To conversate – a verb? Discuss – an open thread.

You know what to do! (Don’t forget: I’m super busy with work – if you get stuck in moderation, I’ll fish you out as soon as ever I can!)

Standard FYI clause: My rule of thumb is that I wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

257 Comments

  1. Captain Button

     /  March 26, 2012

    This sentence no verb.

  2. I remember when we used to live in the big city. But this shtetl is nice too, I guess.

    • Ian

       /  March 26, 2012

      I am so tired of this podunk fucking shtetl.

      • LOOK. If I could remember the Yiddish Policeman’s Union better, I would make a really cutting reference to the fact that the eggsalad is good, or something! But I don’t, so I can’t!

        So there!

        • Ian

           /  March 26, 2012

          (This is a very nice shtetl. It’s my own shtetl I can’t take.)

    • We used to dreaaaaaaam of a shtetl.

  3. Tomorrow it will be the shared birthday of both Nathan Fillion, famously Canadian acting person, and caoil, famously Canadian hobbit. They will both be 41. Huzzah!

    Fillion is doing this really nice thing and using the birthday buzz to fundraise for a clean water initiative: http://mycharitywater.org/p/campaign?campaign_id=25388

    It’s the Browncoat thing to do, if you have a few spare doubloons. And I figure caoil wouldn’t mind, either.

    • carlos the dwarf

       /  March 26, 2012

      I find it kind of unfortunate that he’s supporting Charity:water. Not that they don’t go great work–but their founder’s connections in the evangelical Christian world give him access to a lot of free services that other non-profits don’t get, and they use that to suck the oxygen out of the room for a whole bunch of other great organizations. When I worked in non-profit development, I used to hear all the time about, “Oh, Charity:Water’s doing X, Y, and Z, and your non-profit should be doing that too!” …and then I’d look into it and discover that they were only able to do that because they were getting tens of thousands of dollars worth of free services donated by an evangelical-owned organization.
      I don’t mean this to criticize Nathan Fillion or Charity:Water. I just feel compelled to go on this rant whenever someone mentions Charity:Water, to remind people that there are lots of great non-profits out there that don’t get the celebrity buzz or the support services that Charity:Water does.

    • caoil

       /  March 26, 2012

      Wondertwins powers activate! And since I’m having a spot of trouble with that number, I’m adding them together, so I am turning 5!

      Yes. Clean water initiatives get a biiiiig thumbs up from me.

      (also, you’re very sweet. So there’s that)

  4. So, there’s the final Game of Thrones trailer up on my blog today http://bit.ly/HcoYCJ , along with the first Dr Who Series Seven trailer. http://bit.ly/GRePcm

    The fashions on MadMen last night were finally mid60s: http://bit.ly/GReYg6

    and for the project runway crowd, there’s reviews of all the finale lines:
    http://bit.ly/Hc0gB5
    http://bit.ly/GSj62S
    http://bit.ly/GT2jh7

    Just, please don’t plagiarize anything. Once today is enough.🙂 (If you want to know what I’m talking about check out the last comment in the “anibundel” section.)

    • Bookwoman

       /  March 26, 2012

      Wow. Do students really think their professors aren’t going to check these things?

      • Ian

         /  March 26, 2012

        There are different kinds of plagiarists, but the most common kind (the ones who hand in somebody else’s work because they didn’t do theirs and they don’t want a zero) are not diligent. Can’t be bothered to write their own papers, but they also can’t be bothered to spend some time imagining the different ways they might get caught. For example, I had a student hand in another student’s paper as his own. I would have caught it anyway, but in this case I didn’t even have to read the paper because the only part of the header that he changed was the name. Wrong course number, wrong date, wrong assignment.

        • ralphdibny

           /  March 26, 2012

          I often tell my students “If you are determined to plagiarize, at least be good at it.” I’ve had students turn in papers that began “as a college professor . . . ” and once had a male student’s paper that began “as a woman . . . ”

          I just had one yesterday where the student actually did do a bit of work. She changed a lot of the sentences to her own words. Unfortunately for her, the assignment was to summarize a chapter of a certain book, not the entire book.

        • taylor16

           /  March 26, 2012

          I also had a student hand in another student’s paper as his own. I probably wouldn’t have noticed, except that I used turnitin.com, so it came back 95% plagiarized. I expected it to be off the internet, and was surprised when it came back as a match to a student from the previous semester.

          But I was surprised because it was a 95% match, not a 100% one. Upon looking at it, it looked like the kid had gone through the first 3-4 pages of the ten page paper and had changed some words around and added a sentence or two. But apparently gave up by page 3.5 and just turned it in.

          Not diligent, indeed. So stupid.

          • Ian

             /  March 26, 2012

            Weirdest plagiarism story. I got a draft that I knew was copied but I couldn’t find the original. Lacking proof, I marked it up and challenged the thesis, essentially demanding that she rewrite it entirely. Then I got this crazy, anonymous email that was obviously from the person–her boyfriend, it turned out–who had written the paper. It was kind of like your standard Ron Paul troll rant if you sub in his glorious paper for Ron Paul. In effect, the dude ratted out his girlfriend because I insulted his paper.

            • Dude, you are *brilliant*.

              • Ian

                 /  March 26, 2012

                It’s not like I planned it that way! I just wanted to make her do some work if I couldn’t fail her. I kept that email on my cubicle wall for two years.

    • Lolz. I’m going to be on the look out for plagiarizers in my upcoming “The Hats of Downton” course.

      • Well, now I have a fancy copyright symbol on all my posts. Not that it will really do much, but it can’t hurt as a deterrent.

        • Ian

           /  March 26, 2012

          Now the kids will have fancy copyrighted papers.

    • JHarper2

       /  March 26, 2012

      For some reason which means I will have to check my settings on your most excellent blog, I got a copy of that email in dialysis this morning. I was all wtf. Although the old saying has it that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, I don’t think that plagiarism has anything sincere about it.

      Especially when the originator is trying to get set up with a more lucrative gig.

      • I think you might have set yourself to receive all comments in that thread, since you are the only one who had ever commented there? That’s my theory.

    • efgoldman

       /  March 26, 2012

      One year in college, I used to plagiarize myself.
      There were two compositon professors on the music faculty. They hated each other as only academics can, and hadn’t spoken a word directly to each other in 25 years. And I had better things to do (mostly involving fermented grains) so I would write a short piece for Prof. R, then copy it out for Prof. N the following week. Got and A in one class, B in the other.

      • The best I had was when I was forced to retake the qualifying exam from the biology department. One of the professors didn’t write a new essay question, so I took the essay that I had written the first time, made all the corrections that he had indicated on it, and turned that in. I passed the second time around.

      • Captain Button

         /  March 26, 2012

        This story would be better if they both then tried to publish it as their own work, with ensuing hilarity.

      • David L

         /  March 26, 2012

        I once had a professor who based your entire course grade on one project. He didn’t care whether you worked individually as long as every individual turned in a separate copy of the work. My friend and I turned in documents that were absolutely identical but for the name, stacked on top of each other in the box outside his door. I got a B, he got an A. I still can’t figure that one out.

        • efgoldman

           /  March 26, 2012

          Unrelated, except by silliness: I had two sets of paperwork involving a transfer from another company, for a husband and wife. I sent all of it, by overnight carrier, in one envelope. The husband’s transfer was executed in less than a week; they claimed never to have received the wife’s paperwork!
          Fortunatly I was ablec to talk with a senior processing rep, and asked him to check the file (still paperwork in those days, not images) and he found both sets of cpaper stapled together.

