For the Horde! An open thread.

Callin’ it, you know what to do, have at it, its yours, etc, and so on….

Standard FYI clause: My rule of thumb is that I wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

106 Comments

  1. caoil

     /  May 30, 2012

    If any of the West Coast Horde (or anyone else, for that matter) is planning to travel upwards to Vancouver and environs this summer, let me know – I’m in the midst of planning a bunch of outings and I would be glad to include you in anything you’d be here for.

    • Waaaaaaaaaaaaaah!

      • caoil

         /  May 30, 2012

        I know. I think your kids (and you!) would have a blast.

        • Me, me, me! Who cares about the dang kids? (But really: No bats. I don’t care how cute and/or cool they may be. NO BATS).

          • caoil

             /  May 30, 2012

            LOL! You would enjoy the meteor shower, though. And…our aquarium just got some penguins, so there’s that.

            • helensprogeny

               /  May 30, 2012

              (OT, but I was thinking about you this morning. I just managed to watch the final episode of Awake. A little disappointing.)

              • caoil

                 /  May 30, 2012

                Did you read the interview I linked last night? Killen talks a bit about how that was always their intended ending for s.1. I’m sad it’s going, but in a way if it had to end, I don’t mind this vague setup. There are a host of ways you could interpret it, outside of what the writers meant by it.

                • helensprogeny

                   /  May 30, 2012

                  Completely missed the link from last night! Yeah, I did appreciate it that at least they tied up so many of the story lines. I hate to be left hanging. But I really thought either a) they would both be dead or 2) he would be in a coma or something. Off to see link!

                  • caoil

                     /  May 30, 2012

                    Side note: in the bit where he was walking down the hallway with his two psychiatrists, I turned to my g/f and said “Hey! Both his psychs are gay!” Kind of an interesting coincidence in the casting, there.

                    • helensprogeny

                       /  May 30, 2012

                      Oooh, had no idea. Very interesting indeed. And that was such a great scene too. Imma miss that show!

    • NealH

       /  May 30, 2012

      Was actually just up at Whistler last weekend with short stops in Vancouver on the way up and back (though the stop on the way up was unappreciated–an hour and a half to go about 2-3 km because the inbound tunnel on Friday afternoon was only one lane–what’s up with that?). I love Seattle and environs, but Vancouver, Whistler and the surrounding area just kick it up a notch. Simply fantastic.

      • caoil

         /  May 30, 2012

        If you’re travelling up again, and have AM radio, dial into 730 or 1130 (730 is constant traffic updates, 1130 has news but then traffic every ten minutes). Especially in the late afternoon, it can get hairy quite quickly.

      • Because all the Canucks were headed south to shop in Blaine. Seriously, avoid the tunnel and take the Alex Fraser Bridge. The routing is convoluted, but quicker.

  2. Les Mis and GoT Trailers Plus Nigel Swears he doesn’t care who wins Idol, and NBC continues to ruin singing shows for the rest of TV.
    http://anibundel.wordpress.com/

    Also, your Fozzie Joke of the Day. Does Sean Bean ever catch a break?

  3. Oh and for those following the saga, the HotDog remains were discovered last night.

    • socioprof

       /  May 30, 2012

      We need deets! Which kitteh had them?

      • We suspect FatOne is the culprit who took them from the kitchen. There were, after all, six HotDogs in the bag, and that’s pretty hefty for a cat under 10lbs. Trouble is 11-12lbs , so she might have done it, but we think it was most likely him, as she would have more likely knocked them to the ground in the kitchen and ripped into the bag right there.

        The HotDog remains were found upstairs in my sewing room. The bag itself (which was ripped to shred) and the remains of three dogs were behind the the clothing bin under my work table. The reason I discovered them was two more hotdogs (which were not ripped to shreds) had been rolled out from under said table. they looked to have been thoroughly licked, and the ends worried by teeth, but whichever cat it was trying to eat them was defeated by the round tubular shape. We suspect this was Purrbot, as she likes wet food and turkey, but she’s smaller than either Trouble or FatOne and would have had more trouble getting her mouth around the dog to bite it. Also she’s not very bright, so rolling things would have confused her.

