Alterna-Open Thread again.

Update: Needless to say, this is open to everyone, not just regular TNC commenters – come one, come all!

Ta-Nehisi has come to the not at all unreasonable conclusion that when he’s off-line, it’s best to not leave Open Threads lying about unattended. So, if I understand correctly: None today, none tomorrow.

I, however, am not off-line! And I understand how weird it can be to have the Gone Fishin’ sign suddenly appear on your usual hangout. So as I did once before, I’m setting up an Open Thread here for any and all who might want to chat.

A few words before take-off:

  1. Let’s adopt TNC’s rules – no bashing of his fellow Atlantic bloggers please, except within the confines of what he finds acceptable at his place. No bashing of each other (like we’re bashable! Pleeeease!), and no arguing into the margins, literal or figurative.
  2. Let’s adopt my rules, too! – these can be seen here (and are always available up there on the right, in “About Commenting”), but they boil down to: Be a person.
  3. There’s no need to fear: I may look sweet, but I have a ban hammer and I’m not afraid to use it – should any unpleasantness occur, I can, and already have in the past, called motherfuckers on their shit. Pinky swear!
  4. If you’re not a regular reader of Ta-Nehisi Coates’s blog, you should be! His is one of the best blogs on the planet, because he is thoughtful, smart, funny, and very passionate. It’s never the same thing twice, but it’s always interesting. Here’s another link, and it’s always and forever on the Smart People blog roll, to the right.

Note to new commenters/old hands commenting from a new or different email address: All first comments require my moderation. If you’ve commented and it hasn’t appeared yet, no panicking! I’ll get to it as quickly as I can.

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130 Comments

  1. I really had no idea when I first said, “Hey, let’s have a DC meet-up!” that I’d suddenly find myself in charge of planning an Event for up to 40 people, hahahahahahahahaha *falls over*

    Glad to hear it went well for the NYC and Chicago branches of the Horde, though. That gives me hope…

    Also we are on track to go pick up the new kitty at 5:00. Eeeeeeeeeee! He’s my first pet and I’m excited.

    (I think husband is also excited. I found last night that he had used the new litter scoop to write “CAT” in the new litter box. I queried if he was expecting the cat to need it labeled, and if he would like to go write “HUMANS” on our toilet. He got a gleam in his eye and asked if we had dry-erase markers. Happily, we do not.)

    • I know, I loved that you were all “uh, sure, I can do this… right. I can do this, right?” — and it became a small wedding!

      I organized what wound up being 7 people. Much, much more manageable.

      (Also: Cats/Humans – HA! I love your husband now, too!).

      • Luckily, I’ve planned a small wedding. 😉

        When I was all, “Ugh I suck at event planning” my dad was reminding me, “Uh, you got married? In 2009? Threw a huge party and did 100% of the planning yourself and everyone liked it?”

        He raised a fair point. And I suspect the Horde will be mainly self-entertaining. 😉

        • JHarper2

           /  February 22, 2011

          Re: The Horde will be largely self-entertaining”. Yup, we’re like cats that way. Feed us, rub our bellies and mark our litter boxes, and we will have hours of fun with yarn.
          Husband and Father both sound pretty cool.

    • k___bee

       /  February 22, 2011

      Have you thought up some kitty names yet? I still can’t get over how cute that cat is!

      • Husband is leaning toward “Nimbus” due to his coloring, with Loki and Marley on the “maybe” list. Me, I feel like that kitty has to have an X or K sound in his name somewhere.

        I have a feeling that no matter what we name him, he’ll mainly be called Cat, Silly Cat, Strange Cat, and Damn Cat.

        • enstar

           /  February 22, 2011

          “nimbus” is very difficult to yell. it gets all mushy. “loki” and “marley”, on the other hand, have my full stamps of approval.

      • Anibundel

         /  February 22, 2011

        It doesn’t matter what you name them. They will tell you their names as you live with them. I may tell you my five are Ani, Drake, Kira, Mitzi and Luci, but in reality their names are Pip, Boo, Screech, Staypuff and Your Highness.

      • @ anibundel

        FIVE?! faints dead away

      • Anibundel

         /  February 22, 2011

        @Emily: seven litter boxes, five cats, four cat trees, three floors, two humans, one happy family, zero college educations to save for.

