Hordian open thread and wonder works.

It’s yours…. (And remember: It’s Friday, so poetry and music are particularly welcome!)

Standard FYI clause: My rule of thumb is that I wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

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211 Comments

  1. Bookwoman

     /  June 22, 2012
  2. Hooray! Me on couch, football on TV, open thread at emily’s

    **obligatory blog flog is obligatory**

    http://anibundel.wordpress.com/

    today we add Versace and Fendi. also the wizard of oz in china and the Monsters University trailer.

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      I didn’t watch yesterday’s game due to the dr. Is it worth watching the replay? My Czech friend is sad but not distraught.

      • Portugal was always going to beat the czechs without a miracle of some sort

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          Of course. But games can be interesting to watch even if the expected winner ends up winning.

          • It’s not that Germany keeps scoring, it’s that Greece’s goal depreciated.

    • aaron singer

       /  June 22, 2012

      Can’t wait for this game! Hopefully it’s a not a German walkover.

      • koolaide

         /  June 22, 2012

        Oh. Jurgi made some big changes for a quarterfinal game. Interesting.

      • koolaide

         /  June 22, 2012

        Good grief. Samaras acts like he’s getting paid per German ankle he takes out.

        • aaron singer

           /  June 22, 2012

          Germany certainly getting some good chances here in the first 25.

      • David L

         /  June 22, 2012

        Just saw a good name for this game on Twitter: “Game of Loans”

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          I read somewhere that some Greek fans were making tshirts that said “Kick Germany out of the Euro” for this game.

      • Bob Jones' Neighbor

         /  June 22, 2012

        Well, with 25 minutes to go, it’s tied up! 1-1…

        • Bob Jones' Neighbor

           /  June 22, 2012

          And Khedira kicks Germany ahead once again…

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          That didn’t last long…

          • 3-1. Germany ran them over as expected.

            • koolaide

               /  June 22, 2012

              The rout is on now. 4-1.

              • there’s a terrible Grexit from the Euro joke to be made here.

                • koolaide

                   /  June 22, 2012

                  make it when Germany scores again.

                  (yes, I think they’ll score again)

                  • koolaide

                     /  June 22, 2012

                    5 mins left? Looks like I’m wrong. Gomez almost got one but now it looks like Germany has put on the breaks.

                    • That was a total consolation prize goal. Germany gave them a partial bail out so Greece wouldn’t look bad.

                    • koolaide

                       /  June 22, 2012

                      kinda annoyed espn3 cuts the feed as soon as the game ends so we don’t get to see any afterchat. But I should be grateful that a feed is even available to me.

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          Shocking play by the Greek keeper on the Klose goal. Just terrible.

  3. FWIW – On Tuesday evening I gave in to my curiosity & DM-ed TNC re: his thoughts on the Open Thread. He didn’t respond, but as we all know, yesterday there was thread saying he’d been away for too long. I tweeted him after that, and he didn’t respond to that either. And today there’s no thread.

    I give up with the guessing and/or asking and will just go with the flow.

    • He has been quite the chatterbox the last couple days.

      • taylor16

         /  June 22, 2012

        It’s probably a relief to get back to regular blogging after agonizing over a long-form piece for so long.

        I’m not a writer, but I think that a little variety in our work lives is what keeps us moving and motivated.

    • dmf

       /  June 22, 2012

      good for you for trying, even with no reply the effort is a reward of its own, so much wasted time and effort in mind-reading that could be better spent on life as it is

  4. caoil

     /  June 22, 2012

    Soooo…about that river in my backyard…pictures. I hope the album shares properly. If not, I’ll link some of the videos I posted to youtube.

    • caoil

       /  June 22, 2012

      Like this one. I couldn’t zoom in quite enough on the river itself but I think you can see how fast it is.

    • Holy crap, you were not kidding!

      • caoil

         /  June 22, 2012

        And we’re expecting rain today, so that’s fun.

          • caoil

             /  June 22, 2012

            Rain has begun. *sigh*

            • helensprogeny

               /  June 22, 2012

              Sending emergency package of dry, warm air + sunshine to you, with cookies alongside.

              Seriously, got my fingers crossed for you and good thoughts (as opposed to water) flowing your way.

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      yikes! stay safe & good luck :(

    • Bookwoman

       /  June 22, 2012

      Oh dear. Is the water still rising?

      • caoil

         /  June 22, 2012

        Tide will go out a bit today, and then tonight when the tide comes in it will be at its peak. So I expect a leetle more sloshy water in the yard tomorrow morning. If all the weather upstream behaves, maybe we won’t have too much more of this.

    • watson42

       /  June 22, 2012

      Yikes. Water seeping past sandbags is Not Good.

  5. Sorn

     /  June 22, 2012

    On tuesday I got to see Elliot West give a talk at my Alma Mater. It was ever bit as amazing as his books. Also Foner Came yesterday. I feel like Emily there is not time to read all of the things.

    • Sorn

       /  June 22, 2012

      I mean my copy of reconstruction arrived in the mail. Damn those mislaced modifiers. I need to write more.

  6. Today driving to work, I passed a vehicle with a magnet on the back. Said magnet read as follows: “I (heart) My Guide Dog”

    I’m still pondering that one.

    • efgoldman

       /  June 22, 2012

      My landlord once posted a “dogs keep off” sign in the front yard. maybe its the same exceptionally bright dog.