          • taylor16

             /  March 26, 2012

            I always, always, always send insurance appeal letters paperclipped (rather than stapled) together.

            Because I cannot tell you how many times I have gotten a rejection of an appeal that makes it clear that whoever is in charge of data entry has scanned in my appeal without noticing or caring that there are multiple sheets of paper attached to the cover sheet. I’ll get a (scanned) copy of the coversheet with “no documentation attached” written on it. Even though the appeal was ten pages long.

  5. So, this story is kind of a response to Emily’s recent question: Do Republicans understand that a man is involved in every pregnancy? Answer: Yes, and only the man should be allowed to decide if the pregnancy is terminated. http://www.addictinginfo.org/2012/03/22/alaska-republican-says-women-should-have-to-get-permission-from-men-to-get-an-abortion/

    • Ian

       /  March 26, 2012

      To be fair to Dick, Dick doesn’t think a man should be able to tell a woman to end a pregnancy if she doesn’t want to. Dick just thinks a man should be able to tell a woman not to. Also, Dick has apologized:

      “Sometimes things that we say while discussing sensitive issues could be said better…
      I was trying to make a point that if the law makes a man responsible (and rightly so) for a child he has fathered – it might also require that he be informed before a decision is made to terminate the life of his unborn child. I have reconsidered my thoughts in light of the comments from those who called and will be more careful in how I phrase my thoughts in the future.”

      • Translation: “Sorry I let the cat out of the bag early, guys.”

      • True, it’s very unfortunate when the two parents disagree on whether or not to get an abortion. But this guy is still a . . . what’s that word? Starts with D?

        • Ian

           /  March 26, 2012

          I wonder if, under the Dick regime, a woman will have recourse to some kind of “This Baby Isn’t Yours” appeal. Or in that case would we just stone her? I think I’ll email him right now and ask.

          • Ian

             /  March 26, 2012

            Done. That was cathartic:

            “I’m sorry that everyone is jumping all over you about this “permission for an abortion” thing. I have concerns about it, too, but they’re more logistical. If a woman wanted an abortion, and the baby’s father didn’t want her to have it, what if she just said that it wasn’t his? Could she file some kind of, “Hey, that kid isn’t yours” form to get out of the permission requirement? Maybe we could get around that by allowing such an appeal but then stoning to death any woman who files one? What are your thoughts? Thanks!”

            • Captain Button

               /  March 26, 2012

              I’m wondering if this ties in with the “child support should never exceed half the cost of an abortion” assertion.

              • I haven’t heard that one. Disgusting.

              • Really? Oh please tell me where that one is. I want to send someone a nicely worded letter.😉

                • Captain_Button

                   /  March 26, 2012

                  It is, or was, part of the standard rhetorical toolkit for mens’ rights arguments back when I was flirting with libertarianism in the 80s and 90s. It goes something along these lines:

                  Men and women are equal.

                  Women can get rid of a pregnancy if they want to, by getting an abortion.

                  Women can get rid of a baby if they want to by giving it up for adoption.

                  So men should have these rights too. They should be able to give up their parental rights and have their financial obligations limited to half the cost of an abortion. (Or half the medical expenses of pregnancy and delivery if they are pro-life.)

                  And based on his non-apology apology, yeah, he is using some mutant version of this argument:

                  Dick questioned whether a pregnancy, and the choice to end it, should belong solely to a woman. After all, he said, men have to pay for a child for 18 years.

                  “Yet if the woman chooses not to carry the child, all of a sudden it’s her individual personal choice,” he said. “I don’t think it’s really her pregnancy because it’s their pregnancy. And, if anything, the decision to have an abortion should be made not only by the woman but the man who is also involved. … If I thought that a man’s signature was required in order for a woman to have an abortion, I’d have a little more peace about it.”

                  • Yeah… I get the odd circular logic there. (Maybe.)

                    I’ve looked at libertarians and while some parts of it are agreeable, I can’t get beyond no public roads, no public schools, etc.

                    I think I’m doomed.

                    And lucky me, I’m too old to have any more babies, so I just have to this this guy (and this concept) is a jerk…

            • Good for you. Too bad it would be inadvisable to make fun of his name while you were at it.

            • taylor16

               /  March 26, 2012

              You really sent this? You’re my hero. Awesome.

              • Ian

                 /  March 26, 2012

                You should see the stuff I send to Don Young.

                • taylor16

                   /  March 26, 2012

                  Come to think of it, I did send an uber-sarcastic email to my Tea Party congressperson last fall (the debt ceiling crisis, perhaps? Or else maybe some extension of unemployment that they were threatening to block), telling them something like “while I know you are beholden to the anti-tax nutjobs who voted you in and don’t ACTUALLY give a crap about any of the struggling people who live in your district, perhaps you could do this one tiny thing for them. Let’s call it a Christmas gift of charity, since you like to pretend you’re religious to get votes.”

                  I didn’t get a constituent letter in response. So sad.

                  • Ian

                     /  March 26, 2012

                    The truth is, Don Young received my criticisms so stoically that I’ve been reduced to firing off the occasional “Fuck you, Donnie!” email. Which is much faster and feels about the same.

      • selenesmom

         /  March 26, 2012

        Dear Representative Dick:

        Since a woman carrying an unwanted pregnancy must be a slut, it follows that she probably doesn’t really know who the father is. Therefore, it stands to reason that if she wants to abort this baby, she should first ask permission from every man in the great state of Alaska, if not the United States of America! Just to be sure.

        Your friend,

        selenesmom

    • Well, at least it’s clear what their goals are now…

      But seriously, that’s one of the most disgusting proposals I’ve heard in a while. He’d ‘feel better’ knowing that women needed a man’s permission to get an abortion?

      • As I said on FB, either he doesn’t believe abortion is murder, or else it’s okay when a guy wants to kill his unborn child.

        • Captain Button

           /  March 26, 2012

          Is it time for me to drag out my snark about how when you look at what they advocate for, “Family Values” boil down to:

          1) Wives are the property of their husbands.

          2) Children are the property of their father.

        • Someone should suggest this to him at, oh say, a press conference or such forth. See what kind of answer he has for THAT.

          • Someone should. Ian?

            • Ian

               /  March 26, 2012

              I can’t imagine a state rep for Nenana ever holding a press conference unless there are felony charges involved.

      • Ian

         /  March 26, 2012

        That’s only the second most sexist comment I’ve heard from an Alaska state rep. Mike Kelly, formerly my rep (I moved, he’s still in), wins with his argument against strengthening protections for victims of domestic violence:

        “It just seems to me that the message is clear here, that the female — the other half of the population — is falling down because they’re doing stupid things marrying the beasts among us, or shacking up with them. The guys that are brothers and uncles and fathers and stuff are not taking care of this problem. I just think it’s one more thing that insidiously is on government, and it bothers me.”

        On the one hand, he (like Dick) was pretty thoroughly called out on that by his peers and the press. On the other, he’s still in office.

      • taylor16

         /  March 26, 2012

        Yeah. That almost bothers me more than just flat-out opposing abortion.

        So you’re okay with abortion as long as a woman gets her owner-husband’s permission first? That’s incredibly sexist.

