For the Horde! Open thread.

You know what to do! (Don’t forget: I’m super busy with work – if you get stuck in moderation, I’ll fish you out as soon as ever I can!)

Standard FYI clause: My rule of thumb is that I wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

229 Comments

    • Captain Button

       /  March 20, 2012

      It may experience some turbulence and then … explode.

    • Or you could go into deep geek land and learn how to paint them yourself.

      • It’s like we’ve never met.

        Hi Jordan! I’m Emily. I’m deeply lazy. Nice to meet you!

        • caoil

           /  March 20, 2012

          It’s not lazy! It’s Deeply Aware That There Are Only 24 Hours In A Day, Some Of Which Must Be Spent Sleeping, Leaving X-amount Of Hours For Everything Else—

          eh, never mind. Lazy’s fine. I’m right there with you being equally lazy.

            • Captain Button

               /  March 20, 2012

              “No boom today. Boom tomorrow. There’s always a boom tomorrow.”

              • what is this and why have i never seen this show before?

                • That, my friend, is Babylon 5.

                  • koolaide

                     /  March 20, 2012

                    It’s been a really long time since I watched Babylon 5.

                • Captain Button

                   /  March 20, 2012

                  Because it was back in the waning days of the 20th century, when the lights were going on all over the world.

                  There was a time it was my only reason for living.

                  • wearyvoter

                     /  March 20, 2012

                    Babylon 5 is the reason we subscribed to DISH network. (Because season 5, which had not been expected at all, happened, and it was available only on TNT.) Long before Twitter, and Facebook, and blogging, there was J.Michael Straczynski, showrunner, interacting with fans at Compuserve, Genie, AOL, and on Usenet. (B-5 is why I found Usenet.) If you were on those boards, you could follow along on the behind the scenes dramas wrt to renewals and such.

        • Just depends on what you think of as fun. It’s been years since I did much painting, but it’s a good winter activity. Some miniatures, an audiobook and a drink are a good way to pass some time inside.

          • (Also I’m really terrible at small tasks. I can’t even paint my own fingernails).

            • JHarper2

               /  March 20, 2012

              I suggest child labour. They have small hands for those delicate painting tasks.
              There has to be some use for them.

              • koolaide

                 /  March 20, 2012

                I would click a like button but there is not one…

                • It’s the bane of our existence here in the Student Lounge. On the other hand, we can post videos and images. So, you know, one hand takes, the other gives back.

                  Or sommat.

              • Well, there is that. I mean, whatever else might I be feeding them for?

                • koolaide

                   /  March 20, 2012

                  blueberry picking?

                  every time I go blueberry picking I revise my views on child labor laws.

              • wearyvoter

                 /  March 20, 2012

                Among other things, Canadian child labo(u)r is responsible for all of those extraneous “u”s.

    • Well, it is solid resin.

  1. Linkage: The Voice Recap–http://bit.ly/GBYGd9
    Also, for those who watched last night, no wonder Miranda chose to pee on Blake’s leg in front of Gwen, even though Erin was the one with the back story and obviously going to win:
    http://bit.ly/GBoEPO

    EW accidentally dates the first episode of Mad Men for us: http://bit.ly/GB3OMm

    and this week’s tunes are all Spring related, because duh, have you looked outside? http://bit.ly/GB8bYT http://bit.ly/GEnL74

    • GASP.

      Why on earth did you get shunted into moderation?

      DISQUS!

      Wait.

      I mean: FYWP!

    • There is no decent universe in which “the year your show is starting” can be considered a fucking spoiler. Matthew Weiner is the worst.

      • And you! Why didn’t WP want to let you in?!

        Gah.

        • It told me that I had to log in to access my regular comments, so I gave up (because I couldn’t figure out how or where to log in) and just linked it into my Twitter account, which I’ve never used here before.

        • caoil

           /  March 20, 2012

          I think WP is having troubles overall, because another on blog I visit the commenters were having issues too.

    • koolaide

       /  March 20, 2012

      I am clueless (despite watching the Voice last season) b/c I totally don’t know what “inappropriate behavior” you reference. I did try google but clearly my google-fu has taken the day off.

      • I’m talking about the Xenia-Dia and Blake leeeettle-too-close-for-comfort behavior.

        • koolaide

           /  March 20, 2012

          huh. I never picked up on that. /clueless viewer

  2. dmf

     /  March 20, 2012

  3. Captain Button

     /  March 20, 2012

    This looks like a job for Captain Equinox!

    [audio src="http://www.archive.org/download/Firesign_Theatre_Podcasting_001/jp_captainequinox_64kb.mp3" /]

  4. David L

     /  March 20, 2012

    I know that there’s the old saying about “never attribute to malevolence that which can be explained by incompetence”, but I’ve been pushed past my limit by the billing people for my orthopedist/physical therapist (they’re part of the same practice.)

    I got a bill yesterday for things dating back to January. 15 out of 16 items on the bill had an error in their favor — either they failed to credit me at all for payments made or fudged the adjustments so that an appointment worked out to a net of zero even though the insurance paid plus what I paid was more than the allowable amount. I shall be calling shortly and having a nice long chat, as soon as I’m armed with the confirmation numbers from my credit card statements.

    • helensprogeny

       /  March 20, 2012

      My sympathies. Having to suffer an injury is bad enough. Having to then fight with your doctor over money is literally adding insult to injury. Hope you get it cleared up soon, and with minimal pain.

    • Are you in touch with our own medical billing adviser?

      • David L

         /  March 20, 2012

        Not yet. I only got it yesterday. Also, I think I can get the receptionist to vouch for me on the payments that weren’t credited and, if they don’t budge on the adjustments thing, I’ll sic Blue Cross/Blue Shield on them.

    • David L

       /  March 20, 2012

      Update: It was, if not incompetence, at least delay. I don’t know why the recent payments were processed but the older ones weren’t (as of the day the bill was mailed), but they have been processed now, and I was so bamboozled by the fact that I apparently have both a bigger outstanding bill than I thought and a bigger credit than I thought that I don’t feel like arguing about the less-than-$5 per visit that they’re overcharging me.

      • taylor16

         /  March 20, 2012

        I am immensely late to the OTAN today, but if anything looks at all funny to you, post tomorrow and we can chat. I’m happy to offer advice and/or look over your bills myself for you.

        In general, when receiving a medical bill, assume there will be problems.😦

  5. Insomnia. We hates it.

    • Oh my good lord in heaven, we are with you on that. All day today, I keep thinking “imagine how much more I could get done if I actually slept at night?”