        • (My opinion might be different if I had actually liked my cat. Who lived with me for sixteen years. Love her? Yes. Like her? Not much. Some creatures are annoying, and it’s not their fault. They are just as God made them).

    • helensprogeny

       /  February 22, 2011

      Yea, kitties!! As to the name, my cat was officially Roberta but was called some variation of Pookie, Love Cat, Pea Pod, Podlet, Pod Cat, Treasure Kitty…you get the idea. When you fall in love with a cat, the names of endearment are endless. I hope you love having a kitty. They really are fabulous beings, hairballs and all.

    • Anibundel

       /  February 22, 2011

      40??!! PEOPLE??!!

      faints dead away

      • @ anibundel
        You can handle it. I promise, I really do.

      • 40 is unlikely. I’ve been wavering between 25 and 30 for the restaurant headcount.

        We got 21 definite “yes” replies, and 13 variations on “maybe.” Of the 21 definite yes-es, at least two are bringing their spouses / partners. But then of course there’s the typical attrition with an event…

    • wearyvoter

       /  February 22, 2011

      Fluffball should be home soon?

      • Yes. 🙂

        He mewed a little plaintively in the carrier in the car, but was mostly a very good boy. We’re acclimating him in the guest room / office… when we brought the carrier in there, he crawled right out and onto my lap and wound around both of us. And also sneezed on me.

        He’s been in the office since and appears to be adapting remarkably well for a little guy who’s had so much stress. He’s only 7 lbs and was just neutered yesterday, plus the car and all today, but he’s used the litter box twice and been drinking water and had some food.

        Also, as a little 7 lb kitty, he’s discovered hidey-holes even we never thought of. And we thought of a lot of them. He’s sleeping in the bottom corner of the Expedit shelf, behind the futon, now. 🙂

        • wearyvoter

           /  February 22, 2011

          That’s great. Sounds like he’s adopting you right off the bat. Cats are really good at hiding in places where you would never think they’d fit. 🙂

  2. Anibundel

     /  February 22, 2011

    Yay! Today in three year olds, we sang “Horrible Horrible Haman” and learned the value of sharing the fish with our friends.

  3. BJonthegrid

     /  February 22, 2011

    Thanks Emily! I am still at home with cooties. Gaddafi was entertaining in that as long as he was talking, he wasn’t able to give orders to kill the innocent.

  4. carlos the dwarf

     /  February 22, 2011

    Thanks for organizing this! Special election around here today, so I’m off to make some phone calls for the Democrats. Talk to you all later/tomorrow!

  5. BJonthegrid

     /  February 22, 2011

    I have always thought that one of the tenants to good citizenship is being aware of what is going on around you. This global warming business! I am not a scientist but all these 100 yr floods and massive Earthquakes make me feel like I should be doing something. Two years ago my neighborhood was struck by a tornado and took out ten homes and damaged 100 homes (Thank God No injuries)…..and this was in Virginia! Of course you probably missed it because within a week, the massive Earthquake in China happened and killed 100,000 people.

    I don’t know if I should turn off the TV and cross my fingers, but I don’t want to wake up one day and Hawaii is gone, especially since I gotten there yet.

    • My greatest problem is that other than not use plastic bags and walk whenever I can (etc) – what else can I do? I have a limited number of hours, and the extra ones I get tend to go to one cause…and I think a piece of me also is not altogether sure she wants to think about it too much….

  6. BTW – I discovered yesterday that a (male) blogger had written a post stating that I (specifically) and other women bloggers have been “raping” Lara Logan is using her assault as an opportunity to write about… rape.

    It was perhaps my biggest life lesson ever in Do Not Feed the Trolls.

    (PS One of my readers sent me her own story, of a date rape, and agreed to let me post it. Scroll down, or click here)

    • That may have been the impetus for TNC’s decision not to host an OTAN while he’s gone.

      • Trolls? Or his own Lara Logan post?

        It sounded like it might have been the Logan post(his reference to “safe space”,”therapy”) – but as I understand it, there was a lot of ugly getting worked out in the Vick threads. At the top of one, he wrote that he can’t help but wonder if some of the folks who have emailed him re: Vick “have been abused.”

