Threading it, Openly.

It’s yours….

Standard FYI clause: My rule of thumb is that I wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

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241 Comments

  1. Today for work, I wrote about my mom.🙂

    • Aww! I loved that!

    • scone

       /  May 11, 2012

      Stupid dust.

    • taylor16

       /  May 11, 2012

      Awww. That made me all smiley and happy.🙂

    • wearyvoter

       /  May 11, 2012

      Allergies. Damn allergies. (Seriously, though, good job.)

    • Darth Thulhu

       /  May 11, 2012

      Very cool, super sweet. Just awesome.

      • helensprogeny

         /  May 13, 2012

        Hi, Darth! This is OT, but I just wanted to let you know an out-of-town Horde member is coming through our neck of the woods next Sunday (5/20) and we’ve been talking on the Horde FB page about possibly having a Horde gathering at midday. You up for it? Obviously this goes for all Tucson Horde members (all you lurkers out there!). I’ll make a general announcement on the OTAN during the upcoming week, but if you’d like to connect, let me know here and I can give you my contact info.

        Flyover country meet-up, say yes!

  2. From today’s Sun, the continuing adventures of the awesome Todd Stave:
    http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-abortion-battle-20120510,0,5492429.story

  3. Now that I am, well, I *guess*, settled back in NYS, I’m trying to resuscitate my blog. So….Blog-flog! ajw93.blogspot.com http://ajw93.wordpress.com/(ed: fixt!)
    You can look forward to snarky commentary, pretty pictures, and cheesy music. Hang on to your hats.

  4. Blogflogging! Idol, Game of thrones, Vidal Sassoon etc.
    http://anibundel.wordpress.com/

    Now my Friday question: what’s a more “gender neutral term” for Baby shower? My boss has challenged me to come up with one.

    • Wait what? I don’t get it.

      • We have a pregnant co-worker. Boss wants to throw her an office baby shower, except he doesn’t want to use the term “baby shower” because “that’s too girly.”
        He was calling it a “Celebration of Life” party until I pointed out that’s what the baptists call funerals.
        Since I have ruined his creative new term for baby shower with my unfortunate addition of “facts” I now have to come up with a new, appropriate, gender neutral euphemism. HALP.

    • doginajacket

       /  May 11, 2012

      Isn’t “baby shower” already gender neutral? or is he saying that it sounds like a party you have for a mom-to-be rather than a dad-to-be because that’s what usually happens? Maybe something along the lines of Offspring Anticipatory Celebration? Most of you people are better with words than me…

      • “Assemblage To Allow For The Acknowledgement Of The Impending Birth Of Co-Worker’s Progeny”

      • doginajacket

         /  May 11, 2012

        Oooo-oooo I got it! Keep the “weather ” theme and just butch it up–It’s not a “shower” it’s Baby STORM!

      • Offspring Anticipatory Celebration
        Is WONDERFUL.

        I should add–I love my boss, but he’s rather like working for an adhd 9 year old. Many times getting him to buckle down and focus is like forcing an 8 year old to do his homework on a beautiful spring day. He also has no filter whatsoever (this is why we get along.)

        • aaron singer

           /  May 11, 2012

          SQUIRREL!

        • wearyvoter

           /  May 11, 2012

          SHINY!
          You need to get co-worker a collection of lullabies. I suggest “Stay Awake” from Mary Poppins, and from The Apple Tree: Diary of Adam and Eve, “Go to Sleep, Whatever You Are.” Cast recording is with Barbara Harris and Alan Alda.

    • I think I’m with Craig. I didn’t know “baby” suggested a gender. Perhaps, “celebration of possible birth of mature fetus?” Idk. Good luck.

    • Prenatal Excuse For Partying.

      Does that work?

    • koolaide

       /  May 11, 2012

      Like pretty much everyone else, I think your boss is completely crackers about his “showers are girly” stance. One hopes he at least bathes regularly.

      Others have made lovely suggestions. My own meager offering is “Day to Give X Gifts for the Baby & To Eat Lots of Free Food While Being Paid” where X=the pregnant woman.

      • He is completely crackers. I’m trying to figure out how to warn whomever we hire next.

      • It’s not that baby showers aren’t girly, it’s that it’s not the name that gives them that quality.

        • You are correct sir.

          But that doesn’t stop my husband’s little high-tech office from throwing a baby shower every time one of the (mostly) men there reproduces.

          EVOLUTION FOR ALL.

          • I went to a baby shower one time. Horrid. You ladies can keep that shit, forever.

            • Dude. It’s presents!

              Albeit for someone else. Who you haven’t met yet. But still: Presents!

              (Though it should be noted: I’ve never, in my life, been to one of those stereotypical, play-mind-numbing-games-and-act-like-fools showers. I hope to maintain a perfect record).

              • chingona

                 /  May 11, 2012

                I’ve unfortunately been to several of the game-playing variety, including the awesome (not) “guess how big around she is” and the appetizing “serve melted candy bars in diapers.” I was also at a pretty awesome one on the patio of a bar, in which everyone got a keepsake rubber ducky with devil horns.

                • Dex

                   /  May 11, 2012

                  I’ve been to many showers, most of those with games. (That’s one thing about grad school: it’s very gender neutral about this stuff.) At one, they passed around various jars of baby food that we were supposed to identify based on taste. I’m one of the most adventurous eaters on earth, but some of that shit was NASTY. I remember thinking consciously to myself that I didn’t want to feed my kids anything that tasted as asstacular as that stuff. (We’re gonna make all our baby food, so I’ll be able to keep that promise.)

                  • chingona

                     /  May 11, 2012

                    We made our own baby food for just that reason.

                    • Dex

                       /  May 11, 2012

                      Completely off topic, but I was thinking of you recently when I saw “blacks” invoked as a noun. You’re the shiznit for bringing that up regarding females as a noun. I used to read that in the past and wonder why it bugged me, but I was too language/grammar/usage/generally dumb to be able to nail down why it rubbed me the wrong way.

            • scone

               /  May 11, 2012

              Word. I loathe them.

              I think I’ve shared before that I once hosted a baby shower that was themed “The Road Not Taken” which involved me reading all the horrifying games that I wasn’t going to make anyone play, followed by the guests feeling grateful, followed by cake.

            • taylor16

               /  May 11, 2012

              I’ve never been happier that I live 6 hours away from 90% of my family and friends than I am when a baby shower invitation comes around.

              I love buying baby gifts, but hate baby showers. So if it’s a wedding invite, I’m on my way. If it’s a shower invite, I will go absolutely nuts on buying gifts … but not waste you money in food.

