that we were travelling across the country with our roughly 8-month old baby boy who was dressed (if memory serves) in clothing that was on the boyish/neutral cusp — but he happened to have a pink pacifier.

            All that trip people referred to him as “her.” I thought I’d lose my shit.

            • aaron singer

               /  June 26, 2012

              My (currently 3.5 year old) nephew is rather adorable and has long, curly hair. He often gets called she.

              • chingona

                 /  June 26, 2012

                I had the same deal with my son. I learned to stop correcting people (if it was a store clerk or someone I wouldn’t be seeing again) because it would really freak them out.

                • koolaide

                   /  June 26, 2012

                  I’m annoying enough that I think I would enjoy the freaking out of strangers who are freaked out by getting a child’s gender wrong based on their silly assumptions about color-coding clothes/toys.

                  Also, too. I don’t have kids so you know. the fantasy would never be what I would really do in a situation.

                  • Dex

                     /  June 26, 2012

                    Heh. Someone wrote a parenting article last week offering a bunch of random parenting advice. Much of it was tongue-in-cheek, but some of it was sound (e.g., when people come to visit after the child is born, they’re there to see you and the kid;don’t worry if your place is a bit of a mess).

                    The favorite for both of us was something to the effect of: people will constantly ask you if your baby is good. Respond to them by saying: actually, s/he’s kind of an asshole.

                  • chingona

                     /  June 26, 2012

                    Sometimes, you just want to pay for your tampons and get out of Walgreen’s and don’t have the energy to deconstruct the patriarchy for this person.

                    • koolaide

                       /  June 26, 2012

                      I know the reality would be very different than my keyboard warrior-ing fantasy🙂 But sometimes people just…argh.

            • taylor16

               /  June 26, 2012

              People are so weird about gendering things. I have had probably about 10 people apologize – profusely – for misgendering my dog.

              Yes, my DOG. Trust me, she doesn’t care. Nor do I.

              • aaron singer

                 /  June 26, 2012

                I often forget/confuse the gender of friend’s dogs. Babies you can (often, not always) look at them at tell. But dogs?!

              • snailspace

                 /  June 26, 2012

                Yes! People will apologize for calling my dog a girl. I mean, he’s a greyhound, there’s no hair down there and his sex is kind of hilariously obvious. On the other hand, he has no balls and doesn’t speak English, so it’s not like he cares.

          • mythopoeia

             /  June 26, 2012

            “I’m pretty sure the baby’s going to be a girl no matter what color the crib is…”

            Oh, I love this!

          • taylor16

             /  June 26, 2012

            Last weekend I visited some friends in Michigan. They have a year-old daughter, and just moved into their new townhouse two months ago. They’re not planning to stay longer than a year before moving to a new place.

            When they showed me the baby’s room, they apologized for the fact that her room was blue. ????

            First, what do I care? Second, why would you paint a room in a house you’re only going to live in for one year?

            Third, the room was super-cute. Sheesh.

            • When I was 3 and my parents let me choose the color for my room, I went with lavender. At age 14 I got to pick new paint and I went with blue. And every time I’ve painted a bedroom since, it’s been some shade of blue and no-one’s batted an eye.

              So what, I wonder, makes it fashionable and stylish and decorative for a 12-year-old girl to sleep in a blue room, but inappropriate for an infant to do so??

          • efgoldman

             /  June 26, 2012

            I will refuse to tell anyone.
            I will help you duct tape your mouth, and bandage up your fingers in plaster so you can’t write or type.

            • efgoldman

               /  June 26, 2012

              The above reply was for K_Cox.
              FYWP!

        • koolaide

           /  June 26, 2012

          blue=boy and pink=girl thing is downright pathological.
          OMFG. YOU DO NOT LIE!!!

          Sorry for the all caps mini-rant, but that is totally one of my buttons for stupid current society. The pathological color coding seems soooo much worse the last 5-10 yrs than 20-30 yrs ago. But that might just be my skewed perspective.

          • caoil

             /  June 26, 2012

            Rage in all caps as much as you want. It’s good to share the load. Looking at little kid/toddler clothing makes me so, so angry.

            But I also get rage-face from the “boys toys” and “girls toys” labelled aisles at the grocery store.

            • &chik

               /  June 26, 2012

              I refuse to take the little one down the toy aisle at Target for exactly that reason. Well, that and I don’t want to have to say “no” 500 times when all I wanted was a giant box of toilet paper and some generic vitamins.

              But, yeah. For her birthday, littlest got a fire engine. In a desperate bid to avoid paying $50 for the Playmobil version, I went to Toys R Us one day. THE AISLES WERE PINK AND BLUE!!!!!! I cannot rage hard enough on this point. All of the pink stuff was dolls and toy vacuum cleaners. All of the blue stuff was guns and police cars.