    • Electronic_Neko

       /  March 26, 2012

      In a similar vein, Wisconsin GOP legislators are proposing a bill that suggests single parenthood is leads to child abuse: http://www.thenation.com/blog/167037/wisconsin-gop-legislators-go-after-single-mothers

      One of the sponsoring senators is quoted as saying that the rise of children being raised by single parents is mainly “the choice of women,” so apparently he doesn’t give much credit to the men out there impregnating women outside of marriage.

      • I saw that one. Guess two parents of the same gender are just fine.

        • The Law of Unintended Consequences is a merry prankster.

        • Electronic_Neko

           /  March 26, 2012

          Well, the bill provides for the dissemination of “educational and public awareness materials and programming that emphasize …..the role of fathers in the primary prevention of child abuse and neglect. ”

          So I guess two women with a child would have no idea how to avoid child abuse or neglect? On the other hand, two men raising a child should have that completely under control.

          • Captain Button

             /  March 26, 2012

            What about Three Men and a Baby?

      • SWNC

         /  March 26, 2012

        By all means, let’s punish the parents who are actually doing the work of raising their children.(I do not personally know any women who are single mothers by choice, and that definitely informs my reaction.)

        • Electronic_Neko

           /  March 26, 2012

          My favorite part is where another sponsor of the bill suggests that women in abusive marriages should stick with their husbands, because clearly an abusive marriage still provides a better environment for a child than living with a single mother.

      • baiskeli

         /  March 26, 2012

        Well, I see their point. I saw a poster about the harm that children of single women sustain, and the subsequent difficulties they have in becoming productive members of society. Said poster had 2 photos said children (Bill Clinton and President Obama).

        On a more serious note, Wisconsin GOP are fnucking idiots.

      • taylor16

         /  March 26, 2012

        “One of the sponsoring senators is quoted as saying that the rise of children being raised by single parents is mainly “the choice of women,”

        So dudes are supposed to have sex with whoever they want willy-nilly with their insurance-provided Viagra, and women can’t have contraception or abortions, but if they wind up getting pregnant and having a baby as a single mother it’s their choice and theirs alone?

        That makes sense.

        • Just in case it wasn’t abundantly clear that they’re living in a fantasy world.

        • wearyvoter

           /  March 26, 2012

          I wonder if he includes women who were married, had kids, then were widowed and decided that circumstances would be much more stable if they did not remarry. (Also, per my mom, who was widowed at just shy of 40 and left with 4 kids ranging in age from 9 to 15, you’re not exactly date bait when you have two teenagers and two preteens.)

      • Bringing me right back to the little post that could (111,016 views and counting!), in which I asked the GOP if they actually, liike, know how babies are made.

        ‘Cause: Dude.

  6. Last night I posted a bit about one of the earliest forms of the highball, the Mamie Taylor:

    http://cocktailchem.blogspot.com/2012/03/classic-cocktails-mamie-taylor.html

    Using real ginger syrup is the key to amping up what would otherwise be a slightly mundane drink. That and some smokey scotch.

  7. Rebecca Zicarelli

     /  March 26, 2012

    The copyright wars: trolls, hypocrites, and unprotected intellectual property rights.

    So guess what? On-line, knitters are every bit as trolly and rude as everyone else. Which leads to the copyright wars: fashion designs are not copyright protected, which feeds our world of cheap knock-offs. It’s perfectly legal. Knitting patterns are copyright protected, but only the words and photographs; someone can’t sell your pattern claiming it’s theirs.

    On ravelry, this is a big deal, because many knitters want to make things and sell them; and many pattern designers think they should get a small stake in that, so they offer what’s called a cottage license (of dubious legality, too,) based on software licensing — if you use this for personal use, great. Commercial use requires a license.

    So there are hordes of knitters who defend their rights (probably falling on the side of actual copyright law) to do whateverthefuck they want with their knit objects. “The designer got paid,” they say. Somehow, it was making my spidey senses tingle, that part of my brain that used to be an investigative reporter. So I investigated. I looked at the ‘designer got paid’ crowds libraries and projects, and compared them to the pattern data base. This took a long time.

    And guess what? The defenders of rights of knitters hardly ever knit paid-for patterns. They mostly knit the freebies; like 99% of the time. They’re claiming ‘the designer got paid,’ claiming pattern support time from the designer when they’ve troubles, and not supporting independent designers at all.

    Sigh.

    No wonder it’s so hard to make a living with creative processes in this country; we’ve such a culture of taking advantage.

    Now get your government hands off my medicare.

    • The comment sections at ravelry are enough to tell you the knitters are trolly awful people. it why I never comment there.
      On the other hand, I am spending $9 on a pattern book that contains the purse I want to make for myself, rather than try and reverse engineer it from pictures.
      I Is A Good Person!

      • depends on the pattern though, doesn’t it? Some people just re-write simple patterns and charge for them. I think that’s unrealistic.

        • This is a complex pattern. The ones i make up are usually simple and are variations on other’s people’s ideas. I would never copyright that. That would be weird.

      • Rebecca Zicarelli

         /  March 26, 2012

        You is.

        Me? My bad person. My hunt out hypocrites and reveal them. My bad. Shun me.

    • Knitters can be just as jerky as anyone else… as I’ve seen being a knitter.

      I think if you spent a lot of time creating a pattern, you deserve to be paid.

      I do wonder at the people who re-write a pattern for a simple scarf (2×2 rib) and try and charge $5 for it. I think they’re fools.

  8. selenesmom

     /  March 26, 2012

    Disgusting animals news:

    Selene (the dachshund) is too food-oriented. Last night she ate not only her shrimp shells from the Old Bay Shrimp Boil, which were supposed to give her calcium, but also Sammy’s and Samantha’s.

    This disagreed with her, and caused vomiting all over the downstairs carpet (not, of course, the tiled area) as well as the bed (while we were all asleep in it).

    How to not wake up.

    • Wow, I thought only cats had that kind of selective aim. 😦

    • Ian

       /  March 26, 2012

      Heh. Sunday morning I woke up just in time to direct Scout’s vomit off of the bed and onto the carpet.

      • selenesmom

         /  March 26, 2012

        Dachshunds, as a breed, are notorious for having no sense about what they eat. Ten years ago, I got up at 3 am and discovered that young Sammy had eaten an entire rotisserie chicken carcass out of the garbage. He had his stomach pumped and we bought a new, more dog-proof garbage can. The X-rays from this adventure still give me chills.

        • Yep. I once house-sat for a pair of dachshunds, which required me to go out in the back yard and pick up their poop. Otherwise they would eat it.

      • Indeed. There’s always the mad rush in the office to try to get Sky *outside* before he hits paydirt. (Of course, today he’s merely distributing some really deadly gas.)

        • Ian

           /  March 26, 2012

          I knew she truly felt bad because she didn’t immediately scarf down the vomit.

            • selenesmom

               /  March 26, 2012

              A quick reminder that canine social hierarchies are situational, unlike primate hierarchies, which appear to attach to the person. So in our home, roughly speaking, Samantha is in charge of chasing and retrieving things, Sammy is in charge of defending things and humping things, and Selene is in charge of food.

              This means that if Selene does not immediately consume her own magical vomit, she will stand over it and defend it, even if both other dogs have pointedly decided to ignore it and pretend to be paying attention to something else, such as an imaginary bug.

              • taylor16

                 /  March 26, 2012

                That’s awesome.

                I must say, as a dog owner, one of the most unsettling things is coming home to a spot on the carpet where someone has obviously vomited, but where only the trace outlines of vomit still exist.

                Those are not the days when they get to lick me hello.