              I am basically the best shower invitee ever.

        • koolaide

           /  May 11, 2012

          I was trying (and apparently failing) to make a joke about what anibundel said upthread about the “shower” part of the name seeming girly to boss-man.

          • To flaming gay boss man. Because I want to make sure you guys understand he’s not being like this because he’s too manly.

            • Dex

               /  May 11, 2012

              Maybe it’s just me, but I’ve known many gay guys who have serious issues with women, but just sort of express themselves differently than the macho assholes. So, they’re too manly in a way, but express it differently.

              Case in point: Andrew Girls Have Cooties Sullivan. Reading that guy talk about women is one of the two reasons I stopped reading his blog.

              • Rebecca Zicarelli

                 /  May 11, 2012

                and now it’s time to let the other show drop. . .

                • Rebecca Zicarelli

                   /  May 11, 2012

                  shoe. not how. the other reason.

                  • Dex

                     /  May 11, 2012

                    Oh, sorry, I didn’t mean to be cryptic.

                    My internet kryptonite is Charles Murray, The Bell Curve and all 21st century incarnations of eugenics, so I washed my hands of Sullivan several months ago. The guy was a total beast on torture and I really admired his public turnaround on Iraq, but I left because I could no longer stomach his thoughts on race and gender.

      • I do have to tell you though, one time I did go to a baby shower… and was the only guy there. Felt too awkward, and had to leave about 30 minutes in. :/

    • Darth Thulhu

       /  May 11, 2012

      The reason “shower” sets off gendering buttons is because of the only other party known to our culture to be called that.

      Not a lot of dudes at most bridal showers. Nor are there a lot of dudes getting groomal showers. Likewise, not a lot of dudes at those baby showers that really over-hype the stereotypical baby-shower tropes (sickeningly cutesy games, poo-fixation).

      It would be nice to reclaim the word and spread it to other kinds of parties and de-femme-ify the parties it is most associated with, but the word is legitimately associated primarily with culturally-tendered parties.

      That said, your boss would have been better off trying to butch-up the shower, rather than seeking another name. As other names go, Captain Button’s Corp-speak was perfect tweaking.

      • The wedding shower my friends and family threw for me was co-ed. And they also made it a Disney princess theme, because (1) we were honeymooning at WDW, and (2) to yank my chain, because I’m me. And the big gruff beardly men all sat there in their princess tiaras. I have the BEST friends.

        • Rebecca Zicarelli

           /  May 11, 2012

          Groomal showers.

          That wins the internets today.

        • Darth Thulhu

           /  May 12, 2012

          Awesome friends, indeed. I hope there was a nice Middle Eastern gent doing a good Jasmine.😉

  5. stephen matlock

     /  May 11, 2012

    Because it’s MY KIDS, here for your viewing pleasure:

    • I.LOVE.IT.

      Word to the wise, kids: Stay through the credits!

      (Interestingly, YouTube thinks the Jim Croce ditty “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” might be of interest to those watching YOUR KIDS’ movie. I got nuthin’ on that).

  6. CRAP!!!! That’s http://ajw93.wordpress.com/

    WORDPRESS. Where the cool kids in the student lounge hang out.

    Good god. I don’t even remember where my own blog is hosted? ::headdesk::

  7. baiskeli

     /  May 11, 2012

    Woe is me. Bike race tomorrow, and I had to go and get a nasty cold. If it’s still a head cold tomorrow morning, I’m racing. If it progresses to a chest cold, no racing for me.

    • dawn0oleary

       /  May 11, 2012

      Be well. Drink lots of hot fluid.

      • stephen matlock

         /  May 11, 2012

        Kobe played last night and he had a stomach virus. Buck up.

        • baiskeli

           /  May 12, 2012

          No race for me. Rule is if it’s above the neck, ok to ride, if below (i.e. in chest) then no go (also verified by Friel’s “The Cyclists Training Bible” and a whole other bunch of racers whose opinions I asked).

          Was up all night coughing and woke up with a wicked chest cold. Riding would only make it much worse (believe me, I once did this, bad idea, turned a week long cold into a month long bronchitis affair).

          The irony is that it’s 75F and sunny. Booo!!!

          • stephen matlock

             /  May 12, 2012

            Hey man, I am sorry to hear this. I know how you love riding.

            Smart, though, to let it pass today so you can do it later.

            • baiskeli

               /  May 12, 2012

              Yeah, I am sitting in my back yard in the sunlight so it’s not all a loss. Thanks.

  8. Captain Button

     /  May 11, 2012

    Blog title interpretation:

    Playing in my head to the tune of “Alone Again, Naturally”.

  9. stephen matlock

     /  May 11, 2012

    @baiskeli – you were referenced in the latest TNC thread for your awesome side business.

    • baiskeli

       /  May 11, 2012

      What side business?

      • stephen matlock

         /  May 11, 2012

        Your rental business.

        • baiskeli

           /  May 11, 2012

          I am so going looking for that thread! Was it in yesterdays OTAN?

          • Today’s black voter’s thread. I think you could make a mint renting black delegates to the GOP convention.

          • stephen matlock

             /  May 11, 2012

            Today’s thread about Allan West.

            Just to point out that you get creds even when you’re not on a thread.

            Not that I’m like jealous or anything Mr. 1 Million Likes on Disqus.

            • baiskeli

               /  May 11, 2012

              🙂
              I wish my weird humor was just as appreciated in meat space. Most times I get a blank stare

              • Rebecca Zicarelli

                 /  May 11, 2012

                I think that may be a common affliction amongst members of the Horde.

                Meat Space is cruel and insensitive and lacks a funny bone.

                • baiskeli

                   /  May 11, 2012

                  Meat Space is cruel and insensitive and lacks a funny bone.

                  Yes it is and it does lack a funny bone, though Newt Gingrich getting bitten by a Penguin proves it can be funny when it wants to. I mean seriously, just how bad of a person do you have to be tobe bitten by one of the cuddliest animals on the planet? It was like a Happy Feet/Saw mashup.

                • wearyvoter

                   /  May 11, 2012

                  My husband tells friends that he will interpret my musings for an additional fee.

                • Dex

                   /  May 11, 2012

                  This is going to sound terrible, but a lot of my co-workers are just not very fun people. They’re perfectly nice and smart and all that good stuff, but often sadly lacking in the humor department. I can make lame jokes and stuff with them and get laughs, but if I want real lolz, it’s the horde that I look to. (My friends outside of work are also good for this as well, but the concentration of big juicy chess club brains with delicious wit and snark in the horde is really unmatched).

