The boss? Still on walkabout, apparently. This is – an Open Thread.

No sure where TNC is today (other than in DC, still), but the people need their open thread! And so — the student lounge is now open. Late brunch is being served off to the left (of course). Please tip your wait staff.

PS: I just posted about Occupy Wall Street. Feel free to yell at me/agree with me in the comments there.

215 Comments

  1. First?

    I just wanted to say good luck, we’re all counting on you.;

  2. JHarper2

     /  October 14, 2011

    Walks into lounge, sits down in comfy chair, puts feet up on coffee table, oops sees Emily looking from across the room, puts feet on floor.

    Foolishness for Friday.

    The one-ell lama is a priest,
    The two-ell llama is a beast
    And I’ll bet my new pajama,
    there’s no such thing as a three-ell lllama.

    A funny thing is a ketchup bottle,
    first none’ll come, and then a lottle.

    One women’s Mede is another women’s Persian

    One man’s meat is another man’s poisson.

    • Oh, feet TOTALLY back on the table. When I say the couch is comfy, I do mean it.

      Also, this? “One women’s Mede is another women’s Persian” Your Middle East Studies geek hostess thanks you.

      • JHarper2

         /  October 14, 2011

        My Dad’s jokes did run to the corny, as you can see.

        • That first, at least, I recognize as Ogden Nash. The second one I haven’t seen before, but it sounds suspiciously Nashish too.

        • efgoldman

           /  October 14, 2011

          Was that your dad? Because it seems to me an awful lot like Ogden Nash.
          Unless he was your dad.

          • efgoldman

             /  October 14, 2011

            And ferdzy much quicker on the trigger than I am.
            I saw Ogden Nash live, back when there was a Boston Arts Festival in the Public Garden. They had a fenced-off performance area.
            Also saw/heard Martyn Greene in some slapped-together Gilbert & Sullivan.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martyn_Green
            This was *after* he’d lost the lower part of his leg in an accident. He still did little dance turns in the patter songs, to huge ovations.

          • JHarper2

             /  October 14, 2011

            No, not my Dad, just his sense of humour, he loved to quote from the Golden Trashery of Ogden Nashery.

            • Yes! My father has that book and many a happy hour I spent with it as a kid. I can still quote quite a quarter of it.

  3. I’m making chocolate cake AND coconut soup today. Now that’s hedonism.

    • OOOH, is the soup with lime? Or lemon grass?

      … can I have some?

      • This recipe calls for lime and lemongrass . . . so I went out to my lemongrass plant in the back yard and picked a stalk. And you can definitely have some.

    • SWNC

       /  October 14, 2011

      When are we supposed to arrive for dinner?

    • socioprof

       /  October 14, 2011

      Mmmm. What time should we show up?

    • To SWNC, socioprof et al. – say 6 o’clock? Someone can bring the wine.

    • helensprogeny

       /  October 14, 2011

      Definitely coming for dinner. I’m just making granola. Which is nice, but not chocolate cake and coconut soup.

      • I have an old hippie cookbook with a recipe for “toasted grain cereal” in it – i.e., the word “granola” had not been invented/popularized yet.

      • SWNC

         /  October 14, 2011

        Yeah, we’re having beans and rice. A dinner party with the Horde sounds much more appealing.

    • Treat yo’self!

  4. from my “this is what class warfare looks like” series: Budget cuts push communities to remove fluoride from drinking water

    • Thank you for linking to that here. I didn’t get a chance to go the other day, and I really, really like the premise.

    • That’s not budget cuts. Down here in Pinellas County, the commission is under the control of the Teabagger/Bircher crowd who think it’s a Communist plot against our purity of essence.

  5. I’m wearing my fabulous girly skirt + “I can kill you with my brain” t-shirt outfit, fully intending to wear it to this afternoon’s Brownie meeting (if asked by the girls, I’ll tell them “It means I’m smart and I love it”), even though the 70 degree temps are gone and we’re now hovering around 59/61 — because I must wear it a few more times before winter eats my soul!!!

    But ladies no longer where teh panty-hose, and it’s pretty chilly in my house, where I am sitting still and typing — so I finally just put flannel pants on under the skirt, until I leave for Brownies. I WILL NOT BE DEFEATED.

    • mythopoeia

       /  October 14, 2011

      I fully approve of this. Did I mention you’ve convinced me it’s a good idea to buy that shirt for an insanely smart, Firefly-adoring friend of mine? I’m eagerly contemplating Christmas.

      • You did! (Now if someone would just give me Firefly for Hanukkah so I could place the reference better…!)

    • socioprof

       /  October 14, 2011

      I’ve got to get that shirt.

      • Right after you and I parted ways that day, a beautifully dressed older African American woman stopped me in my tracks — literally held out a hand so that I wouldn’t go any further — read the shirt out loud, cracked the hell up, and said “Right on, sister!”

        : )!

    • scone

       /  October 14, 2011

      Tights?

      • You’d think. For some reason — probably related to my height & the fact that tights require me to go monochromatic in a way that would require additional purchases, like the right shoes — I own no tights.

        • socioprof

           /  October 14, 2011

          Oh, we need to go shopping. I love crazy tights with crazy shoes. Patterns, colors, textures, colored patterns, textured patterns. Tights are my thing.

          • SWNC

             /  October 14, 2011

            Same here. A sweater, skirt and tights is my go-to fall and winter look.

          • I will not say no to shopping!