      • dmf

         /  March 20, 2012

        my kingdom for more than 5hrs straight sleep

      • Too bad we can’t spend our nights getting stuff done, since we’re awake anyway. I’ve actually reached that point where I’m like, “Sleep? What is sleep, and why do I need it?”

        • Captain Button

           /  March 20, 2012

          A totally inadequate substitue for caffeine.

          • Consider your post liked. (I don’t usually do caffeine, but I’m starting to wonder if it would push my biochemistry right around in a circle and help me sleep.)

            • David L

               /  March 20, 2012

              I’ve heard stories that if you get your stress hormones messed up enough, you reach a point where stimulants make you sleepy and depressants wake you up.

        • aaron singer

           /  March 20, 2012

          It’s where I’m a Viking.

    • The only thing worse than the insomnia is the other thing keeping me awake. The neighbors. They have taken to hanging out on their front porch (which faces my bedroom window) and talking/arguing/laughing loudly until 11pm or later.

      I’m hoping they say something embarassing so I can stop by the next day (so sorry to hear about your erectile dysfunction!) and maybe then they’ll knock it off. I need ammunition, no way they’ll stop just because some in the neighborhood sleep at night.

      • That sucks. My neighbors have a floodlight that shines right into my bedroom window (but it’s not always on) and their HVAC is incredibly loud for some reason (but it’s not always on either.) But at least they themselves, if not their possessions, are perfectly quiet.

        When I was in college I could sleep through any amount of ruckus. Wonder why I can’t do that now.

      • Aw, man. I have that going on right now, so many sympathies. (Although the current resident is still better than her predecessor who once invited all her friends over for an impromptu party, at midnight, on a Wednesday, outside my bedroom window, music blaring. She was very confused and angry when the cops showed up.)

    • So I’ve been taking Ambien to help with my insomnia. On Saturday I experienced hallucinations of such a strong nature that I have since doubted whether any memories I have from Saturday were real. I have found text messages on my phone sent by me that make no sense, stuff I ordered from Amazon that I clearly would have no reason to order, e-mails sent by me that are incomprehensible.

      I have entirely given up on any chemical sleeping aid as a result.

      I never took “drugs” through any part of life. (I have taken pain meds as prescribed for surgery & the like, but never a drug user.) It was simply a choice, not a moral lesson. But it means I never really experienced something akin to an altered mental state.

      That stuff scares me now.

      • When I had a couple of wisdom teeth taken out a few years ago, the oral surgeon fired up the nitrous oxide long before they started digging in my mouth. Over the 5-10 minutes that this was going on, I managed to go completely under, dreamed countless subtle variations on the room I was in, and came to *genuinely* convinced that I was in the wrong universe. Which is a bad feeling to have when there are bright lights and doctors staring down at you. Thankfully I managed to talk myself down and it all turned out alright, but that was hands down the most altered state I have ever been in.

        After it was all over, one of the attendants pointed at the nitrous oxide regulator and asked the oral surgeon “Isn’t that turned up kind of high?”

        I felt a lot better after I heard that.

      • O_O Good lord! That’s terrifying. Quite genuinely. Yikes!

      • I once tried the herb St. John’s Wort for depression/insomnia. It gave me REALLY weird dreams and a general mind-altered sensation for a few weeks. Then unfortunately it wore off.

        I’ve never been much of a one for drugs, and your story will remind me to stay off Ambien. There was an OTC sleep aid I was taking for a while, but it didn’t always work. Generally, I just don’t know. Stupid brain.

  6. mythopoeia

     /  March 20, 2012

    Finished A Feast for Crows this weekend and then, for kicks, found the threads where everyone was kicking around theories just before Dance came out last summer. Dudes, you all paid way closer attention to the family trees than I did. We’re supposed to know who Jon’s mother was at this point? (Please don’t say who she is since there are probably people who are like me and a book or two behind.)

    I’ve also realized that half the occurrences of the word or action “rape” in those books come not from descriptions of actual rape, but just from people reminding Brienne that because she’s a woman, she’s liable to be raped. Seriously. Every page from her POV. Left a sour taste in my mouth.

    • If you’re really paying attention, you could have guessed who Jon’s mother was from the first book.
      Or at least, Most of the people I know IRL who read the books (& in some cases listened to the book-on-ipod) did.
      Sorry.🙂

      • mythopoeia

         /  March 20, 2012

        Ah. Well, I’ll get to be pleasantly surprised at the big reveal, then, won’t I?

        • From my perspective, I think this is more interesting to know right now (like I said, I’m behind you in the series), and to think about how it will affect the story. But if you don’t want to know, then by all means, stick to that.

    • Wait, we’re supposed to know who Jon’s mother is? I’ve read “Dance” and I don’t know who his mom is. Crap.

      I feel like Martin has a hard time keeping track of everyone’s motivations and characters at this point in the saga, and has little cheat sheets that he refers to. So Arya bites her lips and Brienne gets rape-threats and so on.

      • Captain Button

         /  March 20, 2012

        We do not know definitely, but there is a widely accepted theory based on reading between the lines and analysing (or over-analysing) who said what, looking at the literal meaning of what was said and not said. As opposed to heresay and what people assume.

      • I know who people on the internet claim is responsible, but I am strug-diddly-uggling with finishing A Feast for Crows.

      • ADWD is the first one to hint really, really obviously on the surface loud and clear who Jon’s mother is. There are droplets buried in the other four books but the most recent is the one that takes those tiny bites of information and makes them Very Likely Indeed.

        I don’t want to give spoilers though. Hmm. How to hint. Well. He is always described as having strong Stark features…

        • It comes back to Ned. There’s one thing about Ned that stands out above all other things. Then there is this mistake that he supposedly made that betrayed this aspect of his personality. Then if you assume that his “stepping off the path” was a story that was concocted for the sake of someone he loves, it sort of crystallizes very easily who the mother was. Of course, then there’s the other question that that leaves….

          • That other question also has really, REALLY strong hints in the text, though I don’t remember at which point (in which book) so it’s possible you’re not there yet.

            • If the internet is telling me the truth, then that could at least make for a potentially interesting end-game, and justify a lot of the time I’ve spent of boring fucking Jon Snow.

        • How’s this?
          Stop asking who Jon’s mother is.

          Start asking who Jon’s father is.