        Once again, I reiterate that Marshmallow is in the clear. Also, His Cat is most likely not involved, as she’s a pretty picky eater; does not go in my sewing room, since it doesn’t smell right and in general R insists she must be innocent. I’m not going to fight him on that. Pick your battles.

    • Bob Jones' Neighbor

       /  May 30, 2012

      Details! We need gross details!! The grosser the better – although given how few days have elapsed, maybe not. But if you want to exaggerate, we’ll enjoy it all the more.

      • Gross details…the two rolled hotdogs were covered in carpet fuzz? The ground up bits left over were hard to get out of the carpet? It took turning on the vacuum to drive Trouble and FatOne away from licking the carpet to pull out the hotdog bits?
        The Hotdog left in the bag looked to be just fine?

        • taylor16

           /  May 30, 2012

          This didn’t make them sick? That’s amazing.

          One piece of ham had my 100-pound Rottweiler spewing from both ends so profusely that I don’t even keep ham in the house anymore.

          I can’t even imagine what hotdogs would do to her. Blecchhh.

          • Turkey dogs. Not pork.

          • chingona

             /  May 30, 2012

            My totally anecdotal experience is that dogs will eat anything, even though many of them actually have pretty sensitive stomachs and suffer nasty consequences. Most cats don’t eat things that will make them sick. Their puking is just random puking, but if something is not fit to eat for them, they just don’t eat it.

            • My supervisor claims her dog has a ‘girlish tummy’. He once ate a single goldfish cracker and then puked 3 times, so I can’t disagree.

            • taylor16

               /  May 30, 2012

              Yeah, I can see this. Although our Rottie does seem to be at least somewhat sensitive to food – she will sometimes smell something and then refuse to eat it. Once I encouraged her to “go ahead and eat it!” and she had one bite of the treat and puked everywhere.

              So she seems to be a bit aware of her limitations, along the lines of Gonzai55’s boss’s dog. Ham is apparently a weakness for her.

              • chingona

                 /  May 30, 2012

                It’s a weakness for a lot of people, too.

    • chingona

       /  May 30, 2012

      Last night, I got home late and had a few slices of cheese as a snack. (Cheese probably is my great food vice.) I didn’t want to put it away right away because I thought I might want a little more. I nearly left it where it was, but then the dog walked past and looked up. I pushed the cheese to the back of the counter and put my purse and some other random things around it to shield it from theft.

      And yes, we need details. Weren’t the hot dogs in the fridge? Do your cats have opposable thumbs?

      • R thinks I didn’t actually put them in the fridge, but somewhere between wrapping them in the ziplock bag I got distracted and left them on the counter.

      • My cats have been known (and I’ve witnessed it) to almost turn doorknobs completely to open them. Otherwise they push on them hard enough that the force will cause the door to bounce back and open just enough for them to get through. It seems for some cats, thumbs are optional.

        • For the record, those “fire safe” handle knobs? FatOne and Trouble are both long enough in body that they can stretch up and pull down the handle. trouble knows what she’s doing when she does this. FatOne hasn’t quite put it together, he just knows sometimes when he stretches tall and throws himself against the door, it pops open.

    • katryzna

       /  May 30, 2012

      Once upon a time, my mom put a bowl of sloppy joe mix on the table and then left the room to answer the phone. She returned to find our golden retriever sitting in a dining room chair, licking the empty bowl.

      • Once upon a time, I came home from school, took one look at our English Setter and called up the stairs to my sister: “Did you give Annie a new bone?”

        And she yelled down: “Is there a ham steak on the kitchen counter?”

  4. DC Horde Meetup June 16th on Old Town’s waterfront. Email me if you want a map of where we’re meeting.

  5. Captain Button

     /  May 30, 2012

    Fish!

    Today’s fish is Trout à la Crème. Enjoy your meal.