            Though knowing me, I will probably say no to crazy tights. I once bought some bright red shoes and couldn’t bring myself to wear them as much as once. I will trundle along in your wake and take notes!

        • watson42

           /  October 14, 2011

          You should check out the knee socks (that’s what they call them, though they come up to mid-thigh) socks at Dr. Martens. I am completely lusting after some, though I am not in the target age range for them by *ahem* a bit of a margin.

      • As long as we can all agree that tights are not pants.

    • helensprogeny

       /  October 14, 2011

      Plus, you can still wear it secretly under a sweater all winter long. Not exactly the same thing, I know, since no one can see it. But YOU will be able to see it and know that it is true, which is almost as good.

    • I’m changing into the little black dress i scored at Crafty Bastards for the folger tonight. I just really need the only other person here but me to leave so I can do so.

      Thought he’s so oblivious, I could probably change, and he wouldn’t notice.

  6. osbenz

     /  October 14, 2011

    Being something of a neophyte around these parts I was mistakenly pedantic on a prior post that referenced the blackness of Teena Marie. For that I offer a mea culpa.

    I also was partially mistaken in defining blackness in a racial context (please read what follows before jumping on this) and I’d like to flesh that out in the proper forum (which I believe this is) as it does pertain to a recent general theme. Let me say, first off, that I recognize black identity is not to be imposed and is sufficiently complex to defy precise definition. That said, I’ll note that, linguistically, this is a conceptional meaning of black. Furthermore, it is a conceptional meaning that has yet to become widely understood in the racially black community.* To wit:

    Appiah observes that he had previously assumed most educated people already knew and accepted that biological classifications of race are incoherent and empirically unsupported. He was surprised to learn that many educated Americans he talked to were not familiar with or did not accept this idea, despite much recent academic discussion of race as a social construction. That is, he was struck by the stubborn persistence of conceptual confusion about race; and he thinks there is a short step from this confusion to the incoherence of African American social identity. He finds that black nationalists in particular—counting many educated, middle-class African Americans among them—seem ardently attached to an incoherent biological essentialism about race, as represented by their commitment to the one-drop rule, notwithstanding the circulation of corrective information.

    Given that, it should be unsurprising that well-intentioned non-black people have a linguistically pragmatic understanding of blackness as a simple matter of race. Going further, outside of the presence of black people well versed in black studies this meaning should be dominant in a non-black person’s understanding of what constitutes blackness (and note that I’m not saying such knowledge is to be presumed). More broadly, pragmatic competence, in general, is itself virtuous. On my part, I regret presuming that the meaning of blackness could be discussed in a non-conceptual manner without first clarifying.

    http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/content/BPL_Images/Journal_Samples/PAPA0048-3915~32~2~10%5C010.pdf

    • On the one hand, welcome!

      On the other: I am walking very carefully here, because I’m a smidge suspicious that you might be one of the people who was just banned at TNC’s place (which, by the way, this is only a notional branch of. He has nothing to do with this blog, and though I know he’s read it in the past, I have no way of knowing if even glances at my ad-hoc alternative Open Threads). Let me just say this: There will be no mean-spirited behavior on these Open Threads, period. Though we are not actually connected in any way, I am emotionally and mentally of a very similar bent to TNC, and so: Whatever might get a person banned there, will get them banned here.

      And with that: Off to the races!

      • Dex

         /  October 14, 2011

        So what you’re saying is that Craig isn’t allowed to post here?

        • No. He’s been Grumpy Grandfathered in.

          • Where’s teh LIKE buttons?

          • Harrumph.

          • efgoldman

             /  October 14, 2011

            No. He’s been Grumpy Grandfathered in.
            Me too, also too. Even though I’m not a grandfather.
            [Not using this thread as an excuse. Not me, no sir. Even though my progeny is away for the weekend, she reads these things on her phone-like-computing-device. No further on this topic, no sir!]

        • OH OH OH, Dex!

          Where should the Chicago Horde go on Sunday the 23rd at about 8:00 pm? And will you be able to join us?

          • Dex

             /  October 14, 2011

            Oh, sorry. I had the feeling I had missed a bunch of posts because of a crazy couple of weeks. I can’t make it, as my parents are visiting from Canada. Did you guys pick a neighborhood and a type of establishment?

            • Parents!

              :: shakes fist ::

              No, we didn’t pick a place, and I would be so so so so SO grateful if you could pick one for us (small group friendly + accessible to public), or even just remind me of the address of the last one, and we’ll go back there.

              • Dex

                 /  October 14, 2011

                I seem to recall seeing a post asking for a reasonably-priced place. I really like Piece. They make awesome thin crust pizza and brew their own beer. There’s also Big Star, which makes a variety of tacos, all of them yummy. They do a variety of drinks, alcoholic and non. Both places are a stone’s throw from the Damen Blue Line stop. Both places should be okay on a Sunday night. The place we were at last time is Elephant and Castle. I believe it was on Jackson, near the Willis Tower. There’s another one slightly further north as well.

                • Thank you! I’m trying for something which can handle dinner, drinks, and/or dessert, given the various mealtimes/budgets/drinking-or-not of the people involved, so maybe Elephant and Castle would still be the best bet…? Though Big Star appeals to the taco lover in me. Hmmm. I’ll have to look at some menus.

          • socioprof

             /  October 14, 2011

            I’m down (I think). I’ll be looking for the deets.

      • osbenz

         /  October 14, 2011

        I made a point of reading the house rules and intend to abide by them.