          • Snerk – I haven’t read any of the books and I know who his parents are. Obviously I’m not spoilerphobic…

        • I know, there are all these *hints* about the Dead Little Sister. But I’m usually very bad at these sort of guesses, and I’m just going to wait until there’s a big reveal. Also, now my mind is wandering off on paternity tests in the mediaeval era. No wonder they put so much emphasis on chastity for women. #anthromajorswhatwhat

  7. Just so it doesn’t seem like I’m keeping information from you people, today is the day, lo those many years ago, that a certain unremarked-upon fetus emerged from its mother’s womb and became an unremarked-upon person with a penchant for dirty words and dick jokes and making fun of other people for petty, often counter-intuitive reasons.

    • I wish you the most normal of unremarked days (with cake. Because no matter what, there should always be fucking cake).

    • helensprogeny

       /  March 20, 2012

      OMG, you’re an equinox baby. I don’t know what, if anything, that means. But happy birthday.

    • caoil

       /  March 20, 2012

      Awww.
      Cake! Much cake for you! (or, I guess pie, if you prefer it to cake)

    • One wishes that person an unremarked-upon day. With some kind of cake.

    • efgoldman

       /  March 20, 2012

      What? Itrs ot my birthday.

    • SWNC

       /  March 20, 2012

      Happy birthday, you!

    • Yes, I know today is Big Bird’s birthday. But that doesn’t mean we should reveal his true behind the scenes nature for all to know.

      • I feel like this is a thing that I used to know but had forgotten.

        (Spike Lee, Mister Rogers. These are my two usual go-tos. I had a running joke with my friends for a long time that Spike and I were buddy-buddy, because he filmed a bit of “Get On The Bus” at the hospital where I used to volunteer, on a day that I was volunteering, and I walked past him and sort of vaguely attempted to nod at him but he didn’t notice. He is extremely short, shorter than me.)

    • Captain Button

       /  March 20, 2012

      This puts you on the cusp between Pisces and [#sign_after_pisces] doesn’t it?

      Unlike those of us who can decisively commit to bipiscinity.

      Splitter!

      • caoil

         /  March 20, 2012

        Aries. And if Craig wants to hang with us, then he’s welcome to the party.

        /said the Aries.

        • Pisces rule, Aries drool or something.

          • caoil

             /  March 20, 2012

            Alright, fish-man, it’s on.

          • helensprogeny

             /  March 20, 2012

            Pisces? Aries? TOTAL FUCKING LIGHTWEIGHTS!!!

            /scorpio rules.

            • JHarper2

               /  March 20, 2012

              Which should go without saying, but we sometimes have to explain things to the slower signs.

              • helensprogeny

                 /  March 20, 2012

                You have no idea how chuffed I am to share a scorpionic connection with you! Are you October or November? (October here.)

                Also, hoping that your presence on this thread means you’re feeling better.

                • JHarper2

                   /  March 20, 2012

                  October, like all right thinking Scorpios.
                  Actually, my mother and I share a birthday.
                  Improving all the time, after surgery two weeks ago.

              • The Virgos among us protest! We protest, I tell you!

                • wearyvoter

                   /  March 20, 2012

                  Earth sign solidarity. (Taurus, right here.) I’m married to a Sagittarius and mom of a Scorpio.

    • Bookwoman

       /  March 20, 2012

      Many happy returns of the day! You may be an old crank, but we think you’re pretty remarkable.

    • koolaide

       /  March 20, 2012

      A happy day to you. But I think I’m on safe ground suggesting that many folks have remarked upon you…

    • corkingiron

       /  March 20, 2012

      That is a remarkable comment, and I mean that in a completely unremarkable sort of way.

      You should wish for Billy Joel to enter a monastery. Just sayin…..

    • Birthdays are kind of like those other things that everyone has one of, but maybe we shouldn’t talk about, in public, in so much detail? But not really?

      I hope both of those things that are yours are in good repair and pleasant and I will leave it at that.

    • Ian

       /  March 20, 2012

      Happy birthday, Craig. I made you this green, triple-decker mayonnaise cake with tofu cream cheese frosting.

  8. helensprogeny

     /  March 20, 2012

    Two ugly (unrelated) items:
    1) An Idaho lawmaker is apparently afraid women will lie about being raped in order to obtain an abortion. This is not a person who knows any real, actual, live female persons. (Story at huffpuff – I really do need to learn how to link!)

    2) Yahoo is reporting a 7.9 magnitude earthquake near Mexico City. I do not even want to imagine.

  9. Via a post at Volokh.com on the racial obligations of mixed race people (http://volokh.com/2012/03/20/racial-obligations-of-mixed-race-people/)I found this interesting Randall Kennedy piece in the Atlantic of 1997 (http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/97may/kennedy.htm).. The issue is whether someone with a given background should feel and act on a “racial kinship”. Both Ilya Somin (no surprise) and Kennedy (surprise) disagree.

  10. koolaide

     /  March 20, 2012

    Venturing over here from TNC’s place for the first time. I’ve bcm an addict to you people😉

    A) On anibundel’s rec from yesterday, I checked out the 4 episodes of FaceOff on the SyFy site last night. Really enjoyable. Gotta look for more episodes.

    B) I’m researching new (well, used) cars. Anyone want to rep their vehicle? Gotta have 4 doors, good gas mileage, and not break the bank. Didn’t like the Yaris. Need to test drive a Fit and an Elantra. My neighbor is talking up her outback but that might be too big for me.

    • A used Prius?

      • Dex

         /  March 20, 2012

        Just as a cautionary note, we found that used Priuses were almost the same price as the brand new ones. They hold their value incredibly well, but the warranty is often almost gone on them by the time they’re back up on resale. (Note: this is here in Chicago; I’ve got no idea if this is universally true.)

        • Captain Button

           /  March 20, 2012

          Brad DeLong said in one of his lectures that when his Prius was wrecked he got $3000 more from the insurance that he would have in the midwest. In Berkeley it seems a Prius had an extra $3000 value premium for yuppie eco-coolness.

        • koolaide

           /  March 20, 2012

          Prius are thick on the ground where I am. And I’ve been tempted by them. The used Prius market is similar (relative high cost) unless the Prius in question has over 100k miles. Also, perhaps irrationally, I’m hesitant to get a used Prius b/c of concerns about the expense of having to replace the battery w/o warranty. I tend to drive my cars as long as possible so battery replacement would be a distinct possibility.