        I admit to not wanting to believe that he’s sorry that he provided the space for what became such a beautiful thread with his post on the Logan story….

        • devin

           /  February 22, 2011

          Yeah that post of his.. it sounded like he doesn’t want it to be a space where people are able to be comfortable with their ideas, because the conversation should challenge them on an ongoing basis. Which is fine. But dude, look at the Logan thread. How could anyone not want that sort of conversation to take place?

        • k___bee

           /  February 22, 2011

          Yeah, I personally think it had to do with the Vick threads not the Logan thread.

          HOWEVER it’s possible that it’s simply fucking intimidating to have people you’ve known online as your commenters for years, feeling so comfortable around your place that they are willing to talk about their experiences with rape, sexual assault, coercion, etc. in the detailed way many did on the Logan thread. It was amazing. But it’s also pretty intense to facilitate that kind of conversation, too.

          • BJonthegrid

             /  February 22, 2011

            I felt that too. It’s funny, we also talk about sex and race in the Civil War Thread but It felt different in the Logan/Vick threads. I am not worried about TNC feelings, but I wonder how he felt.

            • I got this sense that it wasn’t just comments, but emails.

              And we all know there’s the possibility they were threatening, which isn’t just TNC, then, but others. Better, being away, to let things simmer down.

              But I have to say; left me feeling as if I’d done something wrong. Damned, but I’m gonna get over that good-girl impulse before I die!

          • anibundel

             /  February 22, 2011

            I’m actually pretty sure it was the Vick threads. I went back and re-scrolled through them and noticed a couple of stories in each about people with their animals that someone might have considered an “overshare.” The Logan thread was one thing (though I will admit, I steered pretty well clear of it, as I was not sure I could handle what was obviously coming out)–it’s another for people to keep on sharing once the threads have moved on.

        • I was thinking of the troll on the OTAN.

          • The OTAN got trolled? Huh, guess I missed it. Good thing, too.

          • anibundel

             /  February 22, 2011

            OTAN got trolled? How do I miss these things?

          • Alright, maybe it wasn’t the OTAN. But there was some troll yesterday, right?

            • anibundel

               /  February 22, 2011

              There are always Trolls. But they don’t usually come bother us in the OTAN. “OTAN” doesn’t pop up on their controversial subject to piss people off about radar.

      • CitizenE

         /  February 22, 2011

        I think his closing comment last night covered his rationale. His name is on the site and he feels responsible for its upkeep, and rightly so. He trusts the Horde, but in the end, down there on the bottom line, everyone but him gets to go home.

    • devin

       /  February 22, 2011

      What. What. What the crap is the matter with people.

      I’m glad you all are still writing things on the internet, otherwise I think I might just assume that everyone in the world was now insane, and never leave my apartment again on that assumption.

  7. enstar

     /  February 22, 2011

    apologies for the length, but i really enjoyed reading this with my students today:

    (2) Just as one should choose inexpensive food over expensive food, and food that is easy to obtain over food that is hard to obtain, one should choose food suitable for a human being over food that isn’t. And what is suitable for us is food from things which the earth produces: the various grains and other plants can nourish a human being quite well. Also nourishing is food from domestic animals which we don’t slaughter. The most suitable of these foods, though, are the ones we can eat without cooking: fruits in season, certain vegetables, milk, cheese, and honeycombs. These foods are also the easiest to obtain. Even those foods that require cooking, including grains and some vegetables, are not unsuitable; all are proper food for a human being.

    (3) He argued that a meat-based diet was too crude for humans and more suitable for wild beasts. He said that it was too heavy and that it impeded mental activity. The fumes which come from it, he said, are too smoky and darken the soul. For this reason, those who eat lots of meat seem slow-witted. Since of all creatures on earth, the human being is the most closely related to the gods, he must be nourished like the gods. The vapors coming from the earth and water are enough for them: what we must do, he said, is get food like that—the lightest and most pure food. If we do this, our soul would be both pure and dry, and being such, it would be best and wisest—so Heraclitus thought when he said, “A dry beam of light is the wisest and best soul.”