        With regard to your suspicion, I understand that. As a matter of fact, I’m not banned, but was met with derision (much of it well placed). That said, the above missive is what I was trying to get at (and would have if not for comment closing).

      • socioprof

         /  October 14, 2011

        “Off to the races”.

        hehe.

  7. JHarper2

     /  October 14, 2011

    This sentence is from an Atlantic Blog article on urban homesteaders wanting to carry out backyard slaughter:
    http://www.theatlantic.com/life/archive/2011/10/should-urban-farmers-be-allowed-to-slaughter-backyard-animals/246526/

    Thus far, the leading attempt to provide such information — a report put out by advocates of urban homesteading — does little more than thumb its nose at public opinion in order to satisfy the interests of a small minority of slaughter hobbyists.

    Slaughter hobbyists? Now I get that the author of What locavores get wrong may not be down with the idea of backyard abattoirs, I don’t think I would want one in my neighbours backyard, but this sentence seems more pejorative than probative to me. He does go on to detail his objections, but he lost me with the invective. Too much time with the Horde I think.

    • David L

       /  October 14, 2011

      Apparently, the studies done by the City of Oakland have laughably small samples, too. They’re getting eviscerated from all sides for this whole thing. The post I saw was from somewhere in the Paleo Diet community (which I kind of follow, although I’ve turned it mostly into “eat whole foods, don’t fear fat, limit grains” rather than the really prescriptive stuff you’ll see in the diet books) and as a result pretty in favor of allowing at-home slaughter because what’s more hunter-gatherer-like than killing your own meat? (There’s also a general libertarian bent to the whole community, and I’m not sure whether being tethered to a diet that goes against conventional wisdom is cause or effect there.)

      Unfortunately, it appears that I got the link I found that data from Twitter and on my other computer, so I can’t link it right now.

    • That reminds me of the time I was walking through Boston’s Chinatown and caught the scent of freshly killed chicken, which I recognized from my childhood.

    • I have to say that as a local food fanatic, I love the idea of keeping chickens in an urban or suburban yard and doing my own slaughtering.

      As an ex-landlord, I have to say the slaughtering part anyway, is a terrible idea. That’s a 100% refund money-back guaranteed statement.

      When we bought our apartment I wanted to start a compost pile. Mr. Ferdzy objected vociferously, saying it would not be properly maintained by the tenants. We had big arguments about it. Eventually he got smart and said that if the tenants did the recycling more-or-less correctly, I could have my compost heap. Guess what.

      • SWNC

         /  October 14, 2011

        My understanding is that slaughtering is a learned skill–you need to learn it from someone who knows what they’re doing and you need practice in order to do it right. My concern is that the animals and the neighbors would be the ones suffering from enthusiastic but totally untrained backyard chicken keepers slaughtering their own birds.

        (When my grandma was growing up, it was her job to kill, pluck and cook the chicken for Sunday dinner. She did not remember that task fondly, and her stories have left me with absolutely no desire to experience it myself.)

    • Ian

       /  October 14, 2011

      Yes, that’s a bad article. He spends most of his time debunking the report, which is a weird strategy when most of your readers won’t be familiar with the issue itself, let along the report. He makes good points in the last two paragraphs, but what a slog to get there.

      My objections have less to do with slaughter than with keeping farm animals in urban environments in the first place. Think of the enforcement burden for local government. There’s the impact on neighbors (noise, smell, etc.), but also the problem of animal welfare. When you have relaxed rules about what kinds of animals people can have and how many, you wind up dealing with many, many more neglected animals. Policing that will cost.

  8. caoil

     /  October 14, 2011

    Thank you for the link via Twitter to that we are the 1% tumblr, Emily. I tried to read some of it but apparently I’m too emotional today to read anything particularly political. Anyone have any fluffy kittens or rambunctious puppies or sparkly unicorns to share, that I might distract myself with?
    (Today is Not A Great Day)

    • The Great Dane of Love offers you hugs and a sturdy shoulder….

      Great Dane of Love

      • caoil

         /  October 14, 2011

        That is very cute. Big dogs are so galoomphy.

        • My former downstairs neighbors had a great dane. He had clearly just had a growth spurt and wasn’t quite sure what to do with his enormous body.

          • My a-couple-of-doors-down neighbor has a Great Dane. As a former Dachshund owner, I am in a constant struggle to be understanding of the fact that, as responsible as his owners are, he will occasionally need to pee at inopportune times, and a Great Dane’s pee will never be anything within the realm of my Dachshund experience.

            • Yeah… there would occasionally be dribbles on the walk that were clearly dog pee, not plain water. Not the end of the world.

              I remember the first time I saw Brutus, I was just moving in and they had placed some very tall bar chairs in the door. In fact the legs were so high that I couldn’t figure out what they would be able to keep in. Then I saw the great dane peeking over the top of the chairs and understood.

    • SWNC

       /  October 14, 2011

      I will confess that I watched this video more than once this morning: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlzgwdVEt00

      (It’s a bulldog loving on cute little twin babies and making them giggle and giggle. It’s the sweetest damn thing ever.)

  9. I’m bone-tired today. Feel like I’m battling the unwashed hordes with a single red pen.

    COPY-EDITORS PROVIDE REAL VALUE, PEOPLE.

    • mythopoeia

       /  October 14, 2011

      As your comrade-in-arms, I must ask: why use a hyphenated compound for your job? Usually I see it opened or closed.
      😉

      • I was having fun, like not buttoning the top button of my button-down shirt.

        Rebel without a clause, I am.

        • I would not like to admit how hard this made me giggle.