                  • stephen matlock

                     /  May 11, 2012

                    That’s truly too bad. We have fun where I work. I was paid once (about 3 years ago) to create a video of “A Day in the Life Of…” and spent more than 160 hours on the 5 minute video. It was a big hit at our All-Hands meeting. We have several internal e-mail lists just for the daily chatter and humor. It’s a killer job, but we have fun. Fun is part of creativity and work, I think. How could you be passionate about something and not see how it was funny?

                    • Dex

                       /  May 11, 2012

                      Yeah, it really is too bad. I’m so jealous of your work environment. I should have known when I started there four years ago. When I first started working there, I found it odd that people were rarely in their offices, and that when they were, they almost never spoke to other co-workers, even if they passed them in the halls. A few weeks into my first semester, I hosted a party for my department and had 25+ people attend. One of the oldsters remarked, quite emotionally, that it had been over 15 years since the department had done anything socially together.

                      Your point about passion is key. Most of my coworkers aren’t the least bit passionate about their jobs, their students, or much of anything, really. It’s just as well that my contract is up after next year. It will force me to work in a place where people care about their jobs and actually want to accomplish things.

                    • stephen matlock

                       /  May 11, 2012

                      I was at a conference last year for my business, and we were in a few roundtables, and I got inappropriately angry and vocal during some of the discussions about what I do for a living. I heard some stuff I thought was just wrong about my work, and I was vocal and unyielding. After I calmed down in my room I wrote an e-mail to my boss to let him know that I was a bit out of control. But then the next day I had people come up to me & tell me that they wish they could work somewhere that would be worth their passion, and that they were jealous that I worked in such a place. That was when it really hit me that as much as I despair of getting things done right — this place has earned my passion, respects it, and validates me.

              • stephen matlock

                 /  May 11, 2012

                Well. I will try to laugh when you make a witty remark should you ever bicycle out here to the West Coast where the sun sets 3 hours after it does in Bawstun.

                • efgoldman

                   /  May 11, 2012

                  Naah. The watah is on the wrong side.

                  • stephen matlock

                     /  May 11, 2012

                    We’ll just point his head south and tell him it’s north. Problem solved.

                • baiskeli

                   /  May 11, 2012

                  I’ve always wanted to visit Seattle, they tell me it’s always sunny.

                  • Dex

                     /  May 11, 2012

                    That’s some cold shit right there. I would bet that Stephen would up and punch you in the mouth for that, but I hear he’s too depressed from the lack of sun to get out of his chair.

                    • Rebecca Zicarelli

                       /  May 11, 2012

                      But it is always sunny there during the day.

                      The sun’s just obscured behind banks of water evaporated off the Pacific. It’s where the ocean exhales; and sometimes the Pacific’s bad breath causes serious mental health issues.

                      /ducks and covers

                    • stephen matlock

                       /  May 11, 2012

                      We put the “Small” in “Dismal”

                    • stephen matlock

                       /  May 11, 2012

                      Not only am I out of my chair, but I drove home in CLEAR SUNNY WEATHER. It was gorgeous. Only 60 degrees, true, and this morning I scraped frost off my car – but when it’s sunny here, well, a bluer sky you never saw, in Seattle.

                  • stephen matlock

                     /  May 11, 2012

                    Oh. Sarcasm. That’s gonna get you far in this town. I WILL MAKE YOU GO TO A TOBY KEITH CONCERT.

              • efgoldman

                 /  May 11, 2012

                A Southern New England meat space meetup would probably appreciate your warpiness.

                • Rebecca Zicarelli

                   /  May 11, 2012

                  I feel SO left out.

                  /stomps off to sulk in the Maine woods

                  • efgoldman

                     /  May 11, 2012

                    Well, if we ever had one, you’d certainly be welcome. After all, Emily went all the way from Chicago to one of the regular meetups they have all the time in DC.

                    • Rebecca Zicarelli

                       /  May 11, 2012

                      Ahem. Somebody with AUTHORITY and RESPECT just needs to call one. Set a time, a place, and blog flog the ell out of it. That’s what the DC horde did. They had persistant blog floggers flogging their meetup; almost as often as Romney attack ads are gonna be in a few months.

                • baiskeli

                   /  May 12, 2012

                  I am so up for this. I couldn’t believe I missed TNC’s reading at MIT a couple of months ago.

      • The ‘rent a black friend’ business🙂

        • baiskeli

           /  May 11, 2012

          My rates have trended upwards to reflect an increasing demand in light of conservatives increasing rates of catastrophic racial incidents.
          🙂

          • Captain Button

             /  May 11, 2012

            Well, of course. You can’t pretend to be a proper conservative without responding to market forces

            • baiskeli

               /  May 11, 2012

              I suspect we’ll get to the point where no on will want to insure the far right against catastrophic racial incidents.

              They are the equivalent of homeowners who build on beaches that have been flooded every single year for the last 100 years and wonder why insurers are loathe to touch their houses with a 10 foot pole.

  10. Picked up the new custom wheel set for my commuting bike last night. I am now the proud owner of probably the only 27″ wheel with a 10-speed compatible hub. They’re definitely heavier, especially because I went with 1-1/4″ rubber, but it’s worth it to have stronger wheels and a bigger contact patch.

  11. cofax

     /  May 11, 2012

    Considering going to see The Avengers again tonight. Not because I think it’s the best movie EVER, but because I enjoyed the hell out of it anyway.

    • Very little can be “the best ever.”

      “Enjoying the hell out of” is a worthy reason to do anything.

    • I went and saw it last night. I’m thinking about doing the same as you.

      • aaron singer

         /  May 11, 2012

        I saw it yesterday, as well. Loved it.

    • Electronic Neko

       /  May 11, 2012

      I have seen the Avengers more than twice, and I definitely picked up more details on subsequent viewings.

    • There are on occasion a movie you want to see multiple times.

      Last time I felt that way about a film was Dark Knight. Before that, The Incredibles.

      Most other times I can wait for DVD…🙂

    • Darth Thulhu

       /  May 11, 2012

      Do it. I’m up to three viewings, and I get more out of it each viewing. I got Hiddleston’s and Ruffalo’s awesomeness in full on the first viewing, Johansen and Paltrow’s on the second, and Evans’s and Renner’s on the third.

      There’s just a lot of good stuff going on.

      • stephen matlock

         /  May 11, 2012

        Just got back from viewing. It was awesome.

