HCR – FTW!

I will post something else later, but the day cannot begin without me first saying:

WHOOOOOOOOO-HOOOOOOOOO!!!

There are all sorts of reasons to not love this bill, there are probably even more reasons to be unhappy about the way it came about.

But it’s a really good start, and it’s just possible that it’s very hard for a democracy to be anything but very, very messy. And last night, America took another step toward becoming a more perfect union, and the arc of the universe bent that much closer to justice.

I only wish that Teddy Kennedy had been here to cast his vote.

4 Comments

  1. carlos the dwarf

     /  March 22, 2010

    Yup, I feel the same way. When I was watching the vote come in, I felt very much like I was watching history being made–I felt the same way when I watched election night coverage in ’08. This is going to be one of those things that I tell my grandkids about in sixty years.

  2. dmf

     /  March 22, 2010

    indeed,read this over @ a. sullie’s thought of you:
    “[O]ne of the things that makes politics hard for rank-and-file voters in the United States is just how impossibly large this nation is. In a country of 300 millions, no matter what you do, it’s often going to feel like it’s a meaningless drop in the ocean. And given the legislative process, time passes between campaigning and enacting bills into law, and by many people have moved on to other parts of their lives. But individuals, and especially small groups of people, really can make a difference. This battle over health care reform is one time when it wasn’t just the lobbyists, or the interest groups, or the politicians…whole bunches of small groups of people, in states and Congressional districts across the nation, turned a handful of Senate races and a dozen or two House races around and, sixteen or so months later, their work is, today, most likely going to change the country. If you’re one of them, it’s a day to be proud of what you’ve done.”

  3. sue swartz

     /  March 22, 2010

    Same reaction here. We actually watched the votes happen – 15 minutes (twice) of background mumblings and numbers moving around a TV screen. Mesmerizing. Who knew?

  4. Cold-eyed takeaway? ‘It’s a start.’

    But on top of this calculation? WIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Ahem.

    (Tucks her shirt back in.)

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