          Also: GOD DAMN IT YES. Copy editors are not expendable, Media Powers!

          • dave in texas

             /  October 14, 2011

            And yet they seem to have been the first casualties of the downsizing explosion (or should that be implosion?). The Austin American-Statesman would get flunked by my 8th grade English teacher on a near-daily basis for its sloppiness and usage mistakes.

            • I’ve written a lot for the Dallas Morning News over the years and they seem to be mostly holding it together, but I think that’s through the sheer grit of the editors.

            • wearyvoter

               /  October 14, 2011

              A copy editor friend of mine dropped a letter to our local paper a few weeks ago, pleading with them to get a human on their staff to eyeball their print and online product before they take it live. (I suspect they’re using spell check for cleanup.) Copy editors also function as fact checkers, and there are times when that function seems to be sorely lacking at that particular paper. I know of several people around our town who red pencil the Sunday issue of the paper, just for fun.

      • JHarper2

         /  October 14, 2011

        I don’t have a dog in this fight, and wouldn’t get between two copy editors/copyeditors/copy-editors fighting this out, any more than I would get between TNC and Herman Cain discussing Howard v Morehead but:
        1. This is so Meta, and
        2. FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT! Hey everyone, its on over here.

    • corkingiron

       /  October 14, 2011

      I always told my students that the letter “l” served a vital function in the word “public”.

      • wearyvoter

         /  October 14, 2011

        Yes, it does.

      • Ian

         /  October 14, 2011

        Recently one of our techs requested a pubic IP address.

        • David L

           /  October 14, 2011

          Well, there’s no shortage of those on the internet…

        • Let me guess. Your supervisor won’t let your techs get spelling help.

          “If they can’t spell, I don’t want ’em!”

          (And yes, I know the joke was the “pubic” thing, but work with me here. I’m bringing things full circle).

  10. David L

     /  October 14, 2011

    Blog flog: I got annoyed enough reading some of yesterday’s back-and-forth on the OWS thread that I ended up blogging about it and just posted a couple of minutes ago.

    http://unreal-estate.net/bog/2011/10/14/what-occupy-wall-street-wants/

    Another couple of ideas in the pipe: Gays and policing of identity (which I’ve posted about in an OTAN before but keep seeing other examples), and “Gay bars: Where safe spaces and wishing to be non-discriminatory collide. With booze.”

  11. This week I’ve been playing office furniture scavenger. I now have:
    Not one, but TWO filing cabinets, of useful size.
    Inboxes for all incoming paperwork instead of folders.
    A new (to me) desk that is 84in instead of 75in, gaining me extra
    space to function
    The only desk drawer to be found in this set of desks. There is
    suddenly ROOM on the desk top…so much so I even can put my picture
    of Rob where I can see him.

    I am inordinately pleased with myself.

    • JHarper2

       /  October 14, 2011

      And when your box avoiding work mate asks where did all the cool stuff come from, you can say that you are not afraid to lift and move things.
      Ani B for the win.

      • I’m a horrible person about that. She announced (literally the next day) that she’s expecting.

        *hangs head in shame*

        • JHarper2

           /  October 14, 2011

          Now me too
          /hangs head in shame as well.

          • efgoldman

             /  October 14, 2011

            Last time I looked, pregnancy was not a disability.
            In fact, when we last discussed ani’s workmate, over at TNC, I noted that mrs efgoldman was doing eight shows a week in the old, rickety, stair-climby Wilbur Theater in Boston, well into her seventh month.

            [:::Ducks and covers, because he knows the incoming is on its way:::]

            • watson42

               /  October 14, 2011

              Not all pregnancies are the same. I know someone who wasn’t allowed to lift anything over 3 lbs while she was pregnant. It made her crazy. I know someone else who ran a marathon in her 1st trimester, but after delivery wasn’t allowed to lift ANYTHING or walk up stairs for eight weeks. It was 12+ weeks before the doctors said she could hold her own baby i.e. she had worked up to being able to hold (though not lift) 15 lbs.

            • scone

               /  October 14, 2011

              Legally, actually, pregnancy must be treated as a temporary disability (assuming the employee wants it to be treated as such). (Pregnancy Discrimination Act ftw!)

  12. mythopoeia

     /  October 14, 2011

    I am giving myself the Friday present of not reading Kate Bolick’s cover article, much as I adore the Atlantic. I decided this after reading the first few paragraphs and hitting the plaint: “EVERYTHING OUR SEXUALLY LIBERATED MOTHERS TOLD US HAD A DOWNSIDE!”

    I’m 23. I spent the formative years of my young womanhood reading Double X, Sandra Tsing Loh, Hanna Rosin. I’m done. I don’t need another article telling me that all! the expectations! have downsides! I’ve decided it’s time to plug my fingers in my ears, ignore the expectations and all the women yelling about where the expectations have gotten us, and go carve out my life.

    Why yes, expectations are woven into the fabric of society and the personal is political and all that. But at certain point I feel like you have to put blinders on, because they’re the only way you can focus on the horizon.

    • SWNC

       /  October 14, 2011

      The article is such a dang mess. You’ve given yourself a wise gift.

      • What a mess indeed. And what bugs me the most is that there probably is a productive conversation to be had about these issues. Now that there are more options, how do we make those kinds of decisions and how can we ameliorate the downsides? Part of me can understand why people want to make absolutist statements because not having to make decisions can be liberating, but it’s not as if they’re going away, so we might as well try to deal with reality rather than wishing for a mythic past.

