The Khan appears to be out on the steppe – Open Thread.

Have at it, members of Ta-Nehisi’s Golden Horde, and whomsoever might be interested in chiming in. This thread? Open!

108 Comments

  1. wearyvoter

     /  October 21, 2011

    Happy Friday!

  2. wearyvoter

     /  October 21, 2011

    What’s the news on JHarper2?

    • You got to it before I could! Here’s what his sister wrote to me:

      I have just spoken to my mom who has conveyed the following:
      [JHarper2]’s surgery today went according to plan: meaning there were no surprises, or unforseen complications during the actual surgery.
      They were able to perform the surgery laproscopically (spelling?), which generally is far better when it comes to size of incision.
      He is back on the ward–groggy and sore, albeit to be expected.
      They also removed the abdominal catheter–as they had told him they would.
      It will be one week-ten days till pathology is back from the lab regarding the mass.
      This waiting game will be the next tough thing to come through.

      Thank you so much (on his behalf)–I know how very much he appreciates your love, support and care.

      If there are further updates in next few days, I will send them along.

      with gratitude and friendship,
      [JHarper2’s sister]

      • corkingiron

         /  October 21, 2011

        Thanks for this. I was wondering how he was doing. Holding a good thought.

      • wearyvoter

         /  October 21, 2011

        Thanks!

      • That;s good.

      • taylor16

         /  October 21, 2011

        Oh, thanks for the update. Keeping him in my thoughts.

        Also, this situation just inspired me to tell my husband that if anything ever happens to me, he has to come over to TNC’s and tell y’all. Follow suit, please, the rest of you. Otherwise, we will worry!

        • taylor16

           /  October 21, 2011

          Um, I just realized that I totally took this and made it all about me, which wasn’t my intent. I’m just glad we have such a tight community that we care about each other and check on one another. I feel lucky to be a part of it.

          /me me me🙂

          • Oh girl. You are totally fine! You are not being about you you you – you’re being about how this crazy new Internet Community thing works, and that is a good, good thing.

            I was so worried about JH2 when I read that one recent comment, and had already been worried about him because he’s mostly not been around, and I just realized – if I don’t grab the bull by the horns, none of us will ever know if something goes wrong! Back when I stopped commenting at Jezebel, I was involved for awhile with a sub-community called The Basement, and they had just this conversation: How do we make sure we all know if something worrying happens? I don’t know that I have a fits-all solution, but yes, certainly, I think that if we ask our loved ones to get the news to TNC (either by email or in an Open Thread) or to whoever we know in the Horde well enough to be in email contact with — I think that would be a good thing.

            We really are a community, and communities worry about and take care of each other, as best they can.

      • Ian

         /  October 21, 2011

        Thanks.

      • caoil

         /  October 21, 2011

        Like like like for the update. Glad to hear things went well.

      • socioprof

         /  October 21, 2011

        Thanks for this update.

      • SWNC

         /  October 21, 2011

        Thank you for the update.

  3. intangir

     /  October 21, 2011

    Well TNC did just tweet about a NY cabbie listening to Limbaugh – I guess he’s too stunned to post anything else.

    So I’m heading to the Orlando and Tampa Bay area next week – does anyone have any activity suggestions? We’ll definitely be doing Cape Canaveral, Universal Studios, and at least one of the Disney parks, but which one or ones remains to be seen. No kids, just my wife and I. Probably won’t want to do anything else expensive after the parks but who knows.

    • taylor16

       /  October 21, 2011

      My husband and I were in Orlando a few years back, and we enjoyed Epcot the most of all the Disney parks. The science-y and history-y focus appeals to us more than characters and rides, so that’s where we spent the most time.

      Also, while the World side of the lake is a little … cloying? Stereotyped? Pick your adjective … we still found it to be a nice place to grab an adult beverage and a bite to eat that wasn’t chicken tenders, and to peoplewatch or see the fireworks.

      Have fun!