  12. David L

     /  May 11, 2012

    Things that should sound easy but aren’t: Getting a room full of programmers to agree on a single unified system for determining who can do what when everyone wrote their own system and both programmers and end users have gotten used to the quirks of that system and don’t want to lose them, even if they’re mutually exclusive with the quirks of other systems.

    It’s like herding cats, but with more passwords.

    • Rebecca Zicarelli

       /  May 11, 2012

      Sweetie’s working on such a project.

      And it’s being managed by consensus and committee.

      Head meets hand slap.

      • JHarper2

         /  May 11, 2012

        Serious question: Does the improvisational nature of jazz intersect with programming in a positive or negative way?

        • Rebecca Zicarelli

           /  May 11, 2012

          Well, I know many musicians who are no longer musicians, they’re programmers. That’s negative.

          But I also know many programmers (music applications) who are musicians without intending to be.

          Both.

        • David L

           /  May 11, 2012

          I’m not at all musical when it comes to creating, but I think it’s a bit of both. When I really need to focus, I’ll put headphones in. I have one playlist that’s got a lot of jazz, but I have another that’s mostly rather repetitive techno for when I need to just grind something out without thinking about anything else at all.

      • I learned years ago that a committee with more than five people is highly unlikely to get anything done. And even then it might be a slog.

      • David L

         /  May 11, 2012

        Oh, the reason for why we’re having to do all of this is the real facepalm moment: The help desk had someone who specialized in access control who recently retired and its somehow everybody else’s fault but the head of the help desk that nobody else up there understands what she did very well.

    • Captain Button sez (but sed it in the wrong place):

      Just define a standard data structure and let them all write their own adapters/interfaces to fit it.

      ed note: I’m given to understand this is English

      • David L

         /  May 11, 2012

        Sadly, the standard (user) interface is exactly what we need because it’s a matter of idiot-proofing things for the help desk (see my comment to Zic above.)

        Ultimately, the fact that our systems are all so different are the result of a clash of cultures among different departments. One system we have is extremely laissez-faire (partly by necessity) and pretty much trusts everyone: if the HR database says your ID belongs to a teacher, then you’re in and you can see and do anything as long as the student you’re looking at has a class with you. On the other hand, the one that deals with special education students has data which is considered protected by both the health care (HIPAA) and education (FERPA) privacy laws, and has some things where you don’t even know that that data is in the system unless you have been individually granted the right to see it.

        • HIPAA and its ilk are a programming nightmare to work around. Not that they aren’t necessary, because they’re totally necessary, but the architectural requirements are nuts in comparison to how people are taught to architect code.

          I don’t actually write the stuff, but I was in IT security in 98-01 and companies dealing with the rollout of HIPAA compliance was UGLY. All kinds of software that was written without the word security appearing once in the minds of the original coders had to be pretzeled into obeying rules the people doing the pretzeling often didn’t understand. A good friend who was trained after that time who eventually ended up writing security code for DRM had never learned anything about secure programming in any coding class he ever took.

          Making THAT idiot proof on the front end is bad enough. Making it so a mixed system with and without HIPAA information presents idiot proof…I don’t really want to think about without a larger paycheck…

  13. Captain Button

     /  May 11, 2012

    Just define a standard data structure and let them all write their own adapters/interfaces to fit it.

    • And where was this supposed to go, my friend? I’ll move it for ye!

      • Captain Button

         /  May 11, 2012

        David L’s “Things that should sound easy but aren’t” post. Thankee

  14. dmf

     /  May 11, 2012

  15. Lifetime is making a reality show about the Houston family picking up the pieces after Whitney’s death.

    I can’t even.

  16. Rebecca Zicarelli

     /  May 11, 2012

    I’ve been busy and missed participating in the OTANs here or there this week.

    So. There’s some news.

    they accepted a design into a book; a book of post-apocalyptic designs, too. Doomsday Knitting. Don’t know title or publication date yet. Sadly, I’d submitted with the suggestion the pattern be done in flow chart format; and Barbara Folk did the flowcharts; but they nixed that; got to keep all patterns looking the same. I think I’m going to propose a book on Logic Knits; hand knits for keeping our inner geeks warm.

    And I’ve a new blog that’s going on the favs list: http://margaretandhelen.com/2012/05/11/mitt-happens/

    Read this, please, please, please. Awesome Sauce.

    Last but not least, there’s such strength in the real world sustained by virtual world friends such as you, Horde. I love you.

    • aaron singer

       /  May 11, 2012

      If the book leads to a movie deal, ask for Michel Gondry.

      • Rebecca Zicarelli

         /  May 11, 2012

        I have never, ever, imagined a move based on a book of knitting patterns before.

        Costumes first, ehh?

        • This summer alone, there are movies of the board game Battleship and a self-help guide for expectant mothers.

        • aaron singer

           /  May 11, 2012

          I was thinking of a post-apocalyptic knitting movie. Sort of the like the stuff made in The Science Of Sleep crossed with Shane Acker’s 9.

        • chingona

           /  May 11, 2012

          Knitting can be very sinister. Just ask Dickens. And knitting plays a major role in “Hereville: How MIrka Got her Sword,” which is a YA comic book about an 11-year-old troll-fighting Orthodox Jewish girl.

          • Rebecca Zicarelli

             /  May 11, 2012

            The publisher is doing a whole series on What Would Madame DuFarge Knit?

            http://www.cooperativepress.com/books/

          • That is a super-awesome book. I talked to the author when he was at Stumptown Comics Fest a few years back.

            • chingona

               /  May 11, 2012

              It’s funny. I feel like I “know” him because I hang out at his blog a lot, but of course I don’t really. He’s working on a sequel.

        • JHarper2

           /  May 11, 2012

          George McDonald Fraser (of Flashman fame) wrote books of short stories based on fictionalized accounts of his time in a Highland regiment after the second world war.
          In one there is a trivia contest against an English Regiment. One line goes something like this:
          Tell the jocks (soldiers) there was to be a knitting contest against England and they would sitting on the touchline saying things like purl, lad, purl and see yon chain stitch boy!

        • JHarper2

           /  May 11, 2012

          George McDonald Fraser (of Flashman fame) wrote books of short stories based on fictionalized accounts of his time in a Highland regiment after the second world war.
          In one there is a trivia contest against an English Regiment. One line goes something like this:
          Tell the jocks (soldiers) there was to be a knitting contest against England and they would sitting on the touchline saying things like purl, lad, purl and see yon chain stitch boy!

          • Rebecca Zicarelli

             /  May 11, 2012

            I do love this, JHarper2, but also: remember that wool, spinning, weaving, and knitting was a way of life on the British Isles — on all of them. And unless you were rich, you knit or spun or wove. Pictures abound of both men and women at work, even knitting and spinning (with a drop spindle) while walking to and from another occupation.