    • David L

       /  May 30, 2012

      And later in that episode, one of my favorite lines from Cat: “Food escape!”

    • God I love that show. Danny John-Jules channels actual cats so well it’s uncanny.

      • Captain Button

         /  May 30, 2012

        I never watched the post-Starbug-only season(s), is it worth it?

        • Season 7 is O.K., but not my favorite. Season 8 didn’t do anything for me, because I just didn’t like the “oh, now the rest of the crew of Red Dwarf is alive and all of the main characters are in jail” setup. I get that they wanted to do something different, but it just didn’t click for me.

  6. mythopoeia

     /  May 30, 2012

    I’m still bowled over by how magnificent Nina Simone is and how I managed not to know this until a few months ago. Example A: I Put A Spell On You.

  7. taylor16

     /  May 30, 2012

    Has anybody here had any experience with labrynthitis or vestibular neuritis or other inner ear inflammation issues?

    After feeling weird and sort of “off” for the past 4-5 days, I woke up with the room spinning this morning. Went to the doctor, got some reassurance that I’m not having a stroke (whew), and am now home on the couch, trying to keep the room from spinning any more than it already is.

    The doctor prescribed some antivert (which I already took) and an antihistamine/antinausea med that I’m too scared to take since my husband isn’t home and I’m not nauseous anyway. But they think it’s a viral inflammation of my inner ear, so there was nothing else they wanted to do for now other than to tell me to “try to relieve the symptoms and wait it out.” Which could take another few days or even weeks.

    So … anyone have any home remedies or anything for dealing with/relieving vertigo? I’ve got 8-10 hours to kill until my husband is home, and I’m already over this whole dizzy/spinning thing. I feel like I’m drunk, but not in a fun way.

    Also, thanks for the OTAN, Emily. I need one today!!🙂

    • Ian

       /  May 30, 2012

      Dude. I’m home sick, too. I think it’s hantavirus. My wife’s in Houston for the week, so I’m taking care of six dogs while dying of hantavirus.

      • taylor16

         /  May 30, 2012

        *googles hantavirus*

        Okay, you win.🙂

        Seriously, I sometimes think that the worst illnesses/conditions (to me) are the ones where you don’t really *feel* sick but just have something that hampers your normal daily activities. I feel basically fine today, until I try to move. And I’m not confident in my ability to lay completely still for the next 3 days and not lose my mind.

        • Ian

           /  May 30, 2012

          No, yours is worse. I don’t really have hantavirus. I had some contact with rodent feces and then I developed flu-like symptoms, so I spent some time on the internet reading about leptospirosis and hantavirus, but deep down I know I don’t have either. Your thing sounds terrible. I hate being stuck in bed more than pretty much anything.

        • “Until I try to move” – not to be one, but that’s quite a limitation.

          I hope it clears up quickly & your husband is home very soon!

    • katryzna

       /  May 30, 2012

      I had a viral infection in my ear. I had a cold. When I woke up in the morning, I sat down on the toilet and promptly fell off. It went away in about a week. Sleeping/laying on the floor was about the only thing that helped.

      • taylor16

         /  May 30, 2012

        Yeah, I’m thinking that there won’t be much that can be done. I just keep *forgetting* that I feel like this, and then I do something stupid like turn my head quickly to the left or stand up too quickly. And then I remember.

        I just tried to stand on one foot, just testing. I could do it! Then I shut my eyes and listed so violently to the left that I slammed into the wall with my shoulder.

        I’m done experimenting with the vertigo now.

    • dmf

       /  May 30, 2012

      I often get inflammation in my ears and I’m afraid there isn’t really much to do except try and make sure that you slow down your movements and if possible your breathing so you don’t spook yourself and get that yucky panicked feeling.

      • taylor16

         /  May 30, 2012

        Thanks. I’m trying to move slowly, but that’s not something that comes naturally to me.😦

        Luckily, I’m not panicking or anxious. Since it came on kind of slowly over a few days I’ve had time to adjust to it and none of it is taking me by surprise.

        I can’t say I’ll feel the same way if it doesn’t clear up in a few days, though.