                • The way we know when His Cat is about to vomit (he noises are so soft we can’t hear them) is when FatOne eagerly starts following her around in anticipation of prewarmed slightly digested second breakfast.

                  • wearyvoter

                     /  March 26, 2012

                    Are you sure FatOne doesn’t have some baby bird DNA somewhere in the gene pool. Also, ewwww.

                  • baiskeli

                     /  March 26, 2012

                    Eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!!!!!

            • wearyvoter

               /  March 26, 2012

              I’m glad I have a keyboard cover. That’s hilarious!

    • The worst thing I have ever woken up to was explosive cat diarrhea in the kitchen.

      • baiskeli

         /  March 26, 2012

        That made me laugh!

        Cats, being carnivores, rarely fart, but when they do. Whoah! My wife and I were sitting in the living room and this insanely foul smell (like a cross between 40,000 year old zombie and rotten fish ) hits us like a ton of bricks. Our cat had farted. Of course my wife turns to me and asks “Did you fart!”.

        • My current roommate’s dog is a farter. Malamute farts have power at a distance.

        • FatOne gave himself gas once by eating butter. The smell was godawful, but his confusion and distress by the noise coming out from under his tail was worth it’s weight in comedy gold.

          • My friend’s dog once ate the can of leftover bacon grease that had been steadily filling up on top of the stove. Came back out both ends.

        • I had no idea cats farted at all until we got our cat.

          I also had no idea how often cats puke, particularly long-hairs, or the distinctive toilet-plunging noise they often make before they do, or that some of them have bulimia, or inhale their kibble without chewing it at all so it comes back up entirely intact, or that if their food was particularly rich they could clear not just the room but the entire apartment with one dump, or that they occasionally use the kitchen rug as toilet paper.

          I miss having an outdoor cat.

          • baiskeli

             /  March 26, 2012

            Our older cat, who is long haired, pukes more than the younger short haired one. It’s probably because when they clean themselves they get hair. At least he has the good sense to puke only on hard surfaces.

            • The long hair is definitely a factor. I mean, one on top of the bulimia and the not-chewing-food and whatever stupid tummy upset is the problem now. It is rather alarming when he horks up something that looks like a newborn kitten, but it means he’s slightly less likely to puke in the next 48 hours, so that’s all good.

              Well, moderately good, anyway.

    • My SIL has trained the vomiter dog to run to the bathroom and throw up on the tile, after dragging him from the bed one too many times before he could toss his cookies all over it.

      I think she’s magic.

      • Electronic_Neko

         /  March 26, 2012

        That’s just impressive. My cat will always choose to vomit on the hardest-to-clean available surface. So, my clothes > carpet > wood floor. But then, he’s a cat.

        • Purrbot once worked it out so she stopped and vomited on every step between the first floor and the basement. It would have been impressive if i didn’t have to clean it.

          • Electronic_Neko

             /  March 26, 2012

            Wow. That must’ve taken some determination.

          • taylor16

             /  March 26, 2012

            I came home once to bloody diarrhea in NINE SEPARATE LOCATIONS in our house.

            From a 100-pound dog.

            She was very sick, so obviously I was more worried about her than anything, but once she was obviously going to be fine I was not at all amused about the game of “find the poop” she sent us on.

            It was February, and we kept the windows open for 24 full hours.

        • David L

           /  March 26, 2012

          My parents’ cat, who has binge-and-purge and hairball issues, has been known to run inside from the backyard just so that she can puke on the carpet. I once tried to put her on the kitchen tile when she was doing the “uh-oh, here it comes!” meows, but she snuck over just far enough to put her head above the carpet.

          • Electronic_Neko

             /  March 26, 2012

            Hah. Like I said, cats. I’d like to meet someone who could train a cat to puke in the most convenient area. I’m still impressed and jealous that someone could train a dog to do it, though.

    • Schatzi, the dachshund with whom I grew up and who was and will always be The Best Dog Ever, once ate an entire pound of candy corn. In the car. While we were watching the Canadian geese land on some lake. That was at some distance from our home.

      Meaning that we then had to drive all the way home in the car into which she had vomited the pound of candy corn.

      It was like a tenth of her body weight!

    • doginajacket

       /  March 26, 2012

      I have awakened early on a Saturday morning to puking at the head of the bed.

      Me (with half-hearted hope): Is there any way we can just cover that with a towel and go back to sleep?

      SO: No.

      PS: We have adopted a new puppy, so I am sure there are plenty of disgusting animal moments in my near future.

      • Congrats!

        (On the new family member, not the future disgusting animal moments.)

      • taylor16

         /  March 26, 2012

        Congrats on the new puppy!!!

        Puppies are so cute that even the gross moments are cute. Right?🙂

        • Ian

           /  March 26, 2012

          You mean like the time we put all four puppies into the same big kennel and drove them 30 miles away to get fixed and when we arrived they were all soaked with vomit? Or the time (about an hour later) when Delroy unleashed a river of diarrhea onto the vet’s stack of tax documents?

  9. caoil

     /  March 26, 2012

    So yesterday went somewhat well. We started late, as the tv was acting up and not turning on. Had to watch FOTR on my laptop, which was passable but not great (especially since it had to be regular DVDs, not Blu-ray). Partner was growling about the tv not cooperating, of course, right on the day we actually need it to. So I told her, then go over the bridge & find us a new one. We did some very cursory looking online (…not how we usually buy a large item), and I sent her off to look at two, one that was $219 and another at $249. She came home with the $249 one, a 32″ Dynex, and we popped it up on the stand in place of the Deceased Telly and it looks good. Had to secure it with straps before we went to bed as the Very Bad Kitten likes to climb on things and I really didn’t want it to go crashing to the floor in the night.

    Two friends entirely bailed on coming. Bah! Fie on them! The one guest we did have is a very sweet young lady but she’s also a Movie Talker, which is one of my pet peeves. I mean, in a movie I don’t care much about, fine, make some commentary here and there, but if I wanted to be having a conversation, then we wouldn’t be watching a movie! Anyways. I was glad she came, regardless, because her stepmom tells me she doesn’t get out much to socialize.

    But I still would’ve liked the option, in an ideal world, to be watching with those among you who would be interested.

  10. JHarper2

     /  March 26, 2012

    Awesome Doctor Post.
    Last week I was in my Kidney Doctor’s (Nephrologist) Office. On the wall where the graduation certificates usually are, he had framed a letter. The letter was from the Doctors of the Hospital’s Emergency Department. Twenty nine of the Emerg Docs had written him a letter to thank him for the way he interacted with Doctors, Staff and patients in their department. They praised his care, his patience, and the promptness and kindness with which he responded to requests for consults and aid.

    When I mentioned how gratified he must be by the letter, he said that doctors just don’t do that kind of thing for each other and getting such a letter was like getting a Nobel Prize.

    First of course I am glad that he is my doctor. Second, if someone you know or work with is doing a good job or is a good person: Tell them, write it down, praise them up! Every once and a while, Let the Good Guys win. There are as we know, enough reasons to be weary and to despair, but there is light in the world.

    • caoil

       /  March 26, 2012

      That’s lovely!

      (p.s. – you’re a good person :-))

    • Captain Button

       /  March 26, 2012

      Yeah I have an “egoboo” folder of a few things like this which I troll through when I am feeling more useless than usual.

    • watson42

       /  March 26, 2012

      I’ve been trying to do this more frequently, particularly with the bad economy and the general precariousness of employment. So I send letters to people who are doing a good job and send one to their manager.