    (4) He added that when it comes to our food, we are worse than brute animals. Although they are pulled by violent desire to their food as if driven by a whip, they at least do not go to extremes and fuss about it: they are satisfied with what falls to their lot and they seek fullness only, nothing more. We humans, however, think up all sorts of devices and tricks to embellish the presentation of our food and to better amuse our palate. We have become so greedy and particular about our cuisine that, just as there are books on music and medicine, people have written books about cooking—books which will greatly increase our gastronomic pleasure, even as they ruin our health.

    from Musonius Rufus: Lectures and Sayings (Cynthia King, 2011)

    books on COOKING? the horror!

    • CitizenE

       /  February 22, 2011

      “Food is truth.” Dogen

      Though some aver the apex of civilization is the hunter-gatherer band, so-called Western civilization and the Hopi, among others, point in their histories and foundation stories to agriculture being the foundation of culture, taking humanity from the underground of conscious experience into the light of day.

      Food like music are both described by their flavor.

  8. helensprogeny

     /  February 22, 2011

    ee, you are the very best! Thank you for this thread. I go into withdrawal if I don’t have my OTAN fix daily. Love your place, by the way. Thanks for making room for the Commie Horde on your couch.

    • BJonthegrid

       /  February 22, 2011

      Awesome!

    • How interesting that as Ms. Giffords recovers, Beck has become Dorian Gray?

      Palin is looking increasingly lifeless, too.

    • devin

       /  February 22, 2011

      “Kelly has a twin brother, Scott, who coincidentally also had a birthday yesterday.”

      What?

      But yeah, that is seriously miraculous.

  9. Be a person Well, that’s exclusionary!

    **********************************************

    Today is give-some-love-to-Tennessee day.

    Rikyrah posted a map at jackandjill politics yesterday showing that Tennessee is the only former Confederate state to mandate collective bargaining by law.

    Five other states in the old south have banned collective bargaining.

    Compared to Wisconsin, Tennessee is lookin’ progressive.

    • HA! Yes. Yes it is. (“it” is exclusionary and “Tennessee” is lookin’ progressive)

    • SWNC

       /  February 22, 2011

      “Down there where there’s alligators, you won’t find no cheaper labor! Look away, look away, look away Dixieland!”

  10. Emily Hauser

    “Commie of the day”

    Thanks!

    • (But I like your hat better).

    • dave in texas

       /  February 22, 2011

      There’s a guy at the gym I go to (well, the one I went to until the legislative session started, anyway) that looks like the twin of your Disqus avatar. Even the hat he always wears looks like yours.

      • Maybe it’s the ghost of my kinsman Aaron Perry, of the 8th Texas House. Tell him I have some questions for him.

  11. **************PLEASE NOTE**************

    It just finally occurred to me to check if I could switch the order of comments (older -> younger) and add nesting levels. AND I CAN. So I did.

    Carry on.

    • anibundel

       /  February 22, 2011

      Nesting. It makes the comment thread sound so homey…

    • Thank you, Emily, for the kind invitation; I’m sorry I wasn’t home; out with my knitting circle, working and talking.

      If you’d been there, I’d have made you a cup of herbal tea. Since you’re here, please accept
      /virtual peach tea with maple syrup (they go nicely together).

      It’s sugar season; the saps beginning to run, the sugar houses are firing up their evaporators and tapping their sugar bushes, and pretty soon, we’ll all be sticky!

      • wearyvoter

         /  February 22, 2011

        Like, like, like. (That sounds amazingly good. Our temperatures are back in the 20s today.)

  12. CitizenE

     /  February 22, 2011

    Thanks for the invite, Emily. Today is a paper grading day–ah, soon enough I will be quit of being this messenger to young people that they need to really examine the details of their experience, observation, and study to learn from the writing experience and write better. Anyway, lately I have been thinking of Robinson Jeffers, his deeply ingrained cynicism with humanity, his allegiance to the natural world. Even for me, reading him is strong medicine to swallow, not always palatable, yet I do love his audacity, letting the chips fall where they may–so my contribution for today here is this from the Korean War era:

    De Rerum Virtute

    I.

    Here is the skull of a man: a man’s thoughts and emotions
    Have moved under the thin bone vault like clouds
    Under the blue one: love and desire and pain,
    Thunderclouds of wrath and white gales of fear
    Have hung inside here: and sometimes the curious desire of knowing
    Values and purpose and the causes of things
    Has coasted like a little observer air-plane over the images
    That filled this mind: it never discovered much,
    And now all’s empty, a bone bubble, a blown-out eggshell.