      • efgoldman

         /  October 21, 2011

        Years ago, when I was in radio, both Disney and Universal would give media members (even those with six or eight listeners, like me) free day passes, covering admission and rides – and nothing else.
        So, over several days we went to both.
        When we were done, I felt that Disney had ripped us off, but really enjoyed Universal.

  4. efgoldman

     /  October 21, 2011

    Is the Khan wrathful?

    I have taken a sideways interest in the many comment threads, among the Horde, discussing the virtues and vices of various reading devices, phone-like devices or Etch-a-Sketch™ like web and computing devices. At least most of you are into the 21st century. I, alas, refuse to be dragged there. I have a cell phone – it makes phone calls. I read books. I watch TV on a TV set, when the shows are broadcast.
    I have no grandchildren yet. I hope that is remedied before too, too much longer. What follows is an imagined future conversation between me and a prospective grandchild.

    Me: Shall we read a story?
    GC: Oh yes, Grandpa, I love stories.
    Me: How about Make Way for Ducklings? That’s always been one of my favorites.
    GC: Is that a new story? I don’t know that one.
    Me: It’s a very old story. My Mom and Dad read it to me when I was a kid, and Grandma and I read it to your mom when she was little.
    GC: Well then lets read that one.
    Me: I’ll go get it, while you make yourself comfortable in my big chair. :::walks over to bookshelf and gets book::::
    GC: :::as I approach the chair::: What’s that, Grandpa?
    Me: :::tries not to weep::: It’s called a “book” sweetheart.
    GC: But how do you read it? It doesn’t have a screen. How do you choose the story? It doesn’t have any index. How do you go to the next screen without any buttons?
    Me: :::Sighs::: This is how we used to read stories, until just a few years ago.
    GC: It looks hard.
    Me: It really isn’t. May I show you?
    GC: :::snuggles into Grandpa’s chest::: Sure.
    Me: Once upon a time, Mr. and Mrs. Mallard were looking for a place to live.
    ==
    OK all you damned kids, off my lawn. You can’t charge your batteries here!
    [I was an original Make Way… reader. It came out just a few years before I was born. We lived on the back side of beacon Hill, which is now very expensive, but at the time was considered tenements, extended from the old West End, across Cambridge Street.]

    • I like watching TV on my own schedule, without commercials, but I can’t get into e-books at all. Maybe if I could afford one of those fancy new devices – but then again, a paper book is just worth more to me than an e-book. No one can revoke my right to read it, for one thing.

      • No one can revoke my right to read it, for one thing. How ’bout it.

      • helensprogeny

         /  October 22, 2011

        I’m a day late to the discussion, but I sooooo identify. I love all the streaming video so I can watch what I want to watch when I want to watch it. And I might learn to love e-books if an e-reader wasn’t a total luxury in my present financial world. But I live literally surrounded by my books. I sleep with them. I’m around them all the time. They’re a visible extension of who I am and where I am mentally, emotionally and spiritually. What would my life be like without bookshelves?

    • on behalf of those who have yet to spawn, but have cats instead, I would gently suggest not pushing for grand-spawn. It’ll come in time.

    • corkingiron

       /  October 21, 2011

      They will enjoy reading with you. And if the book is “Mortimer – Be Quiet!!” by Robert Munsch – you’ll both get a pretty good work-out at the same time.

      • CORKINGIRON.

        I have a question that has nothing to do with this, but for which I require a Canadian.

        When Jack Layton died and I had no idea who he was and then I was furiously wishing that I had known of him before his all-too-early death, I probably read and learned more about Canada than I had in my entire life prior to that date. And I read something about a labor march half way across the country that (I think) somehow involved railroad workers? In the early 20th century? It was called something like “Walk to Ottawa” or “The Ottawa Trek” or something?

        And now I cannot, for the life of me, remember enough salient information to even google it! Help me corkingiron! You’re my only hope!

        • corkingiron

           /  October 21, 2011

          OOOH Captain Canada gets to rescue a damsel in distress!

          I think you want the On-to-Ottawa Trek, circa 1936. It began in labour camps in the BC Interior – camps set up to “employ” the legions of unemployed men – established in isolated areas and run by the Canadian Army. The trek eventually involved thousands of men – but it was stopped in Regina when the RCMP broke it up forcefully (IIRC, two men were killed) – although the leadership did make to Ottawa.