        • mythopoeia

           /  October 14, 2011

          I am right there with you. How do you think we should start?

          • While it a good thing overall, the expansion of choices means that we probably need to start telling people early that a) they will have to make choices, b) some of those choices will preclude other choices and c) none of those choices are necessarily right or wrong. It’s tough to balance that with “you can do anything you want”, which is still a fairly necessary tonic to lingering expectations.

            Admittedly, that applies to a whole host of different things these days, not just romance and careers. And because they’re ultimately all personal choices, there aren’t broad prescriptions to be made. So it seems like the focus then becomes supporting the choices that people make and trying to make the compromises less onerous (more affordable schooling, childcare, etc).

            So yeah, I’m not entirely sure. We’re still pushing back against a lot of cultural baggage, so it’s hard to know how and when we’ll find a more comfortable equilibrium.

            • mythopoeia

               /  October 14, 2011

              I think every item on that list is an excellent one. Let’s spread this gospel.

          • helensprogeny

             /  October 14, 2011

            I think that what you suggest for yourself about ignoring the expectations and going forth and carving out a life for yourself on your own terms (to the extent that is possible) is a real beginning.

            • mythopoeia

               /  October 14, 2011

              In fact, that particular approach to life was suggested to me when I first started reading all those writers–by my boyfriend at the time. One of those things where you know the answer is right intellectually but it takes you a few years to grow into living it.

            • mythopoeia

               /  October 14, 2011

              (and whoops, there’s no edit button)–also, thanks so much! That gives me hope.

              • helensprogeny

                 /  October 14, 2011

                All I know is that so far, it’s worked for me. I wish you all luck in finding all the paths you want to go down in your life. The older I get, the more I realize that my life really is my own responsibility and I am eternally grateful to the women who went before me and opened up society to the point where I have had real choices available to me. I might end up regretting some of the roads not taken. It’s how life works, always. But at least I had a multiplicity of roads to choose from.

    • BJonthegrid

       /  October 14, 2011

      Why didn’t you stop me. I read it. I don’t regret getting married late but I do regret reading that “article”?

  13. Is anyone going to the meetup tonight and here? I just realised I don’t have contact info for anyone except KCox, and she’s not going.

    • If you know of anyone planning on going who has in the past commented here, I could shoot them an email for you.

    • scone

       /  October 14, 2011

      I think I’m coming – but it depends on work. I can give you my email if you’d like, though!

      • Mostly looking for the ability to text people so that they know i’m there and where we’re sitting. People might recognize me…but I’m not counting on it, you know?

        • scone

           /  October 14, 2011

          If I can make it, I will definitely recognize you!

  14. I just wanted to tell you good luck. We’re all counting on you.

  15. JHarper2

     /  October 14, 2011

    This at first read seems funny but:
    Really if the Beeb or another broadcaster is providing this service, simple respect would seem to dictate taking it seriously enough to make an effort to do it properly.

    A moment’s violence?

    “The BBC has been criticized by deaf groups over ‘ludicrous’ computer-generated subtitles which have labelled the Labour leader ‘Ed Miller Band’ [Ed Miliband] and announced ‘a moment’s violence’ for the Queen Mother,” The Telegraph reports. “Hard-of-hearing viewers have been left ‘utterly perplexed’ by errors in the live captions – which have also renamed the Ireland rugby team ‘Island.’ Deaf people have expressed their shock at being told a town was expecting a visit from the ‘Arch bitch of Canterbury’ during one local BBC news broadcast. … The blunders have become so regular that a dedicated website has been set up by bemused viewers.”

    Does anyone know how the subtitles/captions are done? Are they generated automatically from voice recognition or is it people typing quickly and hoping they get it sort of right?

    • David L

       /  October 14, 2011

      The “computer-generated” in that quote leads me to believe that the BBC is using speech-recognition software. It seems to be more and more common, but it produces some sound alike errors. IIRC, CNN’s software tended to turn Tripoli into “triply” if a reporter with an English accent glossed over the o in the same way that “globally” would turn into “globe-ly”. Occasionally, it has some pretty hilarious effects, but I have the advantage of being able to sound out what word they really meant.

      AIUI, any captions done “live” by a human in the US are done via a device that is similar to a court reporter’s keyboard, where words are entered roughly phonetically through pressing of multiple keys at a time, and occasionally the combination of presses doesn’t map to the right word, but I’ll usually see those corrected more or less immediately.

      A lot of local news operations seem to just run the script as captions as it goes through the TelePrompTer, which can create issues of its own when they fly through the transcriptions of taped reports and doesn’t include anything ad-libbed.

  16. Hey, are any of the Toronto gang here? Lucas? Anyone? I was thinking I would, health permitting, head downtown tomorrow to check out the first day of Occupy Bay Street – anyone want to meet up?

    Plus also, thanks for hosting, Emily!

    • Hello!

      Although I wouldn’t say Toronto gang, exactly, so no. I’ll be going to Foodstock on Sunday. That’ll be my activism for the week.

      • Ooooh, I hadn’t heard about that! Tempting … hmmmmm … my health isn’t really trustworthy enough that I could commit to being that far from home for that long, and yet … so tempting!

        And you are SO one of the Toronto gang. Or we could call it the Ontario gang in your honor.

        • Well emotionally I’m definitely part of the Toronto gang! It’s the 2 hours of driving just to hit the outskirts part that keeps me out. I guess I can say I’ll be there in spirit.

          Sorry to hear you are having health problems.