        • dmf

           /  May 30, 2012

          that’s good sometimes when the body feels like it’s reeling that can be upsetting so slo-mo can be key, most peoples’ clears up sooner than later and I’m sure that yours will too, mine is part of a wider problem with inflammation so I’ve just had to learn to take it as it comes, ever onward…

    • watson42

       /  May 30, 2012

      There’s not a lot you can do except ride it out. And move slowly. I have found some head positions help – when it has happened to me, I could only sleep completely flat, facing up, or with my head looking 45 degrees to one side. It helped keep the vertigo at bay.
      Oddly, the smell of mint helped a little. Maybe it just helped me relax. But it did help.
      Avoid visual meda that has a lot of rapid jump cuts. 🙂

      I hope this goes away quickly! Vertigo sucks.

    • Yeah, I’ve had that a couple of times. Nothing helped me but staying in bed with my eyes closed. I could listen to things, but I couldn’t read stuff or watch stuff. Took about 2 or 3 days for it to pass.

      The most difficult part? Being driven to the doctor. The movement of the car had me at the point of vomiting most of the way.

    • lasslisa

       /  May 31, 2012

      Had that happen to me once (for only a few hours), vertigo with nausea when I tried to move, and for whatever reason the anti-nausea meds just absolutely fixed the vertigo. That said, the doctor I visited kept using terms like ‘psychosomatic’ and ‘anxiety attack’, plus I did actually have nausea, so it’s certainly a different root cause at work.

  8. dmf

     /  May 30, 2012

  9. chingona

     /  May 30, 2012

    There was a discussion in yesterday’s OTAN about ogling and catcalling and all that, and the conversation went to the very young age at which many girls first start to experience unwanted or confusing attention from men – too often from adult men. As I thought back on my own teenage years and various experiences, I felt really embarrassed about how passive I was in the face of some of the things I experienced. Not so much guys who yelled stuff from cars – because, seriously, what are you going to do? – but stuff that got physical, stuff where people invaded my space. Often, it took the reaction or intervention of a third party to help me see that I didn’t have to and shouldn’t just put up with this stuff. I would say that my dominant feeling toward these incidents even today – even as a fucking feminist who does not believe that sexism is like the weather, something we can’t change and just have to endure – is not anger at the men who did those things but shame at my own passivity.

    My own mother did not really talk to me about this aspect of being female in public. Much later, she told me a few of her own stories, but I had been experiencing these things for years by the time she brought them up. Looking back, I think if my mother had talked to me about these things, I might have felt more prepared, might have thought through more what I would do. At the same time, I’m not sure what she should have said. I suspect she wanted to me to be confidant and feel that the world was open to me. Mostly, I think that was a good thing. Mostly, I think she succeeded. If she had talked to me more explicitly about sexism and the male gaze and objectification, would that have made me more fearful or cautious? I think it’s a really tough balance.

    I’m curious what messages other people got from their parents about catcalling, objectification, workplace sexual harassment, etc. and what messages people try to give their own daughters.

    • Lizzou

       /  May 30, 2012

      My parents never went there with me. Not one peep. Whatever I learned to expect or how to behave was picked up from watching other people and reading books. I lived a sheltered life as a teen, so I was seriously traumatized when I first encountered (up close and personal) a strange, older man feeling me up on the metro in Rome. It took me weeks to recover emotionally. My reaction was to be aggressively defensive towards other men for the remainder of my trip (6 months).
      At the same time, I was lucky to have really great relationships with older men (uncles, my bosses, professors), who became dear friends – they seriously impressed on me my worth and how to react with class. Also – to brook no a**holery.
      If I have daughters, I expect myself to have the talks with her that my parents never did.

    • SWNC

       /  May 30, 2012

      Interesting question. First of all–I would say there is absolutely no need to feel ashamed of not being more assertive or aggressive in confronting harassers as a teenage girl. Hell, as a teenage girl it was hard for me to ask a store clerk for help, let alone confront a creepy perv who was invading my space. I honestly think that’s why these assholes target girls more so than grown women–they know that the girls are more vulnerable and less likely to speak up.