          • corkingiron

             /  October 21, 2011

            Link here:

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On-to-Ottawa_Trek

            My date was wrong – 1935 – but hey, I was goin’ from memory. Not too shabby for the old guy!

          • YES. The On to Ottawa Trek! Isn’t that crazy, I was THIS CLOSE to remembering.

            And wasn’t there something very recent wherein it was recognized on some national level for the first time, or in a new way? This recognition may be directly related to Jack Layton, but I’m really not clear on that, either.

          • caoil

             /  October 21, 2011

            I hope you have a cape.

            • corkingiron

               /  October 22, 2011

              But no tights….that would be soooooo wrong.

    • wearyvoter

       /  October 21, 2011

      First time I heard that story, it was during the featured read-aloud on Captain Kangaroo sometime in the early 1960’s, so no matter who reads it, my mental tape plays back Bob Keeshan’s voice.

      • Damn it, where is the like on this stupid blog?

      • I woke up to Cap’n Kangaroo every morning back in the days when TV didn’t come on until 6:00 a.m. – before that, there was an Indian head pattern, and before that was nothing but snow.

        Yes, I am that old.

        • wearyvoter

           /  October 21, 2011

          And when sign-off was around 1 a.m. if not earlier. That lasted until the 1980’s (latish 1980s in many markets.) Just before sign-on, the stations would run a bar chart, along with a tone so the engineers could calibrate things before they went on the air. And there was a sign-on message. (Also a sign-off.) Sign on and sign off messages had frequency information, power, subcarrier, all that other good stuff. (Used to work in smallish local markets back in the day.

          • wearyvoter

             /  October 21, 2011

            )

          • I seem to remember the National Anthem as well, but I don’t remember if that was what signaled the start of the day or the end of the day. I’m pretty sure that I wouldn’t have stayed up ’till all hours of the night.

            • wearyvoter

               /  October 21, 2011

              National Anthem was over the sign off at a couple of stations where I worked. (My husband worked for the same stations, and if we had one car out of commission, I had to come pick him up if he was on the really late shift, and that was running right about the time I’d get to master control.) America the Beautiful was the one we used for sign-on at one of the stations. Both ran over video montages of Very American Scenery.

              • efgoldman

                 /  October 21, 2011

                National Anthem was optional.
                My station was 24/7- in fact i did the overnights for 15 years.
                Even though we didn’t have to (by regulation), we played the awful Carmen Dragon arrangement of America the Beautiful (apparently he felt it was really a dirge) along with a sign-on announcement every morning at 5:56. It was the last thing I did, every day, before I went hoime.

              • Hmm. I just don’t quite remember – but I’m dang sure it wasn’t America the Beautiful.

                snow – Indian – National Anthem – then the Cap’n Kangaroo theme. Then sometime later my dad would be up. Heh. I think I woke him up every morning with the TV.

    • wearyvoter

       /  October 21, 2011

      Fox in Sox read at high speed is also quite entertaining. (Used to make my kid fall over laughing.)

      • efgoldman

         /  October 21, 2011

        Fox in Sox was also a favorite.
        While its not the important part of the story, Make Way… also brings a series of similar sounding syllables [he said alliteratively] when the ducklings are named:
        Jack, Kack, Lack, Mack, Nack, Oack, Pack and Quack (from memory – ta-daaa).

    • ralphdibny

       /  October 21, 2011

      Isn’t your scenario the opening of The Princess Bride? (BTW, now I imagine you with Peter Falk’s voice). In other words, people have been lamenting the imminent demise of the book for a while now.

      • efgoldman

         /  October 21, 2011

        Didn’t mean it to be, although all things Princess Bride are wonderful.
        (Sort of tangent: The other night, when ABC news was reporting the death of Ghaddafi, the reporter said “we are not sure he is dead at this point [in the video]. I immediately turned to mrs efgoldman and said “well, they need Miracle Max to tell them.”)