    • SWNC

       /  March 26, 2012

      That’s so nice! Every once in a while, one of my college kids tells me “You do a great job” or “You’re always so helpful.” Coming from 20 year olds (who are usually pretty self-absorbed, which is both developmentally normal and frustrating), that really means a lot, and it always makes my day.

    • taylor16

       /  March 26, 2012

      That’s awesome!! I’m glad you have such a great doctor.

      I got a thank you email from a patient last week – he also sent a copy to the doctors I bill for. That was much appreciated. And I still have a thank-you card from another patient hanging on the bulletin board above my desk.

      So yes. Give accolades to people who treat you well! If nothing else, it will brighten their day. There’s nothing quite like opening an email or some mail, figuring it’s going to be another task you have to complete … only to find a kind note instead.🙂

    • Dex

       /  March 26, 2012

      Co-sign. On Friday afternoon, my wife and I left town to attend retirement festivities for a friend and mentor who served on both of our doctoral committees. He’s one of the kindest, most humble people I’ve met while in academia and he’s also arguably the biggest star from an academic standpoint. It just goes to show that one can have tremendous success without being an asshole.

      It really was quite amazing, and he was completely overwhelmed. People flew in from around the country to wish him well, some even taking a red-eye flight to make it. Former students and colleagues from around the world sent in stories and letters of thanks. Just to put it in perspective, people from his former job, which he had left 15 years earlier, sent a slide presentation of his time there.

      He’s known his wife since they were both ~five years old and they’re still googly moogly in love. By the time we’d woken up after collapsing in bed after our return drive home, he’d already sent us a note of thanks for coming.

      Throughout most of his career, his email sig was:

      “To love what you do and know that it matters, what could be better?”
      –Katharine Graham

    • Aww, I like that! THat was so sweet!

  11. dmf

     /  March 26, 2012

  12. BTW: I did not not go to the reason rally. I went to a cake show instead. Far more spiritually fulfilling.

    • I didn’t go either, nor did I go to the Trayvon Martin rally or anything else. Too busy being exhausted and sick to stand in the rain for any reason. (Pun semi-intended.)

  13. I’m going to go a little rambly here so hopefully you guys can indulge me.

    First of all, I’m confident that the PPACA will withstand this legal challenge. It is an incredibly weak case that is being brought against it, and dismantling it on the grounds that it is being challenged would open the door to basically unraveling American society. I realize that the justices are usually pretty craven about this sort of thing, and Bush v. Gore proved that the dominant wing of the court isn’t really that concerned about intellectual consistency when it comes to heated partisan battles, but I don’t think they’ll be willing to open that can of worms.

    Anyway, as I think about PPACA I always think about this:

    which, in my mind, is Movement Conservatism boiled down to its core essence. I Got Mine, Fuck You-ism without even the veneer of compassion to try to make it palatable. Movement Conservatism has essentially no answer for the disabled and the chronically ill in this country except to attempt to wish them out of existence. These are people the most in need of collective action, and the conservatives have written collective action (non-military variety) out of the story of America. I spent part of my weekend interacting with a program, funded with ARRA money (that’s the stimulus plan, aka the First Death of Freedom in America) that provides low-cost communications help for the deaf and hard of hearing. Communicating with the wider world when you’re deaf can be tricky, and a lot of deaf people, quite frankly, end up falling through the cracks. This is a program that attempts, in a sort of broad, shotgun-blast way, to deal with part of that problem. But it’s someone’s tax money being used to help someone other than them.

    None of this is a lament. I love this country. I fight the battles I do to destroy these people, that is all.

    • I hope you’re right. Every time I see someone complaining about being forced to buy insurance I want to ask “Where are YOU gettting your healthcare from?” But life’s too short to spend it arguing with idiots.

      • It’s not going to be a slam-dunk, 9-0 vote, because first that’s not the way the court operates with stuff like this and second there are people on the court who are in fact dedicated to rolling back decades of settled American case law. Ultimately, what I find hard to imagine is a court where 5 people look at the weak-ass argument that the plaintiffs have brought and come down on their side, considering the potential upheaval of so many things that were settled a long time ago that would cause. On one level, there’s a degree of poetic justice here, in that the conservatives are banking on “judicial activism” to do the job of convincing the American people that their cause is righteous. But I don’t think that the SC decision will mark the end of this chapter. I think this is the weakest way, practically speaking, for conservatives to attack this law, and the “death by a thousand cuts” strategy would/will be more effective in actually doing harm to it. They’re up against the “Medicare clock”, in that the longer they take to do damage to it, the more people will get used to it and not actually want them to damage it.

        • osbenz

           /  March 26, 2012

          Ultimately, what I find hard to imagine is a court where 5 people look at the weak-ass argument that the plaintiffs have brought and come down on their side, considering the potential upheaval of so many things that were settled a long time ago that would cause.

          Yeah, this is my sentiment as well. Kennedy in particular. And once Roberts sees that the cause is lost he’ll join the majority too. 6-3 final. I’d wager a couple quarters on that.

          • Thomas and Alito seem like completely solid votes for the plaintiffs. Ginsburg, Sotomayor, Breyer and Kagan seem solid for the defendants. I actually think Roberts, Kennedy, and Scalia are at least nominally in the air. At the very least, Gonzales v. Raich is going to give Scalia pause before he makes his decision. Between 5-4 for and 7-2 against sits the realm of possibilities.

      • taylor16

         /  March 26, 2012

        “But life’s too short to spend it arguing with idiots.”

        Amen.

        I feel bad sometimes, because I really do have the knowledge to argue health care policy stuff with people. And occasionally I will.

        But often, I just get weary and discouraged with the “I’ve Got Mine; Fuck You” crowd, and I just can’t do it. I … just … can’t.

        I really hope Craig is right. Obamacare is not perfect, by a longshot, but we need it as a starting point. I am a little terrified, frankly.

        • Ian

           /  March 26, 2012

          Let us hope that Craig is better at predicting SC decisions than he is at picking brackets.

          • taylor16

             /  March 26, 2012

            Oh god, now I’m nervous. Because I am pessimistic, and I correctly picked the Final Four!!!

            • Ian

               /  March 26, 2012

              And I don’t have a clue how this will turn out, and my bracket is 20th out of 21! Correlation established!

          • My final game is intact. Intact!

          • Expletive deleted Michigan State. Had them winning the whole shebang.

            But then, despite this, I am no longer last.

            • Ian

               /  March 26, 2012

              After the first round massacre, I am very happy to have come in not-last.

            • dave in texas

               /  March 26, 2012

              Hey, my pick for national champion was eliminated in its first game by a ^&*$#@)($ 15 seed.

              Said the guy below Ian in last place.

  14. stephen matlock

     /  March 26, 2012

    I never have written down exactly how I ended up here. Perhaps that belongs in a different place.

    • Ian

       /  March 26, 2012

      Presumably your father refused to sign the permission slip.

      • Liked.

      • HEY.

        The student lounge allows for video clips! It is as awesome as it can be! It is just as God made it!

        ETC.

        • Ian

           /  March 26, 2012

          (It was an Alan Dick reference.)

          • Oh that’s right. Sorry. I thought you were going for “your parents forgot to sign the slip so you can’t go on the field trip and have to stay in the library.” Like, you know, at school.

            I’m very tired. Have I mentioned that? Very tired.