      Starting when I was around 12, my mom and my aunts starting telling me stories about when they’d been harassed or touched inappropriately: the family friend who would pinch their bottoms, the skeevy professor who kept asking my aunt out while she was in his class; the leering boss; the guy who tried to rape my mom after a date (my words in retrospect, not hers.) The messages I took away–which I’m pretty sure were also the messages they meant to impart–were that strange men can’t be trusted; you always need to let a girlfriend know where you are and when you’re coming back; you shouldn’t walk alone at night; you may have to quit a job because of harassment; etc. I know that they were trying to protect me, but in some ways their stories made me more fearful.

      As for my own daughter…. Lord, I don’t know. I want her to feel strong and confident in her own body. I want her not to be afraid of men. (Okay, what I really want is for her to be a superhero who can blast anyone who catcalls or threatens her through a brick wall.)

    • David L

       /  May 30, 2012

      On the opposite side, I never got the talk about not catcalling or the like, although I’m pretty sure it wouldn’t have been tolerated if I had. If my sister ever had a specific talk, it either happened when I was around or I’ve forgotten about it.

      I remember that we had a pretty frank talk about sexual harassment when the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearings were going on, even though I couldn’t have been older than 10.

    • Electronic_Neko

       /  May 30, 2012

      I don’t recall either of my parents, or other adults in my life, ever directly saying anything about how to handle negative attention from men. What I absorbed at home and school was more directed at keeping yourself safe by staying in a group, not going places after dark, etc.

      I had one experience in college where an older man put his hands on me in a situation where I would have expected to be safe. My room mate and I were taking the bus to a club late on a Thursday night. We ended up sitting by a guy who was seemed to be passed out. He woke up and started talking to us – to me, really. It was pretty clear once he sat up that he was probably drunk and that he had probably been in a fight – his face was bloody. At one point he put his hand on my knee. I completely froze. I was expecting the other men sitting behind us in the bus or the bus driver to speak up and tell him to back off. Finally my room mate told the guy I was her girlfriend and he needed to take his hands off me and leave us alone.

      Like you said, chingona, I was really upset at myself for being so passive. I knew that I didn’t have to put up with strangers touching me, and I would have said prior to that experience that I could tell someone to leave me alone, no problem. I ended up telling my mom about it, and her response was to scold me for taking risks by getting on the bus so late. I spent most of my teenage years struggling with acne and depression. I was also on the fringe socially and didn’t spend a lot of time hanging out with people outside of class. I was aware of sexual harassment and objectification, but I had never expected to experience it personally. I didn’t think of myself as a sexual being, so I was not expecting anyone to approach me like that. I spent a lot of time berating myself for making a bad choice by sitting anywhere near that guy, but it honestly did not occur to me that it might be an issue. That might also be a reason no one talked to me about it.

  10. Ian

     /  May 30, 2012

    Doc takes this at a very slow tempo, so you have to be in the right mood to listen to it through. I love his a cappella recordings, and this one is fitting. Taylor16, try to ignore the line about meeting the contagion and sinking to the tomb:

    And here’s a fun one:

    • SWNC

       /  May 30, 2012

      RIP, Doc. He was a great man and a great musician. What a loss.

      • Ian

         /  May 30, 2012

        Remember what music was like in the 80s? I mean, if you only had access to MTV and mainstream radio? I first heard Doc Watson at Newport in 1988, and honestly I’d had no idea there were living people playing music that sounded like that. Of course I thought I was hearing something ancient and authentic, but that’s not what it was. Doc should be remembered more as an innovator than as a traditionalist. His guitar styles and song interpretations were his own, and they came from a lot of disparate sources including records and people he met on the folk circuit. It’s all rooted in the music he heard and played at home, but if you could go back to his early home life, you wouldn’t find anyone who sounded like him.