        • We got our Prius used – the exact price and original price are escaping my sleepless brain but it seemed like a reasonable deal. And of course, the price goes down more the older it is.

      • Used Prius. Love mine to death.

    • Nice to have you!

    • Dex

       /  March 20, 2012

      This may not be up your alley, but we’re most likely going to buy an Elantra Touring in the coming months. It’s crap for styling, but we test-drove it and it was pretty fantastic from a handling standpoint. I would expect the same of the regular Elantra, but it has the bonus of not looking like an appliance box and far better mileage. The other thing we like is the superior warranty.

      We also considered the Prius and Prius V. We’re biased toward hatches and need a bit more room than a fit has to offer due impending kidlings. This is totally irrational, but we own an old Focus hatch and have had nothing but problems with it (seriously, we’re talking MANY repairs that were large and completely unrelated). I think the new Focus looks great, but we just can’t bring ourselves to double dip, even though it’s a completely redesigned vehicle.

      fyi, Mazda finally upgraded the mileage on some of their entry-level cars to get them out of the mid- to high-20s and up in the ballpark of 40mpg. I started my research before that happened (yes, I actually have a spreadsheet with cargo room, price, mileage, warranty, etc.) and had completely eliminated them for that reason.

      • koolaide

         /  March 20, 2012

        Yeah, the consumer reports reliability reports on the Focus enabled me to eliminate them from contention.

        I’m so use to getting ~30 miles per gallon w/ my 1993 vehicle that to go below on gas mileage on a new to me car just hurts. So I’ve kinda eliminated Mazda3s. I’m focusing on used cars b/c I don’t want a huge car payment. But there are a couple of cars that are inexpensive enough (but of quality) that the new price is only a thousand or two more than the price for a 3-4 yr old one w/o breaking my bank account. I’ll look to see if the Mazdas fit that description. Civics, Corollas, and Fits do seem to hold their value a long time where I am.

    • helensprogeny

       /  March 20, 2012

      Horde addiction. You see its victims all about you. There is no cure.

      • koolaide

         /  March 20, 2012

        An addiction this good can’t possibly be bad for me😉

        • caoil

           /  March 20, 2012

          And of course resistance, as you know, is futile.

    • They’re ancient by now, but I’ve had nothing but good luck with my VW GTI. The Mk 4 TDIs got extremely good mileage, especially if you’re willing to live with a slightly gutless motor. However, I’ve heard even better things about the newer Mk 6 Golf TDIs or the Mk 5/6 Jetta Sportwagon TDIs.

      • koolaide

         /  March 20, 2012

        I hear the repair costs for Jettas & Golf’s are high. Also, many I’ve seen are manuals. I’m a loser who can’t drive a manual.

        • My experience may have been abnormal, but in five and a half years of ownership, I’ve spent under $1500 in repairs. And it’d only be a couple of hundred dollars if you don’t count the 80K scheduled stuff or the catalyst going out. Admittedly I also only drive ~5000 miles a year, so it’s not getting a whole lot of abuse either. But the big thing you want with VWs is to see the maintenance records. They seem to either work flawlessly or fall to pieces. If you can find one where the previous owner kept all the receipts and records and it was pretty clean, it’ll probably stay that way.

          Automatics are definitely available on Jettas and Golfs.

    • Mazda 3. My 2007 is fully loaded but gets 28mph, never had a mechanical issue in 4 years, and when some dumbass t-boned me, the only damage was to the doors.

      Oh, and my second choice when I was shopping was the Elantra.

    • R_Bargis

       /  March 20, 2012

      WAKnight got a 2008 Toyota Matrix from CarMax and we’re really happy with it. Decent mileage, decent price, and we can fit a week of camping gear or skis or three friends and overnight bags into it (we may not be parents but we had to buy a car that would transport a lot of people and their crap).

      • I send the Toyota Matrix. I have an 09. The people at the container store yesterday did not think I could fit the four cases of file bins in my car.

        They were wrong.

        • **second, not send. bloody typing skills.

        • Hatchbacks are miraculous. I’ve seen a picture of a VW Golf with five full-sized kegs in it. Or my GTI, which managed to fit an entire bed frame, dining table and chair set, plus assorted other knickknacks from Ikea, all in one go. Sure, the bed frame was sticking out of the sunroof a bit, but whatever. I was cackling madly on the Ikea dock when I managed to get everything to fit.

          • caoil

             /  March 20, 2012

            I cannot help it. I am picturing you cackling madly at Ikea and it’s making me laugh.

          • SWNC

             /  March 20, 2012

            I don’t know why there aren’t more hatchbacks on the market. They are the best.

            • Americans haven’t been terribly fond of hatchbacks and wagons for generations. They’re starting to pick up some more momentum, but for whatever reason we are a country of sedans.

    • We just bought an almost-new 2011 Civic, and it’s a fantastic car so far. We’ve had it about three months. Any of the Civics in the 2009-2011 range are pretty solid. (The 2012s are apparently not so good.)

      We were also looking at the Elantra, and we test drove a couple and really liked them, it was a solid runner-up. (After a 2001 Protege that gave us a lot of trouble in the last 4 years of its life with us, we were done with Mazda for a while. That’s the car the Civic replaced.)

    • I am totally recapping FaceOff next year.

    • SWNC

       /  March 20, 2012

      I have a 2007 Pontiac Vibe and I looooove it. It’s the exact same body and engine as the Toyota Matrix, but because it’s a Pontiac, it was several thousand cheaper. (Go figure.) Like R_Bargis said, it gets good gas mileage and it’s got a lot of trunk space without being a hulking monster of a car.

      • koolaide

         /  March 20, 2012

        That’s the way I went with my last car purchse — my geo prism had a corolla engine but was very much cheaper in 2002 b/c people didn’t realize it. How big is your Vibe? I’ve seen one driving around my neighborhood — it looks taller than the outback but I’ve never managed to look at one standing still.

        • SWNC

           /  March 20, 2012

          It’s a nice medium-sized car, very maneuverable. I’m 5’1, and I really don’t like driving big cars. It’s definitely not too big for me. According to Wikipedia, the measurements are:

          Length 171.3 in (4,351 mm)
          Width 69.9 in (1,775 mm)
          Height 60.6 in (1,539 mm)

          • koolaide

             /  March 20, 2012

            I love that you gave the measurements in english and metric. The metric is completely useless to me as my brain does not compute them. but still. love it.