              I ended up getting the Playmobil version from the expensive non-gendered toy store.

              • chingona

                 /  June 26, 2012

                I can’t remember how old your kiddo is, but a lot of older kids, whether because of peer stuff or identity-formation stuff, start to like more things associated with their gender. One thing I really like about Playmobil toys is that they have a lot of toys that could go either way and a lot of girl-oriented toys that are still active (per my complaint above). Like, lady veterinarian and stuff like that. (I really wanted to get it for my niece, who wants to be a vet, but it was $80 or something.)

                Also, their toys don’t make noise or light up. But that’s a rant for another day.

                • &chik

                   /  June 26, 2012

                  She’s a little over 3, and we’re starting to get some of that in our house. I calmly repeat my standard line “X is not just for girls/boys. X is for everybody who wants to play with it.” I’d say it works maybe 50% of the time, but I also understand that it is developmentally appropriate and not necessarily proof that I’ve failed as a progressive parent.

                  • chingona

                     /  June 26, 2012

                    That’s about when it started for us, and no, not a failure at all.

                • “Also, their toys don’t make noise or light up. But that’s a rant for another day.”

                  Heh. There’s a post-doc couple in my lab who have 1.5 year old twins. Last Christmas, some delightful friend got the kids a toy hammer that lights up and makes noise when you hit things with you. You can imagine how long it took for one of them to start hitting the other with the hammer.

        • Here’s a little something I wrote for the Trib Mpls Star-Tribune a few years back on my then-toddler and the color pink: https://emilylhauserinmyhead.wordpress.com/2009/07/29/threat-level-pink/

          HULK SMASH.

        • Dex

           /  June 26, 2012

          The Pink and Blue Project is what pushed me over the edge:

          http://www.jeongmeeyoon.com/aw_pinkblue.htm

          From the complete opposite direction, there’s this amazing story about Oliver’s Pink Bicycle (totally worth the listen):

          • A couple of weeks ago I saw a dude riding a bright pink road bike and sporting a dolphin ankle tattoo. The man was clearly comfortable with his masculinity.

        • osbenz

           /  June 26, 2012

          Pathological indeed. According to the ultrasound, resultant baby girl was supposed to be baby boy. Wife and I were soon awash in blue. As such, baby girl ended up wearing lots of blue (and bulldogs, baseballs, etc…). The outrage sparked from all manner of strangers was something to behold. Helluva world.

          • chingona

             /  June 26, 2012

            My second kid refused to give up the goods. We ended up having three ultrasounds for a variety of reasons, and at every one, she had her legs crossed with her heels firmly over her crotch and the umbilical cord right down the middle.

            That didn’t stop the ultrasound tech from printing out a picture with a little circle around the crotch. Really classy. We’ll use that one for the Christmas card.

            • osbenz

               /  June 26, 2012

              We just had the one ultrasound and it appeared very inconclusive. The lab tech thought she saw a penis and made the declaration. I informed everyone of the sketchiness to no avail. Because, everyone: “OMG, daddy’s firstborn is a son, YAY.” And ain’t no one wanna hear me: “umm, baby may well be a girl and I’m good with that too.”

              I delivered the bucketloads of comeuppance with relish.

        • Bookwoman

           /  June 26, 2012

          Do you know about Hanna Andersson? It’s pricey, but excellent quality and the clothes come in all sorts of colors. My kids lived in this stuff when they were small: http://www.hannaandersson.com/home.asp

          • chingona

             /  June 26, 2012

            I was given a few of things from this line, and I loved them and used them with both kids.

        • chingona

           /  June 26, 2012

          What gets me more than the colors is the themes. Little boys clothes always has active images – bears driving tractors, dogs driving fire engines, dinosaurs playing baseball, while girl clothes always has passive images – a flower, a butterfly, a cupcake. I would mind the pink a lot less if the kitty cat driving a truck or throwing a softball.

          That said, my daughter wears a lot of pink. I have a ton of hand-me-downs, and I use them.

          • aaron singer

             /  June 26, 2012

            I’m often at my sisters when she has kids with friends over to play with my nephew. Many of them are girls. Many of them play with his toys, trains/trucks/whatever. I just don’t understand a lot that gendered nonsense.

          • &chik

             /  June 26, 2012

            100% this. We get a lot of stuff from Osh Kosh and I end up buying boy shirts because all of the girl shirts say things like “Daddy’s Little Princess” (do not get me started on all the levels of wrong there), whereas the boy t-shirts say things like “Tougher than a T Rex.”