          • efgoldman

             /  May 11, 2012

            Wow, that’s a real nice trick!
            A double post with two different, FYWP-imposed avatars.

    • cofax

       /  May 11, 2012

      Oh, Margaret & Helen! I LOVE them. So happy they’re back.

      • Rebecca Zicarelli

         /  May 11, 2012

        Such an awesome friendship. When I’m old, I want to wear a purple dress, a red hat, and blog like Margaret and Helen. And kick some ass.

  17. Neocortex

     /  May 11, 2012

    Warning: I quote lots of offensive stuff in this comment.

    I guess the managing editor of the newsletter for the BPPA (Boston police union) doesn’t like Occupy Boston (or really, anyone else) very much. The newsletters are online, and someone noticed them, and linked.

    Some choice quotes:

    On homeless members of Occupy Boston: “Their sex lives have also been greatly diminished, what with the lack of guilt-ridden, stupid college girls who offered themselves willingly to the poor and downtrodden victims of oppression.” Two sentences later, the newsletter refers to them as “Pine St or St Francis House leeches” (those are homeless shelters).

    Also, “Free food, free clothes, free stuff being dropped off by suburban idiots in Volvos and BMW’s, and free rich, liberal college girls who are willing to … well…’assuage their guilt’ by offering ‘benefits’ to the poor and downtrodden.”

    (This guy is really obsessed with the idea that Occupy is full of stupid rich slutty college girls going around screwing every homeless person in sight out of rich liberal guilt. I had to wonder if he gets off from this fantasy or something.)

    On marches: They’re “ruining the night for thousands of people who actually work for a living.”

    On a couple of teenage runaways who went to Occupy Newark: “Thank God the cops found them before one the occupiers ‘invited’ the young girl (or boy) into their tent for a cup of cocoa…”

    There’s lots, lots more (also a poem about how terrible we are). Including a grossly inaccurate (we have lots of video) article claiming that a bunch of people attacked police at a particular incident, and fat-shaming a female Occupier. And lest you think the editorial staff of the BPPA newsletter are pretty reasonable except for hating Occupy, here’s what they had to say on a city program to provide housing for homeless pregnant women and women escaping domestic violence:

    “Once again, we see liberal stupidity in action, exacerbating the very problem they
    pretend to be solving. There exists a veritable plethora of young, stupid, teenage
    strumpets who currently live in their deadbeat-parent (notice I didn’t use the plural
    ‘parents’, for good reason) taxpayer-subsidized apartment who would love nothing
    more than to have their own taxpayer-subsidized apartment complete with free appliances, a free TV, an EBT card, a WIC voucher, etc. etc. ad nauseum as previously mentioned. There, they could entertain their fellow teenage deadbeats who have been brought up to believe that the government not only supplies them with everything, but owes it to them as an entitlement. Work and responsibility…is for taxpaying suckers. And now the city, in its infinite wisdom, will be acting to enable these little trollops to have exactly what they want simply by getting knocked up and making sure that the father (I apologize – ‘father’ is such an old term) er… the ‘babydaddy’ – doesn’t take any responsibility for the child. Yes, I can see it now: from the Bunker Hill projects
    in Charlestown to Beech St. in Roslindale, an army of pre-pubescent harlots demanding
    their own domicile supplied courtesy of you and I, the taxpayers, along with all the fixins’.”

    It really makes me unhappy that these people have the power to do me harm and probably get away with it. Especially with the stories that have been coming out about the NYPD’s use of sexual assault against protesters, and this author’s contempt for female protesters. It’s mostly one author, but, the union gives him this position of influence and trust, from which he gets to encourage the whole BPD to dehumanize people, and lets him keep it. Funny thing is, the day before we noticed this people were talking about joining the BPD union for a picket, to support their contract negotiations.

    • Rebecca Zicarelli

       /  May 11, 2012

      Thank you for digging through this so that nobody else has to. It’s a dirty, thankless job. So I’m thanking.

    • Maybe those are the college girls who refused to have sex with him because he’s a cop. But really, it’s astonishing.

    • efgoldman

       /  May 11, 2012

      The BPPA has given Neanderthals a bad name since before the busing crisis in the mid-70s. They would have to move miles back to the left, just to get to reactionary. Their newsletter used to be actively and unashamedly racist, using lots of the same kinds of images that have been making the Wingnut rounds since Obama was nominated in 2008.

  18. I have for the past few days been working with Portals as per Cave Johnson’s memo.

    My latest excursion into Test Chamber design is thus http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=71337204 titled “You Exit By Going Lower”.

    For those with Portal 2 access, I request you subscribe and rate my work(s).

    Also, I know there are epublishers among the ranks of the Horde: I need your ebook info so I can see about using my B&N gift card for my Nook! Now!

    • I reinstalled it yesterday to start mucking around with the new levels. One of the things Portal has needed since the beginning.

      On a side-note, the promo video for the Perpetual Testing Initiative is as inspired as the whole thing. J. K. Simmons is just bleeping amazing as Cave Johnson. Nails the character to the wall.

  19. caoil

     /  May 11, 2012

    $#@^*&@!+%#
    Who in their right mind wants a 440+ page document reformatted from scratch? I would like to set All The Things on fire, pls.

    • doginajacket

       /  May 11, 2012

      Sympathy like. Here’s a match: ———–o

      • doginajacket

         /  May 11, 2012

        Can I have that match back? I now have to go back & re-do a big huge thing because somebody came up with something that changes everything.

        • caoil

           /  May 11, 2012

          I’m sure I can find a smoker around here who can pass me their lighter. So yes! Take the match back.

    • koolaide

       /  May 11, 2012

      Sounds like my boss. Ony w/ him it was multiple such docs that had been digitized by an incredibly crappy ocr program that pretty much trashed every third word.

      • caoil

         /  May 11, 2012

        Yeah, this came out of a pdf that must have been made searchable at some point, as I could copy the text out from it. But, typical for ocr, it’s not exactly right. So I’m having to watch as I go for things that spell check isn’t highlighting.

        There are two of us working on this, and it’s still not going to be done when I leave at 4:00.

        I’m glad I have alcohol in the fridge at home, is all I’m sayin’.

        • Electronic Neko

           /  May 11, 2012

          OCR is the devil. It’s juuuuuust accurate enough to drive you insane trying to proofread.