        • David L

           /  March 20, 2012

          The story my parents told about their ’93 Prism (still in service) and their ’88 Nova (which made it to at least 2002, when we traded it for a used Corolla when I needed an automatic due to of left-leg issues) is that the only difference between it and the Corolla at the time was the seating upholstery and name badge.

          • koolaide

             /  March 20, 2012

            I’m sad I’m going to part ways w/ my 1993 prism (bright green, for safety). But a bunch of things are wrong at once and the repair bill ( > $1500) is too much to not look at buying another.

            • David L

               /  March 20, 2012

              I’m not sure that my parents’ is going to be around much longer, either. There have been multiple times recently when my mother has mentioned having to go pick up my father at work because his car won’t start. I think it’s starting to hit the sudden upswing in the “bathtub curve.”

              • koolaide

                 /  March 20, 2012

                googles “bathtub curve”

                huh. learn a new term every day. thx.

            • I have friends with that same color Prism. It’s… kind of a totally astonishing green.

      • The only thing to look at there is a) how long you want to keep it and b) how long GM is contractually obligated to support them. With the brand being defunct, certain items unique to the Pontiac may become harder to find in future.

    • watson42

       /  March 20, 2012

      Several friends of mine have the Honda Fit and they all love it. Two different people have the 2010 Fit, the other a 2011, I think.

    • I drive my feet, like Quasimoto.

  11. Bookwoman

     /  March 20, 2012

    Since WordPress is clearly having problems today, I’m going to try posting this via another email address and hope it works.

    For the medievalist/English geek/book people among us:

    • aaron singer

       /  March 20, 2012

      That’s adorable. Apparently they have a lot of them.

    • I thought it was just me. WordPress/Gravatar somehow figured out that I was no longer me – I am not sure if this account I’ve logged in with is really me now.

  12. This is from the evening:

    http://www.thesadbastardbar.com/2012/03/for-you-who-used-to-be.html

    For You, Who Used to Be

    When you were born,
    there was a bullet waiting
    in a bigot’s gun.
    The first time your mother held you,
    the first time you saw your parents argue,
    the first girl that bothered you
    on the playground
    before you knew what you two were supposed to do
    with each other;
    that bullet was always waiting,
    like a guardian angel,
    to kiss you when you fell
    to covet grace before you and violence most of all.

    Your math teacher scolding you in eighth grade, disappointed,
    telling you homework was to be done at home
    and she knew you knew;
    what would she say different
    if she saw you in your box?
    A box promised for a grown man
    that fits a boy instead.
    When you wrapped your tongue
    around another
    and felt a clean hip under the ends of a t-shirt
    before either of you knew or cared about where
    the right t-shirts were bought and what socks to wear them with.
    Would she have loved you different
    if she knew?
    Would bad beatless music have done
    or would she change it to your favorite song
    on a mixtape you would have listened to
    together
    on a road trip you go to go on
    because your parents knew.

    The bullet always knew it was waiting for you.
    It was waiting to mark your last step.
    No doctor said you could die
    from walking, but you did.
    A seventeen year old boy dead
    by a bullet out a bigot’s barrel
    and the police chief said he knew,
    in his heart,
    the goodness of the truth.
    And he went home
    and fucked his wife.
    Not for the last time.
    He called up his friends and got hammered on cheap beer;
    not for the last time.
    He went to work and got a paycheck he didn’t earn;
    not for the last time.
    And the bigot,
    he gets a camera crew
    because he knew
    you were up to something
    so he followed you.
    And he was scared, but not because he saw it too.
    He had carried that bullet.
    And he will hear human voices again
    and see girls again
    and remember youthful scolding’s again.
    And he will know what it is
    to watch a seventeen year old boy fall,
    robbed of everything
    he had been told and felt
    in earnest absence of the coming fact;
    A boy whose parents never got a chance
    to love him like they knew.

    But it was not the hand
    of Fate
    or God
    or righteous thunder
    that struck you.
    It was an ignorant man who feared you,
    who never thought for a second about
    why
    he was fucking with this kid
    who probably hadn’t even fallen in love yet,
    who never thought for a second of his parents and his cousins
    and every time they would mention his name in absence.

    I’m thousands of miles away.
    We will never have a conversation.
    Nothing I wish for you will happen.
    This bigot will walk each step in earnest fear.
    Those cops will commend themselves
    until they face public shaming
    and so they leave the defiant commendations
    for their family rooms.
    And other boys will die just like you,
    like it was destined,
    like it was not law or ignorance,
    bigots or incompetence,
    but a bullet waiting.
    But it wasn’t.
    They were supposed protect you
    and they robbed you
    and you can’t be put back
    where you go.
    You go in a box too heavy for you
    that fits you too early
    and the police chief,
    in his heart,
    says it was waiting for you.

  13. Dex

     /  March 20, 2012

    Not sure how much interest there will be in this, but:

    Got any stories or thoughts on selecting godparents and/or guardians of your kids? This just in: kids are not like CD collections or retirement funds.

    • watson42

       /  March 20, 2012

      My siblings did this rather pragmatically for their kids. They selected those of their siblings who are in stable relationships/married and have stable living situations.

      • Dex

         /  March 20, 2012

        Watson! So glad you responded. So sorry that I didn’t respond to your post the other day regarding the Damascus steel of total awesomeness. I read it at the time, but I was on a tight deadline for a paper and running models on a piece of software that basically makes it impossible for me to respond while working (I can read in Chrome, but can only respond on IE, and it doesn’t play well with my stats program😦 ).

        I was totally salivating at the idea of working with stuff like that. I’m torn; I love woodworking and know that I really need to throw myself into it in order to get better, but part of me would love to get sidetracked with metalworking so that I can make hardware for my work.

        • watson42

           /  March 20, 2012

          I totally hear you re tight deadlines. I am one of those people who gets completely sucked into data analysis and a bomb could go off near me or I’ll miss three meals and not even notice.

          Did you like the first aid tape on my finger in the previous pic? Amazing how fast a 36-grit belt on a grinder can remove flesh.

          Here are two more images for your enjoyment:
          http://imgur.com/GN36g

          The first one is the previous billet forged out, cut in half, each half twisted in different directions, then forged together.
          That billet became one of the components of the second image, which gets one more operation later today (I hope) to get the final. I have a very specific pattern in mind for the final, so we’ll see if it turns out.