  15. Neocortex

     /  March 26, 2012

    *sigh* A couple of days ago at OWS, the NYPD arrested a 16 year-old girl of color for marching in the street. There were reports that her arm was broken, though I haven’t seen confirmation on that. Somehow, during the arrest, they managed to rip her shirt open such that her whole front was covered only by her bra, and then they carried her screaming and crying down the road with her front still exposed.

    Her name is on the Internet, as are photos and videos of the arrest – I watched the arrest video – but I’m reluctant to name her, or link to photos and videos of her without her face being blurred/blacked out, because she’s a child, and was exposed in public. Unfortunately I don’t know how to do video editing.

  16. watson42

     /  March 26, 2012

    I want to thank everyone for their words of support the other day. It is much appreciated. Turns out things are even more complicated than I thought. My cousin is self-employed, so no health insurance. And it turns out you can’t enroll in a clinical trial here without having health insurance. Weirdness.

    • dmf

       /  March 26, 2012

      sadly there are massive liability issues with clinical trials, universal care anyone…

      • watson42

         /  March 26, 2012

        I guess I never thought about it because the clinical trials I’ve been involved with (from the planning/execution side), it hasn’t been an issue….but the trials have all been in Europe i.e. universal health care. There are all kinds of reasons biotech/pharma conducts clinical trials outside the US, but it didn’t occur to me that health insurance might be one of them.

        • dmf

           /  March 26, 2012

          IRBs (review boards) in the states are all about 2 things being within govt statutes and not getting sued, patient care and life issues not so much

  17. dmf

     /  March 26, 2012

    Nathan Englander talks with Zadie Smith:

  18. R_Bargis

     /  March 26, 2012

    Day 4 of dog sitting is going well. The border collie has that “I LOOOOOOOOVE YOU” look in his eyes 100% of the time so I feel guilty every time I don’t play fetch with him or pet him or loooooove him back, but his constant excitement (especially for going on walks) is infectious.

    Living in the suburbs, on the other hand, is weird and lonely. There are NEVER any people around. After years of city life it feels like I’m in a ghost town. Where are all the kids?

    • David L

       /  March 26, 2012

      There are NEVER any people around.

      I’ve always found that to be the great irony of the suburbs. The designers took all of these steps to make the environment more pleasant for people who are stepping outside their front door and then everyone uses their fenced-in backyards and doesn’t walk anywhere because there isn’t anything close enough to be able to walk to.

      Sometimes, it feels like suburb design has tapped some kind of deep desire to live in one’s own private fortress. As time goes by, the street-facing windows in new developments seem to be getting smaller and smaller and the fences more opaque and sturdier.

      • aaron singer

         /  March 26, 2012

        I live in an older, close-in suburb (founded 1872), most of the homes on the block were built in the 50s-60s and it’s relatively compact and on a grid. In the last 10-15 years a large number of young families have moved on the block, and there are a ton of kids around. When I was growing up, there were maybe 5 or 6 kids on the block. Now, there are dozens, and they often run around, play across lawns, go back and forth between houses; and a few of those young parents built benches (bolted down) so they can sit outside while their kids play around. It’s a sight I love to see, however unusual it is–and I think of how lucky those kids are in having one another, as opposed to the few friends/playmates I had when I was that age.

        • Bookwoman

           /  March 26, 2012

          This was our experience as well, in a close-in suburb where we lived for 25 years. When we first moved in in the mid-’80s, right after we got married, it was mostly older people, including some original owners (our particular neighborhood was built in the late ’40s, but the area as a whole has housing from the late 19th c. on). There were some kids in the neighborhood when our children were small, but nothing in comparison to what it’s like now: nearly all young families. I too loved seeing all those babies and young children. The neighborhood is also great because it’s a 10-minute walk to a nearby shopping center and the commuter rail that takes you into the city. 20 minutes and you’re downtown.

          I do think there’s a big difference between old, inner-ring suburbs like yours and mine and the newer exurban sprawl.

          • R_Bargis

             /  March 26, 2012

            When my parents moved from West Virginia in 1992 we moved into a suburb built in 1973-75. Almost all the original owners’ kids were in middle or high school and there were only two other kids my age in the whole neighborhood, neither of whom I really liked, so I spent a lot of time playing by myself. In the last ten years most of the original owners, long empty nesters, have gradually sold their homes and moved out, and families with kids of all ages have replaced them. It feels like a much livelier place and in the evenings you hear people on their back porches or kids running up and down the sidewalks.

            That suburb is old enough that there are sidewalks on both sides of the streets (even the cul-de-sacs), and the sidewalks don’t stop at the subdivision but continue on for miles and miles to the schools and parks and strip malls because the whole zip code was developed at once. Out in the ’90s exurb I’m house-sitting in the main road of the subdivision has a sidewalk on one side, but when you leave the there’s no sidewalk to the subdivision down the road, or even to the elementary school around the corner. It makes biking as an adult hazardous – I wouldn’t be enthusiastic about letting my 10 year old go for three mile bike rides to the ice cream stand with the roads as large and busy as they are and the shoulders and sidewalks so piece-meal. By the time I hit middle school I had the freedom to bike to the Goodwill, the pool, the arcade, or the library, but in exurbs like this it must be a lot harder to safely give your kids the freedom to explore on their own before they’re old enough to drive.

  19. David L

     /  March 26, 2012

    Today is a major deadline to fill out a certain form for the end users of the web application I’m responsible for.

    Meanwhile, the people responsible for telling me what should be on that form keep finding changes they want to make. Most are typographical, but some are the sort of thing that I should have been told about when I started asking for this information months ago. As a result, morale is not very high at the moment.

  20. efgoldman

     /  March 26, 2012

    RE: Trayvon Martin.
    This is both very sad and very clever (via copyranter)

    • efgoldman

       /  March 26, 2012

      Also too: Whence cometh yon Avatar? Do existing Gravitars not work on this version of WP?

    • baiskeli

       /  March 26, 2012

      That is cute and so profoundly sad at the same time.

      I tweeted a photo of myself wearing a hoodie. Sadly, a hoodie still does not make me photogenic.

      On a more serious note, in the most recent thread at TNC’s place, I wondered how long it would be before Obama’s words on Trayvon Martin were twisted by the right wing and possibly the Republican candidates. I wasn’t surprised by the right wingers, but I was surprised how fast by Gingrich and Santorum went there. Also, Bachmann has joined them

      Also, the latest from the right wing blogsphere is speculation that Trayvon Martin was a drug dealer.

      • taylor16

         /  March 26, 2012

        Yeah, I saw that. He had an empty baggie?

        But Zimmerman’s domestic violence case in 2005 is no big deal.

        Kid possibly maybe smoking pot = deserves to be shot.

        Guy with a history of violence shoots a kid = nice guy who doesn’t deserve to be arrested.

        I swear, I hate this case more every single day.

        • watson42

           /  March 26, 2012

          I too hate this case more with each passing day.

          It seems like the internet discussions about this took a turn for the crazy over the weekend. Looking online today, it seemed like all the talk was about how it’s self-evident that black people = thugs and that Martin provoked Zimmerman and explaining away (or outright ignoring) the fact that the police didn’t do any real investigating until this became an issue.

          • osbenz

             /  March 26, 2012

            It seems like the internet discussions about this took a turn for the crazy over the weekend.

            I’ll suggest that that is the Obama effect so many were rightly worried about. But, then, that was inevitable given that no arrest has been made. That’s the only way this could have been deescalated.