          I’m thinking (and hoping, really, because this is an important issue for Ontarians) that Foodstock will be a total zoo. I’m also hoping that people will really start making the connections between this clusterfuck and NAFTA. I don’t believe in hell, but Brian Mulroney and pals have what it takes to make me wish I did.

          • Oh yes. I was in Mexico while NAFTA was being negotiated. Everyone there kept saying, well, yes, OUR representatives are rolling over for the Americans on protections for workers and the environment, but surely the Canadians will save us? Alas poor Mexico. And poor Ontario too.

  17. I’m trying to mostly stay away from OWS threads because inequality in this country has been my binkie for a very long time and I cannot be remotely objective about a movement that is cutting to the quick about it. It makes me happy, and it feels like a Genuine Thing, and that is all that I will say.

    So!

    I feel like I do this every year (maybe not with you people, but with someone) but, gimme recommendations for horror movies that I may have missed acus it’s Halloween coming up which is my 2nd favorite holiday in the universe (my first favorite is Thanksgiving, so it’s a very happy few weeks for me and then a dark, depressing 11 months of shite holidays like Arbor Day.)

    • But… but… white boys with dreadlocks!!1!

      Oh, okay….

      :: kicks a can ::

    • I don’t usually do horror movies, but I think it’s cute that you’re happy about something instead of Furious.

    • Ian

       /  October 14, 2011

      Kwaidan is pretty good:

      More eerie than horrific.

    • caoil

       /  October 14, 2011

      I’m not good with horror movies as a genre (especially the gory kind which is what most of them have been lately). Having said that, I watch “The Changeling” (George C. Scott, not Angie) every year. It may be old but it still plays on all my old (house) fears. Were I a braver lass I would probably make a day of it with “The Orphanage” and “The Others”. :-/ There’s a fourth movie I’m thinking of but title’s not coming to me.

    • Because I’m a theatre geek:

      Stagefright is a relatively obscure Italian slasher, in which a troupe of actors are rehearsing a musical about a serial killer. They happen to be rehearsing near a mental institution where the killer in question is held, he breaks loose, and he gets locked in with them when the monstrous director of the show decides he’s going to keep the actors there until they get their material right. It avoids a lot of the stupidity found in the slasher genre, and the climax is really, really well done.

      and:

      Theatre of Blood is a Vincent Price gem in which he plays a hammy Shakespearean actor who, after a failed suicide attempt, decides to get revenge on the theatre critics who scorned him by killing them with methods taken from Shakespeare’s plays. Not sure if it’s horror so much as black comedy, but either way it’s tons of fun.

  18. wearyvoter

     /  October 14, 2011

    Thank you for opening up the brunch lounge. I’m taking a few dribbles of vacation time this afternoon, and will be in and out. (I promise to shut the door carefully at all times. )

  19. Last night I wrote my obligatory post about the Mai Tai and how wonderfully flexible the drink can be.

    http://cocktailchem.blogspot.com/2011/10/tiki-classics-mai-tai-as-foundation.html

  20. dmf

     /  October 14, 2011

    anyone else have email to TNC returned to sender or is it just moi?

  21. BJonthegrid

     /  October 14, 2011

    Really sad news, this might get personal. I apologize in advance for any TMI. My 21 yr old niece has miscarried. She met her boyfriend while slugging in her Senior year of high school. We all met him, he said he was 24 which was bad enough but he was really 34 and married with 2 kids from two different women. His daughter is four years younger than my niece. Of course my niece knew everything all along, allowed him to deceive the rest of us and had no problems with it.

    My sister of course freaked. She sent her daughter to college a state away. They still saw each other. They still made their plans, he got separated and brought her a ring, showed up at family events like everything was hunky dory. Eventhough no one liked the situation, surprisingly no one did anything about it. None of the men tried to beat the crap out of him, none of the women shunned my niece. We all just hoped she would get a clue and dump him. When she announced her pregnancy that’s when it got ugly.

    My sister went ballistic. My niece is in her last year of college, and my sister is paying for all her expenses. The last two months they have been talking to each other through me. On Friday, my niece & boyfriend went to find out the sex of the baby and instead was told the baby isn’t viable. There was a follow up appointment today and my sister talked her way into going against my niece’s wishes.

    We had lunch at Wegamans with me sitting in the middle of them. I told my niece that she shouldn’t blame herself, pregnancy is sometimes a crap shoot. Then I asked her if she was relieved and it was like watching the Kubler Ross 7 stages of death in fast forward on her face. Finally she said yes. I asked her did she think we were relieved, she laughed and said you probably prayed for this. Her mother started crying (we’re in a grocery store by the seafood section!). I told my niece, no one wanted this for you. We talked quite a bit about her future, which is very bright. She is headstrong but smart and talented.

    I was going to go to the appointment with them but it was clear this was a mom/daughter thing, When I left them they were walking, holding hands and smiling. She’ll be okay.

    • Oh honey. I’m so glad that your niece has the support of her family, and most especially that she and her mom are back in touch. That is all so, so important. I hope it helps her make better, more self-affirming choices in the future. Hugs to you and yours.

    • socioprof

       /  October 14, 2011

      Oh, BJ. I hope the smiles continue for them both and that they can mend their relationship and that she can get out of that relationship. What a good aunt you are–it’s always good to have somebody to go to when you can’t or don’t want to go to mama.

      • BJonthegrid

         /  October 14, 2011

        I think they will. It’s a horrible phase my niece is going through “you’re old enough to make decisions but not wise enough to understand the consequences”.