        • JHarper2

           /  May 30, 2012

          Doc did try quite hard to to do the trad stuff in the old way, but he would be the first to tell you that he incorporated all kinds of music in his repertoire. He did try to do each type of music in its own way, but with his talent and his mastery of so many kinds of music overlap was inevitable. The first song posted is done is a very trad style, the slow tempo is typical of that style as found in the old field recordings. He learned from family and recordings until he could reproduce the sound and playing accurately, but he did later sometimes “make it his own” as great musicians always do.

          He was as good as he was due to practice and perfectionism. One time when I saw him the sound tech was having a terrible time getting the stage mix right, and Doc was not pleased. He wanted the best for himself and his audiences.
          Interesting NY Times Obit here.
          http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/30/arts/music/doc-watson-folk-musician-dies-at-89.html?_r=1&hpw

          • Ian

             /  May 30, 2012

            It would have been weird to see Doc Watson angry.

            I think you can get a real good idea of where he was coming from by listening to the old “Doc Watson Family” album, which is really great. I agree–the first performance I linked is straight church singing. His father was the song leader in his church, and I believe “Lone Pilgrim” was his favorite. Deep River Blues, though, is kind of a Merle Travis plus Doc Watson arrangement, and you won’t find anything earlier that sounds like it. A lot of his fingerpicking carries a strong Mississippi John Hurt influence without sounding like Hurt. And a lot of it doesn’t. He had so many different ways he could approach a song, but it all sounds consistent rather than eclectic.

  11. WHY DOES NO ONE IN THE DEVELOPMENT PIT KNOW HOW TO WORK A GORRAM PRINTER??

    • I don’t know.

      But I think it’s “gorramn.”

      Ahem. Good luck with that!

      • Well, I’d have corrected it (along with my typo below of 8.4×14 except there’s NO EDIT BUTTON.

        • DO I LOOK LIKE MR. WORDPRESS TO YOU?

          I’ll fix the other one for you, but here, I’m afraid your ignorance will have to stand.

          (I’ve going down to the UChicago campus to do research lately & wore my “Also I can kill you with my brain” shirt one day – a young lady stopped me and flashed me with her “Curse you and your sudden by inevitable betrayal” shirt. BROWNCOATS HELL YEAH).

          • IT WASN’T IGNORANCE IT WAS A TYPO.

            /ahem.

          • caoil

             /  May 30, 2012

            I envision Mr. WordPress looking a little bit like Mr. Peanut. That’s probably a bit weird, right?

            • JHarper2

               /  May 30, 2012

              Like a walking 19th century press, with handles for arms, and little elves looking out through the complicated gearing, sneering at the commenters.

              • caoil

                 /  May 30, 2012

                *sigh* If I had drawing ability I’d take that description & turn it into something…

  12. Captain Button

     /  May 30, 2012

    The Development Pit? A Gorranm Printer?

    Now I’m picturing some kind of nerd-Dante Cyber-Hell.

    • I literally found all three of them standing around the printer wondering why it was jamming.
      It was jamming because they had 8x14in paper in the tray, but the tray guides set to 11×17.
      When I started to fix it, one says “but then it refuses to print because it says we have the wrong size paper in there.”

      Oh.
      My.
      God.

      • JHarper2

         /  May 30, 2012

        There’s a hole in the bucket, dear liza, dear liza
        Then fix it dear henry
        With what shall I fix it, Dear Liza
        With Straw, dear Henry
        With what will I cut it, dear liza
        With the ax, dear henry
        The ax is too dull, dear liza
        Then sharpen it dear henry
        With what will I wet it, dear liza
        With water, dear henry
        With what will I fetch it, dear liza
        In the bucket, dear henry
        There’s a hole in the bucket, dear liza, and the copier is jammed if you could fix that too,

  13. David L

     /  May 30, 2012

    It’s OT for the thread at TNC’s place, so I’ll say this here: I would just like to say that the Clementi/Ravi case and the discourse around it pushes so many of my buttons.

    It’s as much philosophical as it is anything else. I’m a big believer in intentions when it comes to moral/ethical/legal transgressions, and it’s really tough to inject the kind of nuance I want to bring to that sort of thing into such an emotional topic.