          • efgoldman

             /  May 11, 2012

            I started with my current major mutual fund/brokerage company in 1996. OCR was going to be the Next Big Thing. All the new versions of forms and applications were printed with little squares for all the characters.
            Damn thing never worked at all (and we have state-of-the-art, very sophisticated imaging.
            It became the system that must not be named by 2003.

            • David L

               /  May 11, 2012

              I believe that good optical handwriting recognition is one of the holy grails of computer science/artificial intelligence, but I’m pretty sure that the previous failures and the ubiquity of keyboards these days means that it’s not getting a lot of research money.

              OCR for printed text, as I understand it, is getting to where, if you have good software and are willing to wait a bit longer, it’s able to get very accurate. ISTR that the software Google’s using for its book scanning (where time is not at all of the essence) uses a dictionary and learns the font that’s being used to try to get better accuracy on its output.

              • cofax

                 /  May 11, 2012

                Waaaay too many books I have bought recently on Kindle are burdened with terrible, terrible OCR errors. As in, clearly nobody even bothered to run spell-check on them.

                • Yeah. I’ve bought a lot of Kindle books (from major publishers, no less) that are clearly OCR disasters. “n” and “h” are not interchangeable, and there’s a difference between “rn” and “m.” I’m used to translating as I go, at this point…

            • caoil

               /  May 11, 2012

              We do have a program (Omnipage) that is extremely accurate (certainly better than Adobe’s internal ocr process), but as would be typical for a Friday at my workplace, it crapped out on me about halfway through this monster document.

      • and this is why I love my boss, despite his inability to handle the phrase “baby shower.”

    • koolaide

       /  May 11, 2012

      In my haste to post I neglected to give you a solidarity fist-bump & wish you luck.

      ::bump:: Good luck.

    • Open file.
      Choose Edit. Scroll to Select All and Click.
      Go to Format and click. Locate what needs formatting (Paragraph, Page, et al). Make the format change as needed.
      Save as (newfile name to distinguish from rough draft)
      Print, using your boss’ print code so it gets charged to the boss.
      Enjoy weekend.

      • caoil

         /  May 11, 2012

        If only!
        This is some kind of agreement, I think, which is 86 pages long in its own right (and requires automatic numbering, a TOC, and cross-references), but then they have 11 exhibits attached, which adds the other 300+ pages, and which also have to be formatted to some extent (headings, bolding, whatnot, blah de blah blah).

  20. stephen matlock

     /  May 11, 2012

    EMILY
    DO NOT HATE ME
    I DELETED YOUR E-MAIL WITH THE MAILING INFORMATION

    You may, of course, call me an idiot for I deserve it.

  21. Captain Button

     /  May 11, 2012

    Emily on Twitter: “PEOPLE ARE EVOLVING ALL OVER THE PLACE.”

    Babylon 5 flashback: We were not dying. We were EVOLVING!

  22. koolaide

     /  May 11, 2012

    Just wanted to say thanks to everyone for your advice in my car purchasing & fussing w/ the dealship saga.

  23. Not much of a music hunter, but this song, “Kimchi Line” by Bhi Bhiman, has been deep in my head for two days.

    We eat a lot of home-made kimchi here, so that oddity helps stick it in my head, but the setting of a very American folk type song in North Korea helps. Also, the canonical recipe for kimchi is embedded in the song, so now it is impossible for me to forget the ingredients when we make the trek to H-Mart in Burlington.

    Also, in case someone reading this happens to share my love for old-school, story-based, tactical RPGs, Avernum 4-6 is out on Steam now as a package for under $10. You should get it, because it’s awesome, Jeff Vogel is a long time shareware warrior from very long ago, and because.

    http://store.steampowered.com/app/206020/

    • Captain Button

       /  May 11, 2012

      I love kimchi, at least the version they sell in the restaurant near me. Have tried making Kimchi Jigae at home.

      • The thing we use it the most for is in fried rice, but it’s also works surprisingly well as a topping for sandwiches. I’m not generally one for hot peppers on…anything…but I’ll eat a kimchi-dog or burger any day. Works really well.

    • They should play this on Hugh Jackman’s Kimchi Chronicles.

  24. For my internship I’m tentatively planning on taking Bolt Bus from DC to New York, staying the night, and then taking the Peter Pan bus line to Williamstown the following morning. I would really like to take my bike with me, but I’m questioning the logistics of getting it there. I know I’ll have to pay an extra baggage fee, which I’m fine with, but Peter Pan says if there isn’t enough space I’ll have to purchase a bicycle box, which I assume means I’m going to have to disassemble my bike and put it back together again. Anyone have experience in bringing a bike on travel? How much of a hassle is it?

    • efgoldman

       /  May 11, 2012

      Peter Pan from NY to Western MA?
      There’s a sign over their gate at Port Authority which starts “Abandon All Hope…”

  25. snailspace

     /  May 11, 2012

    OK, who here recommended Bujold’s Curse of Chalion? You are responsible for my seeing 2am this morning.

    I’m also blaming you for lack of productivity as I sneak out to the library this afternoon to grab Paladin of Souls.

    • Captain Button

       /  May 11, 2012

      Being awake at such an hour is clearly the influence of The Bastard.

      And ditching work may caus The Father to judge you harshly.

    • cofax

       /  May 11, 2012

      Erm, that was me. And yes, isn’t it great?

      • snailspace

         /  May 11, 2012

        It really is great! The character-drawing, and the complex and interesting theology, reminds me of Guy Gavriel Kay.

        Why *hasn’t* there been a major five-fold theology?

        • cofax

           /  May 11, 2012

          Bujold is better than Kay.

          I burned out on Kay some years back: he uses the same narrative tricks over and over and over again, and he’s really into playing games with the reader. Which I don’t mind in limited circumstances, but he does it all the time, and not always for good reason. Which is a pity, because I have great fondness for everything he wrote up to Lions of Al-Rassan, but the epilogue of that pissed me off, and nothing he’s written since has shown that he’s improved in any way. (Also, he thinks he’s Dorothy Dunnett, and he’s not.)

          • Rebecca Zicarelli

             /  May 11, 2012

            I felt that way for his earlier books.

            But recent works have been stunning. The Sarantine Mosiac is a wonder.

            And Under Heaven? I read it, and then re-read it immediately, and I’m thinking of going in for a third dunk. It’s awesomely beautiful.

            • mythopoeia

               /  May 11, 2012

              Zic, I’m a definite Kay fan, but I can’t appreciate the Sarantine Mosaic books at all: having studied that period of time in depth, I’m way too close to the source material and I can see exactly what he’s using wholesale and what he’s made only minor changes to. The last two have been delights, which gives me great hope for the one he’s coming out with next year (Song dynasty China is the setting).