          I love metal work. But the problem is having a place to do it. it’s not like most towns allow you to set up a blacksmithing forge in your garage. One benefit of unemployment is that I finally can focus on *understanding* the medium (steel) better, if that makes sense. But venue is tough. Even doing cold work in my 1 bedrm apt gets problematic.

          • Ian

             /  March 20, 2012

            Don’t really understand what I’m looking at, but I love those pictures.

            I just spent a stupidly long time trying to decide whether to make a 15-degree miter block or a miter box for cutting the scarf joints for ukulele necks. Night before last I said to to hell with it and just started sawing them to a line. Works fine. Just a little planing to make them right. But this is kind of my quandary. On the one hand, I know that building jugs and work board and molds will make the work faster and probably better down the line. On the other, I’m feeling impatient and want to see some progress.

            In related news, air-dried myrtle is fantastically easy to work with.

            • Ian

               /  March 20, 2012

              That would be jigs, not jugs. And work boards.

            • watson42

               /  March 20, 2012

              Sorry for not replying earlier – went to the shop. Anyway, what you’re looking at is the cross section of a billet of Damascus steel, more properly pattern-welded steel. I started with 15 layers of two different kinds of steel, then forge welded them together and started folding ,twisting, etc. Think antique Japanese blades.

              You make musical instruments? Very cool. I’m jealous. And I’m not that great with wood, though I love it as a medium.

              I know what you mean about being impatient and wanting to see some progress. i’ve learned patience the hard way when it comes to metal. There’s nothing like spending 4 months on making some Damasuc, turning into something then having the final product delaminate or something because I was too impatient somewhere in the first four weeks of the process.

              • Scientific research, encapsulated.

                • watson42

                   /  March 21, 2012

                  Patience in science is a whole other order of magnitude. 🙂 A friend of mine once described research as “beating your head against a brick wall for six months to get one usable piece of data.”

                  • At my alma mater, there was a sort of yearbook where all of the seniors would submit a personal photo and a joke title for their thesis. Mine was “How I Spent a Year Trying to Get Two Numbers to Prove a Couple of Guys Wrong.”

              • Ian

                 /  March 21, 2012

                I’ve made two instruments, a steel string guitar and a tenor uke, but I made both in somebody else’s shop and used a lot of power tools. Right now I’m starting to build in my own shop using hand tools as much as possible (hopefully entirely, though I might give in and use a router and/or drill press). Started out by shooting and gluing up a bunch of bookmatched plates for tops and backs, and now I’m planing them to thickness and starting to make some necks. I love it, but I’m years from being good at it.

                If you know anything about Japanese toolmaking (especially chisels), I’d love to ask you about it some time.

          • Dex

             /  March 20, 2012

            I will not lie: saw the tape and my first guess was that it was a grinder.

    • Bookwoman

       /  March 20, 2012

      Here’s how we did guardians, through the years. At first it was grandparents, but when they began to get too old we switched to my brother and sister-in-law, who live in another state. When our daughter turned 18 but our son was only 14, we chose a couple who are close friends and the parents of one of our son’s best friends. At that point we wouldn’t have wanted him to be uprooted on top of everything else, this couple and their house were like a second home to our son, and they readily agreed. We have very little in the way of immediate family, and thankfully we had these friends to turn to. (Now it’s all moot because in a month he’ll turn 20. How did that happen?)

      • watson42

         /  March 20, 2012

        To follow up with this, this is how some friends of mine did it. I was the godparent for a pair of my friends since I lived close to them, they knew I love their kid (and she loves me), and they’d met my baby sister who I raised for a while and they figured I did a good job. 🙂 When I moved 3000 miles away, guardianship was transferred to someone more local.

      • Dex

         /  March 20, 2012

        Yeah, I think parents would have been my first choice, too, if both sets weren’t so much older. We’re lucky in that we have a great support system, but I just sort of stepped on a land mine the other night regarding this issue. I’m sure it will all work out in the end, as we still have ample time to decide before we really need to make a decision. Thanks for your thoughts.

    • SWNC

       /  March 20, 2012

      We basically did what watson42’s siblings did. Both sets of parents are older and we didn’t feel like it would be a good idea to saddle them with young’uns in the unlikely event of our firey demise. While both of our brothers are awesome uncles, neither uncle wants kids of his own. Mr. SWNC’s sister, on the other hand, is in a very stable marriage and has two kids of her own. Their child-rearing style doesn’t exactly match ours, but they’re good, loving parents and I would have no qualms at all about letting any child be raised by them. We’re the guardians for their kids as well, and I suspect they feel much the same way about us. And we all live in the same town, so all the kids know each other and the grown-ups very well, plus if, God forbid, something were to happen, the kids wouldn’t have to leave their home town on top of everything else.

      • Dex

         /  March 20, 2012

        Thanks for this. Yeah, realistically, the kid(s) would have to move far away, regardless of the situation, at a minimum cross-country and in all likelihood internationally. This year has basically been the first time that I have ever felt any sort of second thoughts about living so far away from home.

        We started talking about this and it got a bit contentious, which is super-unusual for us. Not to put too fine of a point on it, but my wife’s first and initially only choice would be, for me, the very last choice on my list, and wouldn’t be able to the second last choice on the list due to the curvature of the earth.

        I think the problem was that we started talking about it with a completely off-hand comment and with neither of us having put much thought at all into the decision. I feel like this idea of going through the pros and cons (e.g., geography, resources, stability, parenting style, etc.) of the decision would be a good way to approach it.

        • SWNC

           /  March 20, 2012

          Ooooh, that’s tricky. I think a calm listing of priorities and pros and cons is a very good idea. Fortunately, you’ve got some time to come to a decision. And, as others have pointed out, guardianship can change over time as your child’s needs change.

          This year has basically been the first time that I have ever felt any sort of second thoughts about living so far away from home.
          Having grandparents, aunts and uncles, and cousins close by is a huge factor–the hugest, really–in us being where we are. There are drawbacks, but I can’t imagine gutting it out without the support of extended family. (Caveat: our families, while annoying at times, are essentially sane and loving.) I have a lot of respect for those who do.

        • chingona

           /  March 20, 2012

          This can be really tough because it can crystallize and intensify all the issues that you have with each other’s families. Things that are easy (or hell, maybe hard) to compromise about when it’s where you’re spending the holidays become extremely painful when it’s your kids and their future in light of a major trauma that no one really wants to think about. I have a friend who basically cannot have this conversation with her husband because of all the shit it would stir up. I once gave her the breakdown on my own agonizing over it, and she just laughed and said that she and her husband just better not both die because having to come to a decision and put it in writing would end with their divorce.