    II.

    That’s what it’s like: for the egg too has a mind,
    Doing what our able chemists will never do,
    Building the body of a hatchling, choosing among the proteins:
    These for the young wing-muscles, these for the great
    Crystalline eyes, these for the flighty nerves and brain:
    Choosing and forming: a limited but superhuman intelligence,
    Prophetic of the future and aware of the past:
    The hawk’s egg will make a hawk, and the serpent’s
    A gliding serpent: but each with a little difference
    From its ancestors—and slowly, if it works, the race
    Forms a new race: that also is a part of the plan
    Within the egg. I believe the first living cell
    Had echoes of the future in it, and felt
    Direction and the great animals, the deep green forest
    And whale’s-track sea; I believe this globed earth
    Not all by chance and fortune brings forth her broods,
    But feels and chooses. And the Galaxy, the firewheel
    On which we are pinned, the whirlwind of stars in which our sun is one dust-grain, one electron, this giant atom of the universe
    Is not blind force, but fulfils its life and intends its courses. “All things are full of God.
    Winter and summer, day and night, war and peace are God.”

    III.

    Thus the thing stands; the labor and the games go on—
    What for? What for? —Am I a God that I should know?
    Men live in peace and happiness; men live in horror
    And die howling. Do you think the blithe sun
    Is ignorant that black waste and beggarly blindness trail him like hounds,
    And will have him at last? He will be strangled
    Among his dead satellites, remembering magnificence.

    IV.

    I stand on the cliff at Sovranes creek-mouth.
    Westward beyond the raging water and the bent shoulder of the world
    The bitter futile war in Korea proceeds, like an idiot
    Prophesying. It is too hot in mind
    For anyone, except God perhaps, to see beauty in it. Indeed it is hard to see beauty
    In any of the acts of man: but that means the acts of a sick microbe
    On a satellite of a dust-grain twirled in a whirlwind
    In the world of stars ….
    Something perhaps may come of him; in any event
    He can’t last long. —Well: I am short of patience
    Since my wife died … and this era of spite and hate-filled half-worlds
    Gets to the bone. I believe that man too is beautiful,
    But it is hard to see, and wrapped up in falsehoods. Michael Angelo and the Greek sculptors—
    How they flattered the race! Homer and Shakespeare—
    How they flattered the race!

    V.

    One light is left us: the beauty of things, not men;
    The immense beauty of the world, not the human world.
    Look—and without imagination, desire nor dream—directly
    At the mountains and sea. Are they not beautiful?
    These plunging promontories and flame-shaped peaks
    Stopping the sombre stupendous glory, the storm-fed ocean? Look at the Lobos Rocks off the shore,
    With foam flying at their flanks, and the long sea-lions
    Couching on them. Look at the gulls on the cliff wind,
    And the soaring hawk under the cloud-stream—
    But in the sage-brush desert, all one sun-stricken
    Color of dust, or in the reeking tropical rain-forest,
    Or in the intolerant north and high thrones of ice—is the earth not beautiful?
    Nor the great skies over the earth?
    The beauty of things means virtue and value in them.
    It is in the beholder’s eye, not the world? Certainly.
    It is the human mind’s translation of the transhuman
    Intrinsic glory. It means that the world is sound,
    Whatever the sick microbe does. But he too is part of it.

    Robinson Jeffers

  13. JHarper2

     /  February 22, 2011

    Thank you for hosting this, while the generalissimo is away, but where is the LIKE button? There has to be a LIKE button. How can I give a virtual hug without a LIKE button?

    • enstar

       /  February 22, 2011

      i literally cannot like this comment as much as i want to. 😉

      • enstar

         /  February 22, 2011

        oh gosh. it turns my smileys into actual icons. i feel… so strange.

        • I KNOW! I found the work-around though: a space between the colon & the parenthesis, like so:

          : )

          (in an aside, I can’t believe I use emoticons now. I used to kind of rail against them. Now I’m an emoticon purist. Sheesh!)

          • devin

             /  February 22, 2011

            Or non-traditional ones, like =] and (maybe?) =)

          • wearyvoter

             /  February 22, 2011

            My daughter likes the one that looks like a wince: >.<

      • anibundel

         /  February 22, 2011

        LIKE!