            I hate the assumptions that girls don’t like dinosaurs, or bicycles, or fire trucks.

            • taylor16

               /  June 26, 2012

              Most clothing for little girls that has words on it nearly sends me into a rage-stroke.

              Princesses, shopping, sweet/cute/dainty, pretty, aaaaauuughhhh. I don’t know how you parents with daughters deal with it.

              • Which is exactly why I bought my “Also I can kill you with my brain” shirt. When I ordered it, I had no idea that it was a Firefly quote – I just loved the notion of a woman walking around with those words emblazoned on her chest. Especially given that the chest in question is neither shy nor retiring and gets a lot of attention whether it wants the attention or not.

                I’m thinking of a “Self-Rescuing Princess” shirt for the girl’s birthday next month. She’ll rock it.

            • When my boy was about 4 or 5, he bemoaned the fact that girls got to wear pretty clothes and he didn’t. We talked about the fact that he could if he wanted to, but he didn’t want to that much. I think he just wished it were a socially acceptable option.

              Also, one of the reasons he liked to play at this one girl friend’s house because they would play Barbies (better news: They’re among each other’s best friends to this day).

              And in case you’re wondering, he’s pretty sure he’s straight. Straight boys sometimes like pretty, too, it turns out.

              • My youngest is like this. He likes pretty, sparkly, bright colors, big patterns. His father did, too. I think he’s going to start a hair band when he gets to high school.

            • osbenz

               /  June 26, 2012

              With you on this. Daughter gets a lotta clothes out the boys section.

          • chingona

             /  June 26, 2012

            Geez. Could my grammar be any worse in that comment? Sorry everyone.

        • chingona

           /  June 26, 2012

          Though, I have made the yellow/green comment. Actually, what I think I said is, “Hope you like ducks and frogs.” It’s meant more as a comment on the kids’ clothing industry than on the parents. Cats are girls. Dogs are boys. Frogs and ducks are neuter.

        • watson42

           /  June 26, 2012

          OMFG, don’t get me started. My sister and her husband didn’t want to know the sex of the child and I could not believe the pushback they got from people about how they wouldn’t be able to prepare if they didn’t know what to buy i.e. what color to use.

          I think I went to five toy & baby stores to find a white (not pink or blue) stuffed polar bear for my niece. And clothes….it seems like for newborns you can only buy either pink or blue. My sister is evil (that is, awesome) and in the newborn photos she sent out, the baby is in a striped pink swaddle and wearing a blue hat.

          • wearyvoter

             /  June 26, 2012

            My daughter wants to know boy or girl, because she likes to plan. Otherwise, she’s planning gender neutral decor. (She’s making up for my non-decor mindedness from her childhood. Our furniture theme here is still early hand-me-down.)

    • Well, this will teach me to skip the Morning Coffee thread just because it doesn’t give me a chance to trash Led Zep.

  8. “The Second Coming,” “Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy’s Day” and parts of “The Wasteland” are in a thre-way tie for most metal lyric poems ever. Great stuff.

    • aaron singer

       /  June 26, 2012

      And anything by Lovecraft?

      • Did he write poetry? I don’t imagine it would be very good. Unless you say his prose is so purple it has transcended itself and gone into another realm entirely…and I -like- his prose.

  9. &chik

     /  June 26, 2012

    I thought this NYT article as okay, in that it does a good job of explaining why 300 more homes in Beit El belies the Netanyahu government’s real intentions when it comes to a two-state solution. At the same time, I found all of the “and now they need to set up a new changing table” a bit much. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/27/world/middleeast/jewish-settlers-begin-evacuation-of-ulpana.html?hp

    Yeah, we get it. They have kids. That’s all very nice and humanizing, but I can’t help but note that it’s about 200 times more humanizing than any description the NYT is ever going to give us of their Palestinian neighbors.

  10. caoil

     /  June 26, 2012

    In the stuffing-it-to-HR department today: they decided last week to get all huffy about how there’s no one in our dept at 7:30 anymore (hasn’t been for over four years, people are rather used to it by now), and they’re getting “all” these “complaints” about how there’s no service, blah de blah, so this morning I’ve gone through all my completed email jobs for the past 6 months (and deleted stuff too, in case someone else handled it) and written out exactly what days early jobs have come in, and exactly what time, and whether the office in another time zone sent it. I hope it will put this stupid ghost story to rest when we present them with actual data. I think I’m bitter. Am I bitter?

    Unrelated to my work, but work nonetheless, is anyone out there a (text)book editor in need of a job? UBC is hiring…

    • HR is immune to data.

      Sorry.

      • caoil

         /  June 26, 2012

        Probably, since they’re in love with their own stories. But at least I’ll have done my part to try to counteract the crazy.