        • ralphdibny

           /  October 21, 2011

          Oh no! Are you saying he’s only MOSTLY dead? Because there’s a big difference between mostly dead and all dead!

          • efgoldman

             /  October 21, 2011

            No, I was saying that Miracle Max could tell, and would know the difference.
            [66 years old and I live my whole life in decades of taglines. Gad.]

    • I have long <3'ed ye, but now I❤ you that much more.

      BOOKS FOREVER. (And cute stories, too!)

  5. This is a poor substitute for the real OTAN, but:

    Chicago Horde

    Sunday evening

    7:30

    Big Star http://www.bigstarchicago.com/

    1531 N. Damen (just off the blue line)

    • PS So far I know of four, possibly five attendees. That’s a lovely number, but it would be great to have even more!

    • efgoldman

       /  October 21, 2011

      Madam, you are rarely a poor substitute for anything.
      OK, maybe for New york Superfudge Chunk…

      • ; )

        I meant in terms of bandwith — I presume I would just be an odd substitute for a 6 foot 5 inch man, not necessarily a poor one.

  6. Enjoy your meetup, guys.

    I’ll be in San Jose next week for a conference. Does it get any better than this?

    • Do you know the way to San Jose?

      (sorry)

      • David L

         /  October 21, 2011

        ISTR the noted geographer Bugs Bunny said it involved a left turn at Albuqurque.

        • efgoldman

           /  October 21, 2011

          it involved a left turn at Albuqurque.
          The correct pronunciation of which, in context, is “AL-ba-koik-ee.”

          • David L

             /  October 21, 2011

            I almost rendered Albuquerque phonetically, then worried nobody would be able to figure out what I meant by Albukoique.

            • corkingiron

               /  October 21, 2011

              That remains a standard phrase in our house for “I screwed up” as in “I should’a toined left at Albekoique” instead of “I got the cayenne confused with the paprika. Again”.

      • San Jose is the Paris of Silicon Valley.

        I’m

        Just

        Sayin’

        • efgoldman

           /  October 21, 2011

          Isn’t that kind of like being the best beach resort in the tundra?

  7. Pups! Nieclings! Coffee! Playground! I tell you, this is the best therapy a girl could ask for. *goes back to being order to push the swing by bossy twin*

    • That sounds like the best day on earth. I’m presuming it is as sunny and blue-skied where you are as it is where I am. Yay for pups, nieclings and coffee!

      • i am currently watching both twins being mesmerised by sesame street. It’s fascinating.

        The day is a beautiful crisp fall day, with Simpsonian clouds in the sky.

        • As I knew it must be.

          Yay for days like this! (Even if they did arrive for us AFTER Sukkot, meaning our holiday was a rather soggy and be-draggled affair…!).

  8. Ian

     /  October 21, 2011

    Passed my drug test and got my pipeline badge, so I’m headed up north first thing Monday morning. We have a station to fix just beyond Atigun Pass (68.42, -149.36). It will be my first time crossing the Arctic Circle, first time driving the Haul Road, and first time on a pump station. Not sure why we’re doing it in late October, but it’ll be cool in a painful kind of way. There’ll be a lot of standing around, which is hell in the cold (it’s -10F up there right now).

    • efgoldman

       /  October 21, 2011

      Maybe you can get Lisa (of Ice Road truckers) to give you an autograph.

    • I don’t know why exactly, but this makes me insanely jealous.

      I think I’m an American, blood and bone, and Americans are travelers. Plus which: I did my own traveling for awhile there, but now I’m sitting still. It’s a damn fine place to sit, but man would I like to be next to you in the truck.

      I hope all goes well!

      • Ian

         /  October 21, 2011

        Thanks! I’m skeptical that we’ll be able to fix the problem, but I’m looking forward to the drive. And yeah, it’s a privilege to get sent to these places. My first five years up here I was stuck in Fairbanks, but over the last two I’ve been to Southeast, the Seward Peninsula, Aleutians East, Aleutians West, the Alaska Range, the White Mountains, and, uh, Anchorage. I’m a lucky person.