              Have you read A Song For Arbonne? Might be his most underappreciated.

              • Rebecca Zicarelli

                 /  May 11, 2012

                I love Song for Arbonne. I think I’ve read everything he’s written. (And I dream of those talking birds, flitting around a massive bull. But I grew up on a farm with cattle; it evokes magic of childhood.)

                Under Heaven is, by far, my favorite. Arbonne. The Lions of Al Rasson. And Last Light of the Sun.

                Sigh. Must go read.

          • mythopoeia

             /  May 11, 2012

            I have to stick my nose in here to say that while I agree that Kay uses the same tricks over and over again, and my appreciation for any book of his is in inverse proportion to how often he says, “And then, something happened!” and cuts away for 90 pages, Tigana is my favorite novel of all time.

            ALL TIME.

            I’ll give Bujold a shot though. Nice to hear of similar authors.

            • snailspace

               /  May 11, 2012

              Yup. I read Tigana first, then Song for Arbonne, then Sarantine Mosaic. Will still re-read those any time. What I loved about the Sarantine Mosaic books was that it made me learn more about the history of that era of the Byzantine Empire, and then wonder why the hell these stories aren’t as well known as the Caesar-Pompey-Augustus era. The women are so fascinating!

              But yeah, reading the Fionavar Tapestry after those? Weirdly disappointing. Full of beautiful images and moments and concepts, but I didn’t love it as a whole.

              Lions of al-Rassan I cannot read again because it still upsets me that the Reconquista happened. At all. Ever. In history. Yes it’s been over five hundred years. No, I’m still not over it.

        • Captain_Button

           /  May 11, 2012

          Well, in Discordianism you have The Law of Fives.

  26. R_Bargis

     /  May 11, 2012

    Grumble grumble grumble grumble grumble our neighbors on the other side of the alleyway are passive aggressive assholes who will never tell us anything but call the property service that manages the duplex we rent and complain at them, and the property service emails me on a Friday afternoon and says “Hey, someone (we can’t say who!) wants this fixed! Have you fixed it? Have a nice weekend! :)”

    Okay, done ranting.

    Anyway, looks like we need to get our gutters cleaned (our lease specifically states that we’re responsible for cleaning the gutters). The ones over the porches we can do ourselves, but the ones on the third story that look down into a 2′ wide alleyway are beyond our ability. Any idea how much hiring a gutter cleaning service will cost? My parents always did it themselves.

    • efgoldman

       /  May 11, 2012

      Your local rental place probably has a power washer with a gutter-cleaning (U-shaped) nozzle.

      • R_Bargis

         /  May 11, 2012

        The hose hook-up is on the other side of our duplex and the logistics of getting it around the house and up 40 feet sound… complicated. I think I’d have to lean out of my third story window and fish the hose up with rope. But the local place we called didn’t think it would be terribly expensive to clean 30 feet of gutter – they’ll give us an estimate on Tuesday and we’ll scooch out the front windows and clean the porch gutters this weekend.

        The gutters do need to get cleaned, but it annoys me that the neighbors are complaining that our clogged gutters are flooding their basement. They complained during the hurricane that our sump pump was broken and flooding their basement. It was not; I could hear it working, and our basement stayed bone dry. I think their basement just floods.

        • R_Bargis

           /  May 11, 2012

          See also: reasons why I feel in no rush to be a home owner. The gutters are also rusted through in spots and the tin on the porch roof is so overdue for a painting that it’ll probably need to be replaced, and it’s delightfully freeing to know that I won’t have to pay for that.

          • snailspace

             /  May 11, 2012

            Are you saying that your TIN ROOF! is RUSTY! ?

            Because if so, you know what your house has be called…

            • Dex

               /  May 11, 2012

              Love shack, baby love shack.

              I’ve got me a Chrysler
              It’s as big as a whale
              and it’s about to set sail!

  27. http://www.thesadbastardbar.com/2012/04/dont-drop-your-imagination_06.html

    Don’t Drop Your Imagination
    This world pretends it is made of plans, vacations that must be saved for,
    compensation that must be provided and cash settlements for those injured in earnest due to negligence or fraud.
    But it is not that.
    It is trying to distract you
    from all the truth worth knowing, worth holding,
    so that your imagination may shatter on that distraction
    like a soft-shelled egg on a concrete floor.

    This world builds cubicles and bills and advertisements and receipts.
    It conjures up television sets which replay the lives of those it holds sacred,
    but it keeps those in false hands that are not fit to carry you.
    And its sets, as all sets, must be broken down to see what is beyond them.
    Your are not your role in this multi-camera nuisance.
    You have to keep with dignity the things the world
    dismisses as myths so that it may better lie to you
    of what it knows and what is certain.

    It says that you are a simple person in a plain cotton shirt.
    It tells you what parts you have and when to collect payments.
    It wants you to forget what you have as a child dreamt
    so that it may sweep the forgotten with its bitter stride
    into the spaces between refrigerators and kitchen counters,
    never to be found again, mounting tenant liabilities on deposits;
    abandoned even by the cleaning crew who note it dubiously if at all.

    This world pretends that all it has to give is public parks
    with benches the homeless ruin by existing on,
    amusement parks with long lines of sweaty tourists
    and their anxious absent children,
    or golf courses for bankers and brokers to spend leisure on
    when they’re exhausted from the swell of their constant criminal regimen.

    But this world has space and rockets.
    This world has epic skies
    and dogfights in the clouds.
    This world has atoms exploding
    and turning the history of a town
    into debris.
    It has mystery in dark corridors.
    It has suspicious characters
    forcing creeks
    into
    the wooden
    staircases.
    This is not a small plastic mayonnaise container
    and you are not a simple frog.

    This world keeps universes hiding on circuits, in wires
    and through cables at the bottom of the sea.
    It keeps beasts in oceans
    lower than your tallest mountains
    that wander the floor undiscovered in majestic beams
    of disgusting color
    with flimsy teeth, and crooked eyes
    and coarse, cutting scales.

    This world says it is cancer and subscription services,
    that there is no cure,
    only constant treatment and insurance premiums.
    But I feel the pulsing fear of the matador,
    the exposed skin of motorcycle outlaws,
    the inventions at fairs that are not for sale,
    that are there only to speak
    to the visions young children hide from in old age.