            • efgoldman

               /  March 26, 2012

              It is, in fact, the Obama Effect(R).
              But the thing is, it brings out the absolute worst of the stupid, and the only people who believe that snit are the 27% who would gargle Drano before they’d vote for Barack, anyway. And the volume of the vitriol eventually leaks from the depths of the WingNut blogosphere out into the general population, which has clearly chosen the president’s side of the issue, and drives more and more voters toward the Dems.
              See also: Contraception, opposition to…

              • osbenz

                 /  March 26, 2012

                Yeah, I think you got the politics right. I’m less confident about the policy ramifications.

              • baiskeli

                 /  March 26, 2012

                From a CNN poll, 75% of Americans believe Zimmerman should be arrested, so that would support your theory.

        • baiskeli

           /  March 26, 2012

          But Zimmerman’s domestic violence case in 2005 is no big deal.

          Wait what…..!

          OK, back from Googling. All I can say is WTF!!!
          http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/03/21/2706141/trayvon-martins-shooter-had-a.html

          • taylor16

             /  March 26, 2012

            Yeah, basically.

            These right-wingers are falling all over themselves trying to defend a guy who seems to be a paranoid maniac with anger issues … just so they don’t have to say that there might be a few people out there who shouldn’t carry guns.

            Pathetic.

      • selenesmom

         /  March 26, 2012

        Well he must have been a piss poor drug dealer then. Imagine that:

        Trayvon: “Skittles! Skittles! Skittles!”
        Zimmerman: “What are you doing here?”

    • I couldn’t help but do that at Target the other day – I bought a bag of Skittles, put it in front of the cashier and asked her not to shoot me.

      On a better note, these were new Skittles – Skittles Riddles. The colors don’t match the flavors. That kept us preoccupied for much of the evening. We are simple folk.

      • Dex

         /  March 26, 2012

        Skittles Riddles. Where, hopefully, it is just fun in the bag and not bullets riddling your body.

    • Oh that’s so sad… Very appropriate tho.

  21. watson42

     /  March 26, 2012

    @ taylor16: Can I ask about health insurance? My cousin was just diagnosed with Stage IV cancer. Best prognosis is 6 months to a year with treatment. He doesn’t have health insurance, being a self-employed artist. Right now he has an application pending with Medicaid and the NY Bridge Plan. He also plans on applying for SSI/disability. Is there something else he could be doing? Something he shouldn’t be doing? Hell, I’m not even sure what the right questions are to ask.

    • taylor16

       /  March 26, 2012

      Oh … I’m so, so, so, so sorry for your cousin. So sorry.

      The applications with state programs are job #1. Make sure that whenever he can get approved for them, he gets it approved retroactively as far back as he can go. I am no expert on that aspect of health care, but most hospitals have people on staff who can help with that kind of thing, and normally they will backdate Medicaid coverage by a few months if the patient started incurring costs before that. So while he has probably already done this, he will want to get hooked up with a sympathetic caseworker at the hospital or local disability office or something who can help guide him through the system.

      As for health coverage for now – how long has he been uninsured? If it’s more than 6 months, he should think about applying immediately for the NY Preexisting Condition plan:
      http://www.healthcare.gov/law/features/choices/pre-existing-condition-insurance-plan/ny.html

      I’m no expert on this plan either, but I believe that Rhialto’s wife is on it, so he may know details? Overall, though, the preexisting plans are decent. They won’t cover everything at 100%, but they will certainly – certainly – help him significantly with the bills (and to likely get better treatment as an insured patient, sad to say). I would apply immediately if I were him.

      If he hasn’t been uninsured for 6 months or more, I don’t know of another plan that he can apply for right now that would take him. Others living in NYC may know of a state plan that might work, though? Or else perhaps a call to the number at the link above would be a good idea anyway, just to see if they might have some suggestions.

      Oh man. Best wishes to your cousin.😦

      • watson42

         /  March 26, 2012

        Thanks so much for you input!! It really helps. We’ve been working on getting him an appt with an advocate and/or an attorney who knows health care law.

        As I mentioned the other day, this is all complicated by the fact that the person closest to him (geographically and emotionally) is my sister who is in the midst of a risky pregnancy and is supposed to be on bed rest. And of course she’s helping him out. I am trying to take deep breaths and not freak out. Too much. Thankfully there’s loud music. And the Horde.

  22. koolaide

     /  March 26, 2012

    Last week I noted my disappointment with the one of the local organizers for the coalition fighting the anti-same sex marriage state constitutional amendment in NC. After that mtg I was pretty discouraged about the state of the campaign against the amendment.

    I’m feeling a touch better about things today. I was at my church yesterday encouraging folks to GOTV (my church is officially against the amendment). And folks seemed to “get” that they needed to vote. The Protect All NC Families has also gotten some good “I’m against this” quotes from some known conservative folks in NC.

    NC has a good chance to fight & win IF the campaign can be funded properly so the message can get out there. I’ve heard through various grapevines that some of the larger organizations have written off the NC fight, mostly on the bigoted view that all southerners are hicks who hate. We’re not. And I hope the nat’l groups can quickly come to their senses. If any of you can help get out the word that NC has potential to win, that would be wonderful. The campaign has started using #firstinfight tag on twitter w/ the #voteagainst and #lgbt and related hashes. So if you’re pimping them via twitter

    • SWNC

       /  March 26, 2012

      *If* we can get enough people out to vote on May 8, we can defeat this thing. Most people polled oppose the constitutional amendment. Turn out is going to be key.

      And I’m seconding koolaide–help from outside the state is appreciated. Lord knows the anti-marriage people aren’t turning away outside funds.

      • koolaide

         /  March 26, 2012

        should I be encouraged that this week’s ActBlue moneybomb effort has raised 19k of the 25k goal in just one day? Or be worried that, as we all know, it’ll take way more than that to get ads on the air?

        my emotions on the chances for this campaign keep swinging from one extreme to the other. I’ve got to get myself under control.

      • ennstar

         /  March 26, 2012

        *facepalm*

        who the hell are these people? little rue was quite possibly the most adorable thing in the history of ever in that film.

        it’s not just ignorance, it’s being a monstrous sham of a human being.

      • baiskeli

         /  March 26, 2012

        Since I cannot edit, even more
        http://hungergamestweets.tumblr.com/

    • I refuse to read this because I already have too many dead brain cells, being over the age of 45 and all, BUT – I know what it’s about.

      And honest to blog people, all you had to do to know that Rue would be cast as black would be to read the book. Because the character is black.

      Indeed, those who argued against Jennifer Lawrence because Katniss is supposed to have “olive skin” had a genuine point. She fills the role so well that I (personally) am ok with it, but the point is there. There are probably some olive-skined actors who might have liked the gig.

      • baiskeli

         /  March 26, 2012

        I haven’t read “Hunger Games” (added to the list of books that I really want to read but won’t get to soon) but Racialicious covered the whole Katniss casting thing a while back. Who are these people!!

        This is my reason for giving people the side-eye when they proclaim blithely that racism will die out as old people pass away. The young can be just as bad (if not worse).

        I might actually watch the movie (I normally have a firm policy against watching a movie before I’ve read the book(s)) because a few people who’ve watched it have told me it’s pretty phenomenal.

        • What a crazy policy. I’d never watch anything.

          • baiskeli

             /  March 26, 2012

            What a crazy policy. I’d never watch anything.

            You seem to be laboring under the assumption that I’m rational.