  9. David L

     /  October 21, 2011

    Apparently, there was big news in the LA area yesterday as a 14-year-old Autistic boy walked away from an airport terminal in Burbank.

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/10/frantic-search-for-autistic-boy-who-wander-from-bob-hope-airport.html

    This blog says that he went to The Abbey, a gay club in West Hollywood, because he is gay, was apparently being sent off because he is gay, and thought he would be safe there.

    http://www.wehoconfidential.com/2011/10/teen-boy-flees-airport-turns-up-at.html

    I take this story with a grain of salt, given that it’s an nth-hand version of something said by a teenage boy with a learning disability, but if it is true, there are just no words for the heartbreak and anger. At least none that I would use on somebody else’s blog.

    • Even if the details are not exactly as portrayed, I don’t see how this story is anything but heart-breaking. What I can’t figure out is the “being sent away again” piece — by whom, to whom, from what circumstance, to what circumstance? If you learn more, will you please leave a link?

      • David L

         /  October 21, 2011

        I did see an article which said that he was on his way to “a special school in Salt Lake City” without attributing who the source of that information was. That’s vague enough that it could be literally true that he’s attending some sort of boarding school that caters to the special needs of autistic students, or a euphemism for an ex-gay program.

        The tone of that article is part of why I am taking it with a grain of salt. It’s repeating hearsay as fact without any citations. I accept at face value that he’s gay, doesn’t want to go to whatever was waiting for him in Utah, and thought he could find sanctuary among other gay people. What isn’t clear to me is whether he really was going off to this school because he was gay or if this was just his perception when the actual reasons were unconnected.

        Of course, it’s still very upsetting that it’s not just plausible that parent(s) would send their child off to some kind of live-in facility just to change his sexuality, but something that actually does happen, whether or not it’s happening in this instance.

        • Yeah, the tone of the second article isn’t very convincing. But I have to admit that I started to wonder just how “autistic” this kid is.

  10. ralphdibny

     /  October 21, 2011

    I just mentioned The Princess Bride upthread, which reminded me:

    11 year old Andre the Giant being driven to school every day by Irish playwright Samuel Beckett is the best story I have heard all year, and could be the basis of the greatest buddy movie of all time.

  11. dmf

     /  October 21, 2011

    the prez says US troops out of Iraq by years end, one war down one to go…

    • I find myself having a hard time being happy about this. The mess we created was so enormous, I can’t help feeling like we were a bull in a china shop, we Krazy Glued a few of the plates, and now we’re off….

      I suppose if I focus on the actual troops and their families, though, I can find some genuine joy.

      • dmf

         /  October 21, 2011

        yes, lets hope they find safe landings stateside and a country which won’t forget their sacrifices, still end of a war is worth noting.

        • CitizenE

           /  October 22, 2011

          Albeit not with a bang, but a whimper. Insofar as I understand it, twas because the Iraqis would not give a get out of jail card to all American troops stationed there no matter what they did while on or off the job. Amazing how they could not explain that to us in ways we might have understood. I want one of those for perpetuity for me and my descendants as well–amnesty for any and everything.

          And so…besides the mayhem and dislocation, what will become of those gigantic bases, our gigantic embassy, the gigantic amount of loot that was lost through the cracks of the rubble?

      • taylor16

         /  October 21, 2011

        Yeah, this is why I’m happy about the news. These guys/gals are doing their fourth, fifth, sixth tour. It’s time to bring them home to their families.

        I agree that we never should have been there in the first place and that we caused a lot of damage that we’re leaving unfixed. That’s troubling.

        But let’s get the troops home, and then perhaps there is room for some humanitarian aid or something similar to continue to help with the rebuilding process. We can’t undo the past; all we can is try to move forward. This seems like the best course of action.

      • efgoldman

         /  October 21, 2011

        What he’s been doing, as best he can, is following along with a dustpan, brush and shop-vac, cleaning up behind the Bush/Cheney mess.
        The best thing would have been not to start the damned thing in the first place, of course. But you can’t [choose your favorite “what’s done is done” metaphor here. Toothpaste/tube is a favorite.]