    This world wants you in its shelters,
    on its public assistance,
    in the aggravated subways howling under broadway junction,
    certain of violence.
    But you are not the human resource case,
    or the mercy of your social workers
    or the casualty of a cop minding his pension.
    You are of revolutions.
    You are of skin by the millions roaring against each other in the heat of justice come.
    You are of the quaking earth.

    This world gives you its Republicans,
    its abortion clinic protesters,
    and its corporate tax attorneys.
    It crowds the possibility of escape
    with blocks of non-profit internships
    where you learn what it is
    to type and hate good things done poorly.
    And it says freedom is the shallowness
    of its conference rooms,
    of its privatized pensions,
    of old men picketing healthcare
    and reaching in their bitter incontinence
    for the gutters they confuse for stars.
    But it has not been long
    since imperfect beings rallied together
    and laid claims of substance and love
    like thunder
    through the barren, narrow minds
    of killers in uniform.
    It has not been long since
    we remembered the dead true smoke of stars
    carried within all those
    who run with their shoddy hobbled feet
    among the bulls
    in marathons of courage.
    It has not been long since we dreamt of deserts and seas,
    of Ivanhoe and Moby Dick,
    and known grace on earth and in flesh
    whose tales grew larger than the myths we built
    so they could have somewhere to begin.

    It has not been long since we were bigger
    than this world told us we could be.
    And it will try to tell you it has no space
    for giants,
    that its mountains do not move,
    that all the statues have found pedestals
    and history is now dull, uneventful
    anecdotes.
    But is lying.
    Carl Sagan has been dead for a minute,
    but a minute is not long enough to forget.

  28. wearyvoter

     /  May 11, 2012

    Spent the morning trudging through the annual physical, then came back home and signed up to be able to view most of my test results on line. Got the cholesterol panel back already. It’s still above 200, but is 37 points lower than last time. Looks like the beans, oatmeal, fruit, and green tea festival is going to be happening for a long time. The HDL is high normal; the LDL needs to get cut back about 50 more points. I do NOT want to go on statins. Those drugs are starting to get a reputation for pushing people from borderline into Type II diabetes, which already runs in my family. Blood sugar is in the very normal range.

    • I too am somewhat skeptical of statins. Any time you block one step in a synthetic pathway, the precursor compounds will build up with nowhere to go. You’ve got to wonder what the liver is doing with them, especially when people are on the drugs for decades.

      • aaron singer

         /  May 11, 2012

        When I was young and growing I was on experimental cholesterol-lowering drugs (I have familial high cholesterol), as they did not want to give statins to a child because of the risks of liver damage in the long-run; at the time (mid-90s), they said there were no long-term studies done on statins and children.

        • As I mentioned late in yesterday’s open thread, there’s currently half a kilo of a drug in my boss’s office that would probably solve that problem, without any enzyme inhibition. What it does is stimulate the thyroid hormone receptor in the liver, which increases the rate of LDL uptake into the liver and the rate at which cholesterol is converted into bile acids and excreted. Sadly, though it made it all the way through Phase II testing without a hitch, the investors in the company that was developing it (from my boss’s patent) decided that there was a sufficiently large market for a non-statin cholesterol lowering drug, so the plug got pulled. Which is a shame, because there are obviously some not so good things about statins. But with medicine, it’s often the devil you know.

          • Rebecca Zicarelli

             /  May 11, 2012

            Did they buy the patent rights? Because there’s a whole lot of money out there sloshing around for alternatives to statins in a world awash with childhood obesity problems. And mounting evidence about the problems of statins.

            • So, the drug was discovered and patented in the early 90s. It was licensed in the late 90s and made it through Phase II clinical trials. The company folded last year, which is why my boss has so much of the drug. They weren’t doing anything with it, so they sent it to him.

              It may end up getting used for some orphan diseases, as we’re finding that it has other useful effects, but it’s probably never going to be marketed at an anti-cholesterol drug. Like I said, the investors didn’t think that it would stand a chance against statins within the patent window.

    • aaron singer

       /  May 11, 2012

      I haven’t had health insurance in years, and as I have familial high cholesterol I really fear what my cholesterol level is. When I was born it was over 300.

      • wearyvoter

         /  May 11, 2012

        An acquaintance of mine once suggested that someone should run a side-by-side clinical trial of some sort where one group used red wine and dark chocolate versus another group used statins to see who had the better success rate. He joked that he’d be one of the red wine and chocolate participants.

  29. stephen matlock

     /  May 11, 2012

    How can I tell it’s a warm (60F!) sunny day in Seattle?

    THEY HAVE THE AIR CONDITIONER ON STUN.

    I am freezing here in the office.

  30. stephen matlock

     /  May 11, 2012
  31. May I put this here? Bayard Rustin, Barack Obama, and Homophobia in the Black Community http://wp.me/p1c3VI-Y1

  32. Holy guacamole, this may be the most offensive thing I’ve seen about the Trayvon Martin case to date: Trayvon Martin gun range targets sold online
    “Channel 4 left numerous phone and text messages with attorneys representing Trayvon Martin’s family but did not receive a response Thursday.” – That’s the kind of thing that makes me glad I am no longer a journalist. I’d hate to be the person who has to call the family and say, “Did you know someone is selling gun range targets made to look like your son? What do you think of that?”

    • This can’t be life

    • dawn0oleary

       /  May 11, 2012

      I think I’d be suing someone for misappropriation of image and right of publicity, under Illinois law.

  33. Lil Boosie is found not guilty!!

  34. stephen matlock

     /  May 12, 2012

    Got some book covers back from my designer. I am so jazzed, but the wait is killing me.

    (I’m going to publish by end of the summer if I don’t pick up an agent by end of August, so this is my fall-back plan).

  35. stephen matlock

     /  May 13, 2012

    Hey Emily – Happy Mother’s Day. Make sure your kids treat you right!

  36. Bookwoman

     /  May 13, 2012

    Greetings from Israel! Who knew that a kibbutz (well, a modern kibbutz hotel) would have free wi-fi?

    We’re a week into our trip, with three days to go, and we’ve seen so much that my brain is a jumble. It’s an interfaith trip (Jews and Christians) and we’ve met with Israeli Jews, Israeli Arabs, Palestinian Muslims and Palestinian Christians, sometimes all in the same room. As our guide (who’s superb) says, every group has a narrative, and sometimes many narratives, and sorting through them all is a huge undertaking. I’m going to need a while to process everything I’ve seen and heard.

    We’ve also seen some gorgeous places, both natural and historic. This kibbutz is right on the Sea of Galilee, and we arrived here after having spent five days in Jerusalem. After two nights here we go to Tel Aviv for two days before flying home. Talk to you all later in the week!