            OK, so I don’t always stick to my rule, but I love that rule because when I read a book, I make up my own images. When I read a book after the movie, the images from the movie pollute my vision. I read The Relic, and it is a pretty scary book, they changed the movie and the movie sucked, it lacked the one single story element that moved the book beyond scary into the Holy cow, I don’t think I can sleep tonight! territory.

      • efgoldman

         /  March 26, 2012

        @ Emily
        I already have too many dead brain cells, being over the age of 45 and all…
        [This is a reply to Emily. Why is it down here? FYWP!]
        Well, I’m over 65. I’m not not using mine any more. Shall I FrdEx you a box of brain cells?

      • ennstar

         /  March 26, 2012

        yeah, jennifer lawrence owned the shit out of that role. when you’re casting the lead in a beloved franchise, you gotta make sure to get someone who is up to the challenge–and i think she more than proved her mettle.

        • ennstar

           /  March 26, 2012

          though it is certainly true that thg missed out on a good opportunity to be progressive about casting. again, i thought lawrence was excellent, so it didn’t end up bothering me, but that’s just my opinion.

          • This is where I’m at, too. I can’t argue with anyone who’s focused on the missed opportunity, but I do think she did an amazing job.

  23. stephen matlock

     /  March 26, 2012

    Can I suggest that anyone considering buying a Samsung product contact me so I can steer you straight on their customer service hell?

  24. osbenz

     /  March 26, 2012

    So, about an hour ago, I was officially been admitted to candidacy for my doctorate. Defense in 6 months or so. *sigh of relief*

  25. caoil

     /  March 26, 2012

    Before I forget, this is for Lobster: I copied the text of your comment from Friday into a (direct) FB message to my friend – I haven’t heard anything so far, but I will copy his response, if any, back to you in another open thread.

  26. In other news, Saturday was utterly gorgeous here in the NW and I got in a really nice bike ride that hit all five quadrants of the city (our naming conventions might have a couple of issues…). Even got the wind to work for me most of the time. Having a stiff tailwind on flat terrain is all kinds of fun. And after my first 50 mile ride in I don’t even know how long, I was feeling pretty good. All in all, it bodes well for training this spring and summer.

  27. baiskeli

     /  March 26, 2012

    Had a good weekend.

    Began reading The Warmth of Other Suns on Friday. I’m about halfway through, and it is really really good.

    Bike geekdom follows.

    Our saturday ride was a bit cold (40-50s) and not the 70-80F that we hit during the week, but it was still above average for this time of year. We did 45 miles.

    Went for an easy ride yesterday, and my rear spoke snapped (grrr). This is the 3rd spoke that’s snapped on my Easton EA90SL’s (2 on the back, one in front). They’re not even a year old. Bike shop sent them back to Easton to either relace or replace, but at this point, I pine for my old Mavic Ksyrium Elites that lasted 5 years (had to be replaced because the brake tracks were worn and the side of the rims had become paper thin). They gave me cheapo loaner wheels that ride like boat anchors (my wheels =1540g, loaner wheels =2000+g, funny how 500 grams of rotational mass make a difference). Hopefully I get my wheels back before my May road race.

    $699 wheels shouldn’t be this finicky, especially considering that the Mavic Ksyrium Elites I had were 100$ less and I never even had to true them in 5 years (including a couple of crashes, an emergency curb hopping or two etc).

    I’ve been going to hot Yoga with my wife (going this evening). It’s been great, though it’s pretty hard and I’m not exactly flexible.

    • Hot yoga sounds extremely dirty.

      • baiskeli

         /  March 26, 2012

        It’s not, but you leave aching in places you didn’t know you had muscles in. I’m a cyclist, meaning i end up having a body type similar to T-Rex (strong legs, vestigial upper body), so I need something that is whole body.

        Now hot yoga instructors ……..

    • Ian

       /  March 26, 2012

      $699 wheels shouldn’t be this finicky

      Ha! Ha ha ha ha ha! Ha! (Says the luddite who still builds his own 36-spoke wheels.)

      If the Ksyrium Elites worked that well for you, you should find another pair. I think I remember you being a not-heavy person, so the Eastons are crap if you’ve broken that many spokes. One spoke I could write off as random weirdness, but both wheels? Who breaks a spoke on a newish front wheel? It’s either a terrible design or they were build up poorly.

      Went for a nice trail ride on Sunday. My wife wanted to take the dogs someplace new, so I went ahead and led them through a different set of trails. Had to make way for a big team at one point (ten dogs), and found the snow next to the trail was chest deep. It was warm, though, like 25 degrees.

      • baiskeli

         /  March 26, 2012

        When I googled it, there were reports of a bunch of defective Sapim spokes used in a run of Easton EA90 wheels, so if they’re re-laced, hopefully that solves that.

        Your dispatches sound like something from another world. a team of sled dogs!? That actually sounds like fun (apart from the snow and 25 degrees)

        • Ian

           /  March 26, 2012

          Stainless steel spokes, son. 14 gauge, DB if you can afford it. 32 minimum. And I don’t want you riding anything with rims lighter than 420 grams. It’s not safe. Also, get off my lawn.

          • baiskeli

             /  March 26, 2012

            Next you’ll be recommending toe-clips over clipless. I’m running 9 speed Ultegra and all the cool kids look at me funny when I tell them I don’t have 10 speed.

    • Breaking that many spokes does sound unusual. It’s only anecdotal, but I’ve never broken a spoke on my Bontrager Selects, which are a) not terribly expensive wheels and b) have a pretty low spoke count.

      • baiskeli

         /  March 26, 2012

        Yeah, I’ve ridden it all, from Dura Ace Open pro, to aero wheels, and these are the first set of wheels I’ve ever snapped a spoke on, and I’ve been riding seriously for close to 20 years. I weigh 175-180 lbs, so I stay away from wheels that have a weigtht limit less than 225lbs, and gravitate towards wheels that don’t have any weight limit.

    • stephen matlock

       /  March 26, 2012

      I purchased “Warmth” – it’s sitting on my desk waiting to be opened. I had checked it out from the library last year, but didn’t finish it. I try to remunerate the authors of books I really, really like.

      But it’s a difficult book to read.

      • baiskeli

         /  March 26, 2012

        The narrative sections have me hooked. I’m actually finding it a very easy read.

        • stephen matlock

           /  March 27, 2012

          It was difficult because of what it made me think/feel. Having to root up yourself and your family to have a decent life. Not because of war or natural disaster or disease. But because your neighbors wanted your labor but didn’t want you.

          That was the part that got me. I ended up stopping half way. All I could think about was how ordinary people had to go to extraordinary journeys just to try to have a normal life.

  28. neighbors73

     /  March 26, 2012

    Did you ever just feel like there’s an anvil hanging over your head, for no good reason? That’s me today. I feel like I’ve forgotten something! Ugh!

    • wearyvoter

       /  March 26, 2012

      Been there. I visualize a rack full of shoes that’s about to cascade on my skull from a great height.

    • Captain_Button

       /  March 26, 2012

      Been laying any traps for roadrunners lately?

  29. wearyvoter

     /  March 26, 2012

    I’m having one of those days where I actually miss working in small market radio. Okay, so it was behind-the-scenes, writing ads and promos and PSAs. And I got out in the mid-1980s before Clear Channel and all of those megamonsters started swallowing up the smaller operations. But on a good day, it was about the most fun you could have. It was sometimes stressy and deadliney, and the pay hovered around subsistence level. Nonetheless, it had its moments. And sometimes you’d get advertising clients who would let you play with the form on their behalf, as long as the ad got people to show up at their business.