  12. caoil

     /  October 21, 2011

    I think I circulated this too late on twitter to catch anyone, so am replicating here, if anyone’s interested in signing.

    Oh – corkingiron, before I forget, last night Emily mentioned some kind of cross-Canada labour walk and I said I wasn’t sure what she meant but that we should ask you.

    Thirdly, after getting all the way through the Atlantic’s WWII photo galleries, I sincerely, completely, absolutely want someone to make a movie of this woman (Lyudmila Pavlichenko), and one of any combination of these women. Get on it, indie filmmakers!*

    *Note: if I win the lottery I’ll make these movies myself

  13. dmf

     /  October 21, 2011

  14. My cat Tehya wants to make it clear that she wants ear rubs every time I sit at the computer now.

    • efgoldman

       /  October 21, 2011

      Better do it, lest she walk all over the keyboard and end up sending inappropriate emails to somebody.

    • ‘Cause she’s no fool.

      • efgoldman

         /  October 21, 2011

        Hey, my kid’s cat apparently ordered Chines for six that way. From China.

    • David L

       /  October 21, 2011

      Since the weather here has been so nice the last few days, I have been reduced from the dear but long-lost friend to the window opener when I get home from work. No more “OMG! I missed you so much!”, just a leap into the nearest windowsill.

  15. Sorn

     /  October 21, 2011

    Hi all,

    I’m getting rather discouraged on the Job front, and I’m not sure what to do. It’s really hard not to take all of the rejections personally. My personall belief is that I have a very strong set of skills, and would be a good asset at any Job, but I’m in the recent college graduate trap in an ecconomy that has no use for anyone under 30. My finances are running thin, and so also is my self-confidence.

    I know I’ve posted about this before, and I don’t want to sound like a broken record, but it’s hard not to take things personally. If things don’t open up soon I’m going to go fishing up in Alaska for a season, because the bottom is out of the tub. The comercial fishing people have a meeting here on the 18th of November, and I imagine the work will be hard, but sometimes it takes a lot of hard work to get somewhere meaningfull. I learned that these past 5 years in college. It was 2 miles from my house to the college and for want of a car, because the V.A. stipend would only carry so far I walked that distance every day, and montana winters can get cold.

    The crazy thing about being underemployed is that it has started to erode my sense of place in the world. I was raised to believe that character mattered more than money, and that if a person worked hard, and was resonably lucky, life would be just. Unfortunately, it hasn’t seemed to be the case. But who knows, maybe I’m learning skills that will benefit me later on. Often we can’t see what we gain from adversity until after the crisis has passed.

    • Ian

       /  October 21, 2011

      Fishing will be interesting if you get on a boat. Otherwise, just hard drudge work. Have you thought about the Peace Corps at all? That would take you out of the job market for a couple years, but in a way that will enhance your resume rather than make it look weirder. More importantly, you’ll learn stuff, and it will open up some grad school opportunities.

      • Sorn

         /  October 21, 2011

        Unfortunately I can’t do the peace corps for another 5 years, clearance issues, from when I was in the service.

        • Ian

           /  October 21, 2011

          See my comment below. Tried to reply to you and screwed it up somehow.

        • dmf

           /  October 21, 2011

          hey sorn, i know the feeling all too well, this is part of why i have been encouraging you to look into getting into teaching high school history or social studies (many history programs now have dual masters or at least teachers cert programs), you can always go back like i did to later get a doctorate but having that professional masters is a good safety-net (tho these days nothing is a sure bet). all too many folks in the same boat (pardon any pun) for this to be about you as a person but hard not to take it that way, fishing in the great white north is a bit dangerous and lots of drunkenness ensues (have had several friends go that route) but after the military shouldn’t be too unfamiliar. hope something breaks your way soon, d.

    • I am so sorry honey, and I can really understand and relate. It is, as you say, very hard to not take this crap personally — I spent half of Tuesday with tears running down my face after having been rejected by an outlet that wouldn’t have even paid me. It’s very, very, very hard to keep getting back up with a sense of purpose and an unbattered sense of self.