          • Dex

             /  March 20, 2012

            I think that I am blessed in that regard, in that I would be fine with any other person in our support network that my wife agrees with. I think problem is that I viscerally reacted and essentially said that I would never agree to the first suggested choice. I softened it somewhat: saying that I would change my mind, but nothing in the past 11 years has given me indication that change would be forthcoming. I feel horrible, because my reaction, while not angry, was visceral, absolute, and escaped my lips before I had any idea that I was thinking or saying anything. It was actually kind of shocking to me at the time. Babies make people do crazy sh!t.

            [This is a very long story and I don’t want to paint a negative picture of my wife here. Suffice it to say that the very qualities that I love most in her– loyalty, loving, caring– are the very things that pushed her to this initial first reaction. I don’t want it to be taken in any way that my wife is advocating the kid(s) be placed with someone who would put them in danger or would not be able to provide for them.]

            • chingona

               /  March 20, 2012

              No worries. I didn’t take it that way. Just thinking of how the issue has played out for us and other people in our lives, even without knowing the details, I can easily imagine many scenarios in which spouses would have very different perspectives on this, all strongly felt, without anyone placing a child in danger.

              Yes, babies make people do crazy shit.

    • chingona

       /  March 20, 2012

      We struggled with this. We live in the same city as my husband’s family, so our children know them better than they know my family in the the day-to-day sort of way, and it would be less disruption to them to stay here. However, his parents are conservative evangelical Christrians. My husband loves his parents and thinks they were good parents, but feels specifically that being raised in their religion really messed him up. Also, I want my kids raised Jewish, and not only are my in-laws Christian but their church has a close connection with a messianic Jewish (Jews for Jesus) congregation.

      No siblings are in a stable enough situation.

      So I think it’s got to be my parents, who live on the other side of the country. I wonder sometimes if I’m prioritizing the wrong things, though I suppose it would be a lot worse if my husband really wanted it to be his parents and I disagreed.

      • Dex

         /  March 20, 2012

        Thanks for this. The thing that I like most about it is that idea of breaking it down into different priorities and trying to talk about it a more objective and analytical fashion. We’re both hardcore nerds, to that suits both of us.

    • Suggestion, from watching my parents: make sure you stay on top of that shit. There were various points in time when, if my parents had died, I could have wound up getting raised by people who were no longer partnered and neither of whom my parents had spoken to in years.

      • Dex

         /  March 20, 2012

        Yeah, this is a good point. I mean, the idea of a prerequisite of being paired off/married up is not really on the radar for us, but the person or persons being able to raise a child certainly is, as is the idea that we need to update things as life moves forward.

        At one time or another, I’ve been designated as executor of maybe five different people’s wills. I’m still close to them, obviously that’s a far cry from being named as their kids’ guardian, but it would be really weird if I had to suddenly be mediator and executor of an estate for people with whom I no longer had a relationship.

      • David L

         /  March 20, 2012

        I think this was part of why my parents insisted on a close relative–the bond was unlikely to fade. However, that basically meant that it was a case of falling by default to my aunt rather than much of a choice (my father’s side of the family was out because of living in a foreign country, my mother’s parents were too old, and, at the time the decision was made, neither of her brothers was in a good place to potentially have to deal with two mourning children.)

    • corkingiron

       /  March 20, 2012

      If I may be so bold – it can often be rendered moot by life changes etc. Our decision was to choose a couple of people whose judgement we trusted – and asked them to make the decision should we be rendered incapable.

      • Dex

         /  March 20, 2012

        This is an interesting take. Definitely something to chew on.

  14. watson42

     /  March 20, 2012

    Was anyone else distracted by the shot of the waterfall in the Prometheus trailer? it looks like NIagara Falls, but I can’t tell if it’s supposed to be the Falls, or a waterfall on another planet. The downriver approach is somewhat different, and the background somewhat different (at least from the angle I’m used to seeing it), but I swear the waterfall you see is Niagara. I may have to see the movie just to satisfy my curiosity.

    I couldn’t tell you what specifically makes me think it’s Niagara, except that portion of the fall is so bloody familiar – the shape of the edge, the places where the water bounces out, etc. Anyway, it completely distracted me when I watched the trailer.

    • aaron singer

       /  March 20, 2012

      I was not distracted, but looking back after you mention it, it may well be Niagara Falls. If you watch the international trailer, they make a brief mention of many ancient cultures being “contacted” by Ancient Aliens; perhaps whomever was in the area (ancestors of the Iroquois, would be my uninformed guess) of Niagara at the time was one of them.

  15. I love my Elantra…granted it is a 2002, but I bought it new and it is still in GREAT shape. Also, a big plus is that it’s cheap to fix. I still get 28mpg and it is pretty peppy.

  16. Neocortex

     /  March 20, 2012

    If you’re pro-choice, and especially if you live in Massachusetts, and have any money to spare, please please donate to the Eastern Massachusetts Abortion Fund through my page. You can opt to not have your name show up. We provide grants, referrals, and financial counseling to people who are pregnant, want abortions, and can’t afford them. We’re getting around 40 calls a week right now, and we really need the money. We’re all volunteers and we don’t rent office space, so very little donor money goes to overhead.

  17. watson42

     /  March 20, 2012

    Speaking of kids, my sister really freaked me out yesterday moring. As I think I’ve mentioned before, she’s pregnant but has a medical condition which makes it by no means certain she will carry to term or that she will make it through delivery. She called yesterday at 8 AM, didn’t leave a message. I get out of the shower, see she called but no message and assume the worst. Thankfully it was just her going stir crazy from enforced bed rest. I told her next time at least leave a status update…

    • SWNC

       /  March 20, 2012

      That has got to be so hard for your family. I will keep her in my thoughts.

      • watson42

         /  March 20, 2012

        Thanks for the good thoughts. We are all studiously being optimistic to each other, though I know we’re all freaking out in private. Thankfuily I have the Horde. 🙂

    • Dex

       /  March 20, 2012

      I feel you. I was out of town the past couple of days and my wife didn’t answer my goodnight texts both nights. Basically, she was passed out cold sleeping, of which she has been doing a lot, thanks to the pregnancy. At a certain point, I start panicking about not hearing from her and start dreaming up these ridiculous scenarios and then I’d have to talk myself down from it. And my wife doesn’t even have health problems complicating things!