    • CitizenE

       /  February 22, 2011

      ~{|8@)>

    • JHarper2

       /  February 22, 2011

      Also, Emily, thanks for the invite here.
      To all the Lost Battalion who were so kind with their support for my health condition yesterday, thank you. It means a great deal. When Home Care came yesterday to cleanse the wounds and change the dressing, she said the wounds seemed smaller and with less discharge on the dressing. Right now, I will take “seems” when it comes to improvement.

      Last night in hemodialysis.
      I was in a bay with three other patients. Aside from getting hooked up late because of a problem on the previous shift and some difficulty with the connection all went well with me. The three other patients all ran into difficulties and problems. Fortunately the nurses there are extremely professional and competent.

      Sometimes, like last night, I am the Lucky One and it is good to recognize that.

      • You were quite honestly the first person I thought of. I saw that and went: But… but… we all said that we’d keep JHarper2 company…! And now we caaaaaaan’t!

        PS Fingers crossed for further good luck!

  14. Jetamors

     /  February 22, 2011

    New open thread!

    I come bearing bad news, though: Dwayne McDuffie has died.

    • O.o

      NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
      (this is a very serious NO. Not a mocking NO like it’s Luke finding about who his father and sister are, but an honest to God NO of losing a goddamn comic book genius.)

  15. Thanks for hosting the OT at your place! Unfortunately if I had anything I wanted to say, I’ve forgotten it.

  16. thoughts about the crazy world:

    1) Just remember, the uprisings of the Middle East have less to do with Bush the Lesser or his neo-con allies and more to do with some poor guy in Tunisia who wanted to run a fruit stand.

    2) The fight over the unions is NOT over what they get paid or what benefits they receive: the fight is over the unions’ power to do ANYTHING to represent the workers. The fight is over whether or not workers’ unions can exist at all.

    2a) and the workers’ unions are the ONLY ones with any access to political power who are worried about the prolonged, double-digit (it hovers between 9.6 and 12 percent depending on the chart) unemployment.

    3) I love football, but Goddell (sp?) and the owners ought to back off their urge to have 18 games a season. The players are DYING because of their injuries: maybe not right on the field, but the lifespans of our gridiron heroes are shortening into more painful, damaged years… Just get rid of 2 exhibition games you DON’T need, keep the schedule at 16 games, add another bye week to help players recoup, and worry more about lowering ticket and parking costs so fans can afford to attend the games you’ve already got!

    4) I need to finish that short story I’m writing. Deadlines, deadlines…

    • taylor16

       /  February 22, 2011

      Your #2 is exactly what I need to keep in mind when getting into my inevitable Facebook and real-life arguments about this with people I know.

      My own state of Indiana has seen some minor protests the last couple of days over some right-to-work legislation that was due to be discussed in the next couple of days, and today the entire Democratic legislative bloc has gone AWOL. Who knows how long this will last or how big it will get, but something tells me this issue is about to become big in my neck of the woods.

      • I think it’s becoming much, much bigger than the people who wanted to kill the unions thought it would, or wanted it to….

    • Let me expand (1) to say that not only are the revolutions in the Mideast not about George W Bush, they’re just not about the U.S. at all, except in the indirect sense that we established a functioning democracy 200+ years ago and they’re wondering why they can’t do the same.

      This morning I was listening to Pacifica Radio, which I don’t ordinarily do, and the host was talking on the phone with a Libyan-American who was talking about the situation in Libya and had some good information and good perspective. But the interviewee concluded with a plea for Western countries to get involved directly in Libya, and I’m not so sure that would be a good idea. There is of course, a tremendous inclination to want to get involved when we see something going wrong in another country, but getting involved can often lead to outcomes we didn’t think of initially. George W. Bush in Iraq would of course be the #1 example, but beyond that I think that any country who gets involved militarily would see that they’re weakening the homegrown nature of the revolution. I’m not a full isolationist, but let’s just say that we should be very wary of intervening.

  17. taylor16

     /  February 22, 2011

    Heh. I really need to remember that these are over here when TNC closes his place for the day!