  11. chingona

     /  June 26, 2012

    It started raining here and applause actually broke out in the newsroom. Five minutes later, it’s over. We’re looking at our fourth straight 100-degree day here, which would not have been remarkable when I lived in Tucson, but is record-breaking here. We have multiple wildfires burning with almost no containment. It is not shaping up to be a good summer.

    • chingona

       /  June 26, 2012

      And now we have something like three or four grass fires going – presumably sparked by lightning.

      • David L

         /  June 26, 2012

        And here we have the heat causing power lines to sag so low that they get snagged by passing vehicles, causing sparks that start grass fires.

        /large

    • Over the weekend, we had a wildfire on the freakin’ Eastern Shore. The Shore is halfway underwater to start with, and the better part of a county is on fire.

      Hopefully Debby will stop by this weekend.

    • taylor16

       /  June 26, 2012

      Not like it comes anywhere close to what Colorado is going through, but here in southern Indiana we haven’t had a drop of rain in more than 30 days. The northern parts of the state have accumulated something like 0.25 inches all month.

      I’m starting to get really scared of fireworks season around here.

      • chingona

         /  June 26, 2012

        Lack of rain can be a bigger deal in climates that are not drought-adapted. Colorado is high desert, though you wouldn’t know if from the lawns. Well, maybe now you can, but you get the idea.

      • Whereas Oregon has had exactly the opposite. The first two weeks of June saw more rain than we usually get in the whole month. Climate change: it is totally a thing

    • We should swap a bit. My boss was complaining today about how it’s the end of June and it’s still raining. I’m perfectly sanguine with this state of affairs.

  12. dmf

     /  June 26, 2012

  13. dmf

     /  June 26, 2012

    wow sorkin’s new pilot was bad, i’m not expecting a documentary just good writing/acting and this was very disappointing on all accounts. hope it can build into something worth watching.

    • Sorkinisms – A Supercut:

      O_O

      • dmf

         /  June 26, 2012

        nice thanks, i have been a fan and hope to be again but i’m not sure that jeff daniels can help but over act, maybe too much time on the stage? that said sam waterston has no excuse and really the writing was like a bad sitcom gone earnest.

      • Oh that is delightful. Does it end with a rousing sing-along of the score of the HMS Pinafore?

  14. THE POWER OF TWITTER: BEHOLD.

    Last Friday I had a terrible customer experience with Sears. The microwave my defacto inlaws bought us was broken out of the box and attempting to get a repairman was apparently futile, despite the deluxe warranty that came with it.

    The experience on the phone was so traumatizing I tweeted about it.

    Monday morning I get an email from Sears executive level customer care, asking if they can call me. they saw my tweet and they are very sorry I had such a terrible time. They want to set it right ASAP.

    I now have a repairman set to come at the end of the week.

    • David L

       /  June 26, 2012

      I’ve never quite understood why it is that companies are so quick to attempt to make it right if you complain on Twitter when I could stand on a street corner and wave a placard around about how much I hate Sears and they would probably never know.

      • Because your street-corner irritation is unlikely to go viral and be picked up by millions within 24 hours. One tweet, if popular enough, can do extraordinary amounts of damage to a company’s public image. Basically it’s better service through implicit blackmail. (And with some companies, that’s what it takes.)

    • Good for them.

      Did you give them a good Tweet as follow-up?

  15. dmf

     /  June 26, 2012

    http://www.againstthegrain.org/program/541/id/122326/mon-3-26-12-revolt-and-revolution
    What does revolution mean to movement elders Grace Lee Boggs and Angela Davis? What should it encompass, and whom should it involve? Boggs and Davis spoke recently in Berkeley. And Daniel Rasmussen tells the story of the largest slave revolt in US history, which took place in 1811 in and around New Orleans.

  16. Oh, I almost forgot, there’s a new teaser trailer for the film event of the decade.

    0:23-0:45 is so great. I have a semi-chubby just thinking about it.

  17. efgoldman

     /  June 26, 2012

    Hey Craig!
    I posted this story for you last week, but I don’t think you were around that day.

    A federal judge in Massachusetts has denied Netflix Inc.’s request to throw out a lawsuit brought by the National Assn. for the Deaf, which alleges that the service discriminates against the deaf and hard of hearing by failing to provide closed captioning on all of the movies and TV shows available through its Internet streaming service.

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-netflix-closed-captioning-20120625,0,2349779.story

    • I guess not, that’s news to me. We’ll see where it goes moving forward. Personally, I’m much more frustrated by the current lack of access to first-run movies, I’d love to sue the shit out of Regal for the horseshit games they play with accessibility.