      I send you many good wishes and all the empathy I have. The fishing actually sounds like a great temporary fall-back position, and I like Ian’s suggestions, too. You need never apologize for complaining about your current fate — it sucks, and that’s just the way it is.

    • SWNC

       /  October 21, 2011

      I am so sorry to hear about your troubles. Any employer would be darn lucky to have you.

      The crazy thing about being underemployed is that it has started to erode my sense of place in the world. I was raised to believe that character mattered more than money, and that if a person worked hard, and was resonably lucky, life would be just. Unfortunately, it hasn’t seemed to be the case.
      I know exactly what you mean. It’s hard and it sucks. I’ve been trying really hard to focus on finding fulfillment outside of paid work. I think that in the US, it can be especially hard to remember that we are not our jobs. Just from the little I know of you on-line, your character, resolution, and intelligence are sterling and would be no matter what you do for a living.

    • I appreciate what it took to write that & post it publicly, Sorn.

      And there isn’t much anyone can say that will make things different or even make you feel better.

      What counts, I think, is that you have a place that you can write this & that you know people will listen to you, really hearing you.

      Do you have people you can hang with during the week? Maybe sit around a fire and tell stories, talk about stuff, share things? That can help.

      And, pardon me for asking this if you’ve explained it, but can you leave Montana and try another state? Maybe there just isn’t enough work for your field in Montana.

      I’m sorry things are rough for you. I’m hoping things will change for you soon.

    • wearyvoter

       /  October 22, 2011

      Sorn:

      I’m so sorry to hear that. I’m keeping fingers crossed, etc.

      My oldest niece was hired straight out of college, then got clobbered in the downturn. After two years of underemployment, she signed up for a program where she teaches English to middle school kids in South Korea. (Side note: Her degree is NOT in English.) The good news is that she’s enjoying the adventure. The bad news is that she’s on the other side of the world. Fortunately, there’s Skype and all that other good stuff for staying in touch.

      Her first year is nearly up; she’s considering signing up for a second year. She’s saving up to go back for a master’s degree.

    • CitizenE

       /  October 22, 2011

      There’s always opportunity in frustration, but it isn’t always easy to spot. While I feel DMF’s comment, mine is this: don’t teach unless you’d love to, and don’t teach high schoolers unless you really like that age group. Teaching is not easy, and you have to have some grease for the wheels to make it work. Too many teachers are living day to day like Camus’ Sisyphus after the King of the Underworld finally caught up to him. And there is something to be said, while being young and an American scholar for the advantages of physical labor. Now, if when it comes to teaching, you feel it, then that’s a different story.

      Meanwhile in retirement land, meaning I have a few more months, my first application for a job–working in a museum giftshop–led me to realize I am under-qualified for standing at a cash register. Like Rachel Maddow, I suppose, my self esteem had been overrated. And then the pie in the face come to Jesus moment realizing that an employer’s understanding of flexible hours is that the employee has to be flexible, not the employer. Just stretching out my fingers, though, getting in practice for getting ready to get back in the game.

      • I’m in the process of expanding my job search to the very limits of what I might be capable of doing and this I am under-qualified for standing at a cash register strikes just a smidge bit too close to the bone, thank you very much.

  16. Ian

     /  October 21, 2011

    I was wondering about that. Didn’t know what you did in the service. After you go to this fishing meeting, let me know what you’re considering. I know some people in Dutch who might be able to offer some impartial information.

    You might also look into teaching in a village. You seem perfect for that, and God knows they need good people. Getting certified would take a little time, but you might be able to do some of it via distance ed. The state’s job website is here:

    https://alexsys.labor.state.ak.us/

    Nothing wrong with fishing, but there’s plenty else you could do up here. And there’s always this:

    http://www.dps.state.ak.us/ast/vpso/default.aspx

  17. David L

     /  October 21, 2011

    I keep seeing the title of this post and thinking that someone has mistyped “Khal”. I may need help.

    • It’s ok. I hang out with you guys, and I had to google “Khal.” You would think I would know by now, by sheer cyber-osmosis.