    I will be back tomorrow to chat… 🙂

  18. Craig

     /  February 22, 2011

    I could attempt to obey #1 but I would probably fail so I will shut up now.

    • Well, it’s good to know your limitations. (If you manage to control yourself, come back!)

      • Craig

         /  February 22, 2011

        It’s just the first part of the rule that’s difficult to follow. Also, doesn’t seem warranted around here. McMegan is a hack. There, I said it, no takebacks.

        • taylor16

           /  February 22, 2011

          Like like like like like

            • Craig

               /  February 22, 2011

              deleted, because I asked you very nicely not to. Please. If you want to talk about the Atlantic line-up, your best bet is Balloon Juice, a place for which I have great fondness. There is a lot of free and easy complaining even about our own TNC over there

            • taylor16

               /  February 22, 2011

              I’m sorry for playing along. I got carried away in my last 5 minutes at work. I don’t even read the other Atlantic bloggers enough to form much of an opinion. (Okay, other than the Trig thing is a little nuts).

              Anyhoo, I’ll behave from here on out, I promise!

              • Aw, you’re good. I hadn’t made my request for cessation yet when you responded, aside from anything else! I just want to step lightly, if you see what I mean.

                I’m not sure who Craig is. The only other time that handle has appeared here, it was to complain about a different Atlantic blogger during the summer Open Threads (which were, it should be noted, much less active! Wow! But I digress), and Craig seems to have disappeared, since I sent an email repeating my request, and deleted the third comment.

                So. Perhaps BJ has a new commenter tonight!

                • taylor16

                   /  February 22, 2011

                  (I thought he was FuriousGiorge for some reason. Because apparently I have now learned that his name is Craig? But, um, feel free to delete this, because I’m probably wrong.)

                  • I don’t think so! Aside from anything else, the third comment started with the words: “Suck it!” Which I just don’t picture FG saying to me, here. Or anywhere, really, unless we were kidding around, etc, etc, etc… You’ll note I’m not even using pronouns to describe Craig (which, it turns out, is a very difficult way to write…!), in no small part because I have this fantasy that it’s someone from the Atlantic, testing me.

                    Welcome to the fantasy life of a work-at-home writer/geek. I believe I should probably get out more.

                    • Ian

                       /  February 22, 2011

                      Pretty sure Craig is FG. At least, FG is named Craig. And FG and McMegan went mano a mano today in one of the Wisconsin threads. There is my mountain of evidence.

                      Thanks for hosting.

                    • Oh dear. I did know FG’s name before, & I know he’s hardly a fan of Ms. McArdle… Well, I shall do my best to completely ignore this rumor and carry on bravely! (Aside from anything else, the exchange really didn’t strike me as FG-like, neither in tone, nor in vocabulary choice…!)

                    • FuriousGiorge

                       /  February 22, 2011

                      Oh that is appalling. I can’t believe someone would usurp my identity to say such awful, awful things.

                    • Dude – you are killing me here! Actually the “awful, awful” thing was that I asked nicely that someone stop doing something annoying in my house — let’s say: I put up a sign that said “No vuvuzela blowing in my house please,” and dude walks in and blows a vuvuzela. I say “please stop that, I understand the urge to blow your vuvuzela, but it bothers my friend.” To which said person says (and I quote) “Suck it!” and blows his vuvuzela. Is that not rude? I say it is rude. And in my house, if I ask a person to not do a thing — not once, not twice, but thrice, in fact — I would like to believe that guests in my house — even congenitally cranky and/or vuvuzela loving guests — would be polite enough to respect my request.

                      If it turns out that said guest was my friend, in disguise, that would be a disappointment to me. Why? Because I’m normal.

                    • FuriousGiorge

                       /  February 22, 2011

                      What if it was a kickass but slightly discordant harmonica solo? Perhaps the bagpipes are more to your liking? I also play a mean kazoo. I believe in being prepared for maximum annoyance when I visit someone’s house.

                    • FuriousGiorge

                       /  February 22, 2011

                      (Oh Emily, I won’t say mean things about Meggsy in your house any more. And you will tell me how to get one of those fancy avatars that all the kids have.)

                    • Ah-HA!