        • corkingiron

           /  October 14, 2011

          So sorry for your niece – and ditto to the others who support the important place of loving adults like you in their lives. Some days, they just break our hearts. She’s lucky to have you in her life.

          • BJonthegrid

             /  October 14, 2011

            Thank you. I’m a better parent and aunt because of you guys.

      • SWNC

         /  October 14, 2011

        “What a good aunt you are–it’s always good to have somebody to go to when you can’t or don’t want to go to mama.”

        Amen. I went through a long period in my adolescence when I was much closer to my aunt than my mom. A big part of the reason why we live where we do is that I really want my kid to grow up around her aunts and uncles and grandparents. I think it’s incredibly important for kids and teenagers to have in their lives adults who are not their parents but who still love them unconditionally.

    • dmf

       /  October 14, 2011

      she is lucky to have such support, I used to do some work with a women’s health clinic and the girls&women who didn’t have people around to talk such things thru with were often weighed down in ways they didn’t even fully understand.
      are you in NY, the wegmans ref. made me wonder?

      • BJonthegrid

         /  October 14, 2011

        Virginia. I really don’t know how I managed before Wegmans. Actually I do. We ate out all the time! Ha

    • SWNC

       /  October 14, 2011

      Oh, your poor niece. That’s some rough stuff to go through. She’s lucky to have you and her mom in her corner.

    • Adolescence? Pah. It’s the early 20’s that are ‘orrible.

      Although, as I said to a friend of mine who is th parent of 2 teenage boys, good judgement is what you get with experience, and experience is what you get with bad judgement. So.

      Hope the process isn’t too painful

      • BJonthegrid

         /  October 14, 2011

        I agree. I have boys, one turns 13 this summer. If I can get them to 25, I think common sense will kick in and I’ll be set!

    • helensprogeny

       /  October 14, 2011

      COMFORT and HUGS buttons clicked for all involved. And LUCK button very much clicked for your niece. Life is just hard sometimes.

    • Sorn

       /  October 14, 2011

      I’m really sorry to hear about your neice having a miscarriage. Growing up is hard, and it’s a wonder any of us make it to 25 still living.

      On a brighter note, she has a loving family, and eventually will rise from the I’m old enough to make my own decisions (which are usually bad choices), to the I’m never going to be too young to ask for advice stage. I wish you and her mom the best, and I hope that you all still have hair left at the end of everything.

      • BJonthegrid

         /  October 14, 2011

        You are a sweetie. I hope my little men are as thoughtful as you.

        • Sorn

           /  October 14, 2011

          Thank you very much. I hope they have an easier time at things.🙂

    • I am so very sorry for all the pain. I hope – well, I hope everyone gets the comfort they need.

      So sorry for this.

  22. Right! I’m off to the Brownies meeting (though I have caved and am changing my clothes…. “Kill” might be rather a strong verb for a room full of 8 year olds, on second or third thought).

    I’ll be back later. Don’t forget to recycle those pop cans!

    xo

    • corkingiron

       /  October 14, 2011

      So now I have this mental picture of a Brownie knocking on my door and saying “I could kill you with my brain…or you could buy a box of these here cookies. What’s it gonna be?”

  23. helensprogeny

     /  October 14, 2011

    So, Tucson Horders! I don’t know if you even exist (though I know there are lurkers at TNC’s and at least one other commenter, though I haven’t seen him in awhile). But if you do and if you’re here and if you’d like to meet and greet at the Occupy Tucson event tomorrow in Armory Park, let me know. I’d love to say hello. I have to work tomorrow afternoon, but I”m planning to be there in the morning, probably around 10-ish.

    • i would make the drive over from phoenix and join, but i have blown most of my traveling budget this past week and can’t afford another tank of gas until my next paycheck comes in.

      metaphorically pillage a few things for me, will ya?

      • helensprogeny

         /  October 14, 2011

        Done. Though I’ll miss the chance to shake your hand in person. Some other rally perhaps. You do know there’s an Occupy Phoenix tomorrow too, don’t you? (Just in case you’re interested in the rally thing.)

    • [delurking] that’s good to know. we’ll be occupied by 6YOs tomorrow, but if there’s one Occupy Tucson, there’ll be another … [/delurking]

      • helensprogeny

         /  October 15, 2011

        Another Tucson Horder! Yay!!!! I feel so lonely out on these threads, the lone voice for our fair city. Good to know you’re out there. I sometimes feel as though I’m the only person in Tucson who knows about and reads TNC (let alone our lovely current hostess). I urge you to jump in and join the conversation more often. Lurking is all well and good. Swimming in these waters is an experience not to be missed. And yeah, there will be other Occupy Tucson events, no doubt. Have fun with the 6YOs!

  24. efgoldman

     /  October 14, 2011

    On Monday we are finally going to inter my mom’s ashes.
    She died on my daughter’s 30th birthday, 2/23 of this year, at 93. She had a good run, and just wore out.
    We had the memorial about a month later. We could not put her in the (long-since-purchased) grave next to my dad, because this particular Orthodox Jewish cemetery doesn’t accept cremains.
    She didn’t believe in any kind of afterlife; I’m an atheist, so I certainly don’t either. So the fact that the box of ashes was in the house didn’t bother me much. mrs efgoldman, however, is a recovering Catholic/now Episcopalean; she believes what she believes, and wasn’t real happy about it.
    In the time between graduating nursing school in 1938 or ’39, and marrying my dad in December 1941, mom was an army nurse. The times being what they were, she was forced out of the army for being married. So my brother was able to get the army to locate her discharge papers, which made her eligible for space in the military cemetery in Bourne MA.
    I don’t feel particularly sad about any of this, but as always since I discovered TNC’s OTANs, posting about some life event or other helps me order my thoughts. Thanks for listening.