    • dmf

       /  May 30, 2012

      nuance and comment threads of that size audience don’t really go together especially when there is so much room for speculation the the dreaded tendency for mind-reading in these cases.

  14. dmf

     /  May 30, 2012

  15. Rand-Along Update: Once its third act kicks in, Atlas Shrugged looks a lot like a Left Behind novel, with John Galt replacing Jesus Christ.

    I’m making my way through The Speech, which I still can’t believe actually exists, all 60 pages of it, to serve as a dramatic climax of a novel.

    • dmf

       /  May 30, 2012

      did you lose a bet?

    • Bookwoman

       /  May 30, 2012

      Atlas Shrugged looks a lot like a Left Behind novel, with John Galt replacing Jesus Christ.

      I love this comment so much I can’t even tell you.

  16. carlosthedwarf

     /  May 30, 2012

    Shit, you guys. I accidentally started an oatmeal thread in the facebook horde. Please accept my most sincere apologies.

    • Bob Jones' Neighbor

       /  May 30, 2012

      Oatmeal is never an accident (although I have had accidents while preparing oatmeal…)

    • helensprogeny

       /  May 30, 2012

      Well, acupuncture for you, my friend!

      (Also too, I find your oatmeal methods entirely acceptable. Though I’m concerned about the savory bit.)

      • carlosthedwarf

         /  May 30, 2012

        Some of my foodie friends swear by savory oatmeal.

        • chingona

           /  May 31, 2012

          I did savory oatmeal, and I liked it. I kind of made it fancy by cooking some vegetables (cabbage, mushrooms, onions) in sesame oil in the bottom of the pan before adding the oatmeal and water. While that cooked, I fried up an egg and put the egg on top, with yolk still runny, so when you cut into it it runs all over your oatmeal. Seasoned with soy sauce and hot sauce.

    • Ian

       /  May 30, 2012

      Tried to change the subject for you. We’ll see if it takes.

    • chingona

       /  May 30, 2012

      Remind me again how I get in on this Facebook thing. I don’t waste enough time on the Internet.

      • helensprogeny

         /  May 30, 2012

        Taylor16 can probably help you out with it when her head stops spinning.

      • taylor16

         /  May 30, 2012

        Shoot an email to jtaylor1619 at gmail dot com. I’ll tell you how to find my real identity on FB and then I can add you to the group.

        I also think it’s searchable if you look for “TNC Affiliates.” From there you may be able to request membership, and BrianSierk (maybe?) can add you.

        Either one will work.🙂

        • chingona

           /  May 30, 2012

          So I was already to do it and then I realized I would have to out myself, too. Am I ready for this? Hmmm … big step.

          • taylor16

             /  May 30, 2012

            Haha! It’s up to you. I’ve been “outed” over there (along with nearly 90 others) and I haven’t heard of a creepy situation yet. I actually prefer the group to my regular FB news feed now, so … I think everyone should join.🙂

            • chingona

               /  May 30, 2012

              It’s not so much the commenters/members that I’m worried about. More like not being sure of the privacy settings because sometimes I share stuff here that I wouldn’t share with most people in real life. (Funny how that works, isn’t it?) Though, if it’s a closed group and we’re just talking oatmeal, it seems unlikely that anything bad can come of it. I’ll do it.

              • helensprogeny

                 /  May 30, 2012

                I think you won’t be disappointed. It’s still very much the Horde, just smaller and with real names.

          • Hey! I did it! Anyone can.

      • caoil

         /  May 30, 2012

        And we don’t have An Emily there, but we make do.

  17. caoil

     /  May 30, 2012

    Ha! I would absolutely buy this, even though it’s not one of my fandoms.

  18. helensprogeny

     /  May 30, 2012

    From the Some Of Us Are Slow Learners file: I just realized that I can clean selected portions of my bathtub with my feet. This makes this thoroughly loathed and oft-neglected chore much more likely to be done with much greater regularity.