                      Um… sure! But not right now, as I was literally on my way to bed when a post started writing itself in my head and I decided to write it down for real and that is the only reason I happen to be here to see this…. Tomorrow. Be nice (as you can…) and I will be nice back. Yo. Dap. Exploding fists. Shoulder bump. Peace out!

        • Doooooood – please? The reason it’s warranted is because I’m trying to be respectful of TNC. That’s all. This is meant to be the pre-fab break room just outside his building, but still on the property. If that makes any kind of sense at all. Which it kind of doesn’t, but I had a root canal this morning, so just blame the novocaine.

          • wearyvoter

             /  February 22, 2011

            Or think of it like the no-smoking within 15 feet of the building rule that we have here in Illinois?

            • Sure! Like that! Or… like… not spitting on the sidewalk! A small price to pay for civility in one small place.

      • Craig? who the ‘eff is Craig

        Furious memo: don’t you dare think about retiring FG!

  19. corkingiron

     /  February 22, 2011

    Thanks ee for hosting. Left to my own devices, where will my brain take me? Umm – I think there should be a special circle in Hell for packaging designers…..

  20. Anibundel

     /  February 22, 2011

    There was an earthquake in New Zealand today?
    Is it wrong that my first thought was OMG how will this affect The Hobbit?

    • …ummm… not as bad as me for thinking about and then failing to send an email to my Kiwi friends who live here in the states? (Thankfully, I rectified that before coming here to say this. I’m not THAT bad. Or so I like to think). Dearie me. Really, I think the world needs to just calm the fuck down for a few days.

  21. dmf

     /  February 22, 2011

    who’s been sitting on my couch said grumpy old rocking chair bear…

    • IT’S dmf IN AN OPEN THREAD!!

      Hi dmf!

      • dmf

         /  February 22, 2011

        hi ee, is that you or the pain meds talking? i’m flying in here under the dinner hour cover, how come no thoughts on rahm’s run, seems to have so many of your themes coming together, no?
        http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/20/magazine/20Emanuel-t.html?_r=1&ref=magazine
        ps let citE know that there was a brief pontcharGrl sighting over at Delta Bound with promises of a triumphant if slighty sleep deprived return.

        • Tell CitE yourself, he’s right there, dude! Silly people.

          I find I can’t really think too much about Chicago politics. I don’t live there, so it would be a lot of angst over stuff that certainly has an impact on me and mine, but about which I can do absolutely nothing. Not even, you know, letter writing!

        • CitizenE

           /  February 22, 2011

          d
          sorry I have been so recalcitrant via e; s’my problem, abject lack of consistency, why I don’t have a blog of my own. I do have news for you and some pics, but be patient–changing computers & from pc to mac, so data transfer has been slower than I could have imagined. Hope you and yours are surfacing, you are finding work, especially work that has meaning for you. Thx for P-girl heads up.

    • Someone’s been sitting on my couch and they gobbled the cushions all up.

  22. So for anyone who’s interested I put up a fascinating series of videos on water in the west from the documentary cadilac desert. In so many ways it shows how false this western libertarianism really is. They really are worth watching especially the last one where floyd dominy calls himself a messiah.

    http://sjessen.wordpress.com/2011/02/21/cadillac-desert/

    • I haven’t watched the documentary, but I did read the book in 2009 and was pretty surprised when I read his obituary in April 2010 to learn that Floyd Dominy had been alive at the time that I read the book. He lived to be 100 years old.

      • Fascinating isn’t it? The life of Floyd Domini is the next great western biography that needs to be written.

  23. When I’m tired and thinking cold
    I hide in my music, forget the day
    And dream of a girl I used to know
    I closed my eyes and she slipped away

  24. Pondering one thing: TNC says he’s off to finally write the Malcolm piece for the mag. (Amazed and anxiously awaiting. . .)

    Perhaps he’s feeling it’s a good time to let things simmer down; and a few quiet days on the internets is an eternity of cooling, particularly after the Vick threads of late.

    Just sayin’,

  25. When you are writing seriously it’s very hard to break it off to do something on another topic or in another area. Thus the wisdom of taking a break from the ‘toobes, when you have a shorter piece due on deadline.

    Thanks for explaining what the bad stuff was that happened. I tend to stay more within the confines of historical and overt political subject topics at TNC’s. I was born without the gene ‘interested-in-sports’ so stay away.

    Love, C.