  25. And today, of course, I forgot my contacts. So I’ve been squinting most of the day, and blinking.

    On the plus side, it’s cold and grey and drizzly, so what am I missing by not seeing anything?

    If you’re on I-5 going south in the next 30 minutes, that’s me using the dots separating the lanes as a sort-of guide. I’ll have my flashers on and I’ll drive really slowly just so we’re all safe.

    • On the plus side – Free Food at Work! Some big event just occurred – I don’t even know what it is – and they have lots of leftovers. I just scored some wonderful stuff for a late lunch.

    • Aaaand suddenly I’m glad for the distance between Chicago and Seattle.

      • Or Portland and Seattle, for that matter.

        • I fit right in in Ballard.

          • God I miss Almost Live.

            Not to mention, why haven’t full DVDs been put out yet? This is a wasted opportunity!

            • Yes. I miss that show. I remember (crankypants here) when it was live.

              When we did the rollout of Windows 95/Office 95, they were part of the “show” on campus. (The central soccer field was turned into a giant carnival show. They were some of the cast members, and I remember most how wonderfully spontaneous they were. Either they are fantastic trained actors who really work their jobs, or they had somehow been working in tandem with us for a year to get that kind of insight.

              Of course, Jay Leno was the MoC that day. I got to see him riding around on the Mousemobile, and my reaction wasn’t “That’s JAY LENO!” but “That’s Jay Leno RIDING A MOUSE WITHOUT A CORD ATTACHMENT!”

              • Speaking of Microsoft, as I posted on FB last night while taking an Almost Live nostalgia trip, nerds have come a long way:

  26. Emily, could you take this down? Not a good idea on my part.

  27. Ian

     /  October 14, 2011

    Crap. Our half inch of snow is melting.

    • My understanding is that you can expect to get some more.

      • Ian

         /  October 14, 2011

        That’s the sad thing. We get very little precipitation in Fairbanks. Nothing melts between late October and maybe mid-March, but it comes down just a little at a time. The last two years, the trails didn’t start to get good until December-January. My wife was still running the dogs on the road in November. If it’s going to be below freezing, I want some damned snow!

        • The more you know! Typical Midwesterner, I just assume that the farther north you go, the more snow you’re likely to get.

          I really need to learn more about the states I’ve never been in!

          • Ian

             /  October 14, 2011

            We’re in weird bowl that doesn’t get much precipitation. A stagnant air mass comes along with that, which means two things. First, we get no wind, which makes the cold bearable. The flip side is that our air quality is terrible. You don’t think of dangerous air when you think of Alaska, but we’re in violation of EPA standards. We have till 2014 to find a solution or the feds will step in.

            Other parts of Alaska will get as much snow in a night as we get all year. We have seismic stations where the solar panels get crushed by the snow load.

  28. The Larch. The… Larch.

    And now… The Horse Chestnut!

    • helensprogeny

       /  October 14, 2011

      Oh, LIKED!

      And now for something completely different.

  29. Please stand by for a demonstration of relevance.

    And then the internet fell on his head.

    Man, I do love the Bloggess.

    Also: Teddy bears are awesome. (The source of the base image is actually here, but it comes without the framing, which adds a lot.)

    I post this kind of stuff regularly on my LJ/DW, which is linked in my profile.

  30. Things I like about this OTAN at Emily’s…

    Tucson
    Airplane
    Fairbanks
    cremains (wondering where Mom’s are, cuz I don’t have ’em — truth)
    anything mentioning chocolate

    Listening to a mashup of a big band with Jump Around on French radio — I WANT THIS SONG!

  31. wearyvoter

     /  October 15, 2011

    Happy Saturday if anyone is around.

    I’m taking this opportunity to be a happy Spartan and cheer w/o gloating (because gloating is unbecoming and unsportsmanlike)today’s win over the Wolverines.

    Many years, I comfort myself with the idea that the marching band is consistently good. The football team on the other hand, tends to be uppy-downy in its performance.

    Thank you for your indulgence.

    • How can you gloat? That is so cruel.

      Well, at least they were undefeated for a while…

      Good lord, 14-28 by MSU. The humiliation. After the blowout over Minnesota, too.

      Going outside now to scrape off the bumpersticker.

      • wearyvoter

         /  October 16, 2011

        It wasn’t so much a gloat as a relieved very large smile.

        I’ve taken to following the games on espn.com or the app that sends periodic score updates to my iPod touch. If I pay attention to the Spartans in real time, they tend to sense this and proceed to disappoint me.

        The Wolverines will recover from yesterday And they will probably take it out on Nebraska and on Ohio State. (In particular, I hope they cream Ohio State. Long story involving grudges carried over from the 1970s.)

        There are so many years when I stay in the corner and bring up–with a weak smile– the cheery news that the Spartan marching band is awesome, even when the football team is not so much. Like in times past when Central Michigan University defeated the Spartans two years in a row. It will happen again.

        • When I was growing up, UMich was a fierce name and memory. Then lately – pfft. Wha happen? This year has been good, though.

  32. Some pix for you – taken on my walk today during my lunch hour.

    http://s1142.photobucket.com/albums/n619/stephenmatlock/Neighborhood/