      I’m totally not like that about other stuff. It’s so weird how pregnancy changes things, even when you’re not the one who is pregnant.

      • watson42

         /  March 20, 2012

        It is funny how pregnancy can change things. And it’s funny how one leaps to the worst-case scenario. Human nature, I guess. We always stress when the stake are high…and things aren’t in our control. I rationalize it in that I’m one of the very few that my sister calls when things go wrong. Plus she’s my baby sister.

  18. koolaide

     /  March 20, 2012

    I just today saw that youtube mash up “will the the real mitt romney please stand up” and it is HILARIOUS. I’m usually so behind on things that I assume all you cool cats already know this fact. But here’s a link in case you want to watch:

  19. I have been too busy to post – but I want to say I MADE IT TO THE TOP 250:
    http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/abna/quarterfinalists/ABNA_YoungAdultFiction_Quarterfinalists_2012._V135651200_.pdf

    I’m in the quarter finals – one of the top 250 novels of the year!

    Woot

    • Dex

       /  March 20, 2012

      WOW. Awesome job, man. I’ve got my fingers crossed for you.

    • Also, and not for nothing, but:

      How the hell was Luxembourg?!

      • Awesome.

        This time was much better. I was more relaxed, ventured much farther from my hotel (3-4 km of walking each way), went to the older mizzen-y parts of the city, experienced what it’s like to be in a European city among the hordes of Africans and ME residents, heard French spoken in very interesting ways, listened to all kinds of music & ate all kinds of food, felt comfortable shopping for things and paying for things without a single word of recognizable communication between me & the shopkeepers (but wishing I had spent some time in high school/college learning French as well as German).

        I have to tell you, one of the most interesting things is that because my heritage is (on one side) Germanic I was very, very comfortable with the Germanic Luxembourg, to the point where it was invisible to me.

        But the French side of Luxembourg, along with the Francophones from Africa – it is hard to explain how profoundly that affected me. Very, very cultured & well dressed people, way above me in class (in more than one meaning of that term), communicating in an incomprehensible language. I longed to be able to understand and grasp what that was like.

        It was incredibly charming to hear & see the school kids speaking their slangy French as they raced around me. Kids are kids no matter the age, and yet you can tell they are being quite impolite to you, knowing you are unable to understand them.

        I know there’d been some discussion of West African and French rap music on TNC’s blog, but – there it was, live in bars from microphones. That was worth the trip right there – to hear that music & feel the beat and yet not really understand the words.

        I wish I had someone with me, though. Since it was business, it was just me – everyone I work with flees the city at 5:00 to travel back to France or Belgium or Germany.

        • So glad for you! So jealous, also! Next time, pack me in your suitcase and we’ll go out for dinner and street prowling when everyone else goes home.

    • wearyvoter

       /  March 20, 2012

      Yay!

  20. meant to add

    WOOT!

  21. carlosthedwarf

     /  March 20, 2012

    Had a job interview today. They really liked me, but they seemed to think I was over-qualified for the position. Also, it’s a 35-minute-each-way commute from my current home, which is an additional 45-minutes-each-way from anyplace I’d really like to be living. The pay would be pretty decent and it would be a standard 9-5, so I think I could deal with the hour-plus commute. But the fact that they think I’m overqualified worries me, especially given that I’m barely above entry-level employment.

    • Hmm. What kind of job? Do they pay well? Could you do it w/o getting bored?

      • carlosthedwarf

         /  March 20, 2012

        It’s an entry-level marketing position. I have some experience in the field, but I’ve been turned down from many, many places for not having the requisite experience for an entry-level position. (I’m less than three years out of college, and I spent a year unemployed.) The pay is decent–I certainly know many people who live on less, but I wouldn’t be saving a ton either. As for whether I could do it without getting bored–I’d probably be bored sometimes, but I don’t know of any job I could get right now where that wouldn’t be the case. Boredom is the price you pay for gaining the experience that enables you to get less boring jobs.

        • That is fascinating that they think you overqualified – a good marketing agent is priceless. I wish I had more access to one; I already overburden her and she has a million things on her plate. And if someone came along who was “overqualified” I’d find work that would make that person qualified.

          I wish you well.

        • Dex

           /  March 20, 2012

          There is the possibility that you can channel that boredom into doing bigger things for the company, even if you’re leaving. I actually just had an hour-long conversation with one of my best friends who’s in marketing and we talked about this very thing. He gets bored a lot and he built a pretty amazing career that way. I think he’s arrived at every job he’s ever had with a plan for the next job he’ll move to once he achieves a certain goal. In his spare time, he’d just dream up and implement crazy marketing projects shoestring so that his employers couldn’t really object. Nowadays, he’s getting headhunted from big-time companies all over the world.

    • The fear is you’ll get bored and leave.

      They feared that with me at my current job. They were half right. I would be bored. Thankfully, I find things to do.

      • carlosthedwarf

         /  March 20, 2012

        I will be leaving, regardless of how good the job is. This isn’t what I want to be doing for my whole life, but it’s really important to me to have a job that allows me to be independent and live in my own place for a while before I go to graduate school. But they don’t have to know that now.

  22. Nearly had a meltdown at Whole Paycheck. Did have a meltdown at Walgreens.

    People. I need to get far, far away from them after work is over.

    *huddles behind cats*

    • {timid internet hug since I am unfortunately a people}

    • Captain_Button

       /  March 20, 2012

      Cats are good.

    • wearyvoter

       /  March 20, 2012

      I am firmly in your corner on this. (Or away from your corner to leave you space for the kitties to gather.) I work for a place where 99 percent of my exposure to the world is through email. But once a year I am out among the people with whom I work over email. It’s only for a few days, but they are long days, and one has to be on all of the time. It’s good to put faces with names, but I am happiest when ensconced in my little cube farm.

  23. Darth Thulhu

     /  March 20, 2012

    May you have the merriest of unremarked-upon equinoxes, with an equal measure of punch and pie.

  24. Bookwoman

     /  March 20, 2012

    I’ve found what the WordPress commenting issue is about (or at least for the difficulties I was having):

    “if a user comments with an email address that’s tied to a WordPress.com (or Gravatar) account, they’ll need to log in before they can comment with that address.”

    Which is annoying, because I do have a WordPress account for a website I administer, but my user name for that isn’t the one I’m known by here. Feh.

    • wearyvoter

       /  March 20, 2012

      You can change the display name. (I found that out by accident the other day.) I have the same complication.