    • JHarper2

       /  June 22, 2012

      One yip for brake, two for go, three for left, four yips for right?

    • helensprogeny

       /  June 22, 2012

      I saw one in the Trader Joe’s parking lot this morning that said “Dogs against Romney”, which make me LOL.

      • Heh, that’s a full-blown organization. They even have anti-Romney protests.

        • efgoldman

           /  June 22, 2012

          I’d send ‘em a couple milkbones.

  7. Not poetry or song, just the face I came home to:

    • helensprogeny

       /  June 22, 2012

      That is not a happy face. Did you ply it with treats?

      • David L

         /  June 22, 2012

        I’m sure he had big plans for the afternoon, none of which included having to make sure a human wasn’t looking.

        • helensprogeny

           /  June 22, 2012

          No doubt!
          How did your kitty (Nelson?) take his time in the closet? Or is he still imprisoned there?

          • David L

             /  June 22, 2012

            Newman survived without any obvious ill effects, except that he ignored me when I got home instead of issuing his usual demands for affection. He’s back in today, as they gave us a two-day window (which is another gripe I had about this whole thing) and didn’t get to my apartment yesterday.

            • helensprogeny

               /  June 22, 2012

              Oh, no! Poor kitty. I hope you’re giving him extra treats and love for his troubles.

      • No. I went upstairs and changed out of my work clothes. When I came back down, she stood up and hopped off the couch with a look that said “I wouldn’t deign to share with you.”
        HisCat. She really hates me.

    • efgoldman

       /  June 22, 2012

      Are you Guybrushing this weekend?

  8. dmf

     /  June 22, 2012

    When I am among the trees,
    especially the willows and the honey locust,
    equally the beech, the oaks and the pines,
    they give off such hints of gladness.
    I would almost say that they save me, and daily.

    I am so distant from the hope of myself,
    in which I have goodness, and discernment,
    and never hurry through the world
    but walk slowly, and bow often.

    Around me the trees stir in their leaves
    and call out, “Stay awhile.”
    The light flows from their branches.

    And they call again, “It’s simple,” they say,
    “and you too have come
    into the world to do this, to go easy, to be filled
    with light, and to shine.”

    -Mary Oliver

  9. ok fine, song then.

    • aaron singer

       /  June 22, 2012

      One of the band members is a co-owner in a couple trendy U St. bars in DC.

  10. snailspace

     /  June 22, 2012

    Love and Work

    In an uncurtained room across the way
    a woman in a tight dress paints her lips
    a deeper red, and sizes up her hips
    for signs of ounces gained since yesterday.

    She has a thoughtful and a clever face,
    but she is also smart enough to know
    the truth: however large the brain may grow,
    the lashes and the earrings must keep pace.

    Although I’ve spread my books in front of me
    with a majestic air of I’ll show her,
    I’m much less confident than I’d prefer,
    and now I’ve started pacing nervously.

    I’m poring over theorems, tomes and tracts.
    I’m getting ready for a heavy date
    by staying up ridiculously late.
    But a small voice advises, Face the facts:

    go on this way and you’ll soon come to harm.
    The world’s most famous scholars wander down
    the most appalling alleyways in town,
    a blond and busty airhead on each arm.

    There is an inner motor known as lust
    that makes a man of learning walk a mile
    to gratify his raging senses, while
    the woman he can talk to gathers dust.

    A chilling vision of the years ahead
    invades my thoughts and widens like a stain:
    a barren dance card and a teeming brain,
    a crowded bookcase and an empty bed…

    what if I compromised? I’d stay up late
    to hone my elocutionary skills,
    and at the crack of dawn I’d swallow pills
    to calm my temper and control my weight,

    but I just can’t. Romantics, so far gone
    they think their lovers live for wisdom, woo
    by growing wiser; when I think of you
    I find the nearest lamp and turn it on.

    Great gods of longing, watch me as I work,
    and if I sprout a martyr’s smarmy grin
    please find some violent way to do me in;
    I’m burning all these candles not to shirk

    a night of passion, but to give that night
    a richly textured backdrop when it comes.
    The girl who gets up from her desk and dumbs
    her discourse down has never seen the flight

    of wide-eyed starlings from their shabby cage;
    the fool whose love is truest is the one
    who knows a lover’s work is never done.
    I’ll call you when I’ve finished one more page.

    –Rachel Wetzsteon

  11. snailspace

     /  June 22, 2012

    Apologies for the very long post!

  12. chingona

     /  June 22, 2012

    How do I get the videos to embed? Last time, I went to youtube, got the embed code and pasted it here. That did not work.

  13. I will once again bang the Bobby Womack’s new album is the awesomest drum loudly

  14. David L

     /  June 22, 2012

    A rather underreported story from yesterday:

    There was almost a man on the USA’s women’s Olympic track and field team. Keelin Godsey was born a woman and came out as trans in 2005, but remains female for purposes of sports competition, since he has not yet started the physical transition. Yesterday, at the Olympic trials, he needed to be in the top three in the hammer throw to make the team. He briefly was in the top three, but got pipped by two other competitors on the second-to-last throw and missed the top three by about a foot.

    Godsey had been waiting until after this summer to transition because doing so will effectively end his career. He doesn’t have the sheer size to compete on the men’s side of the sport.

    This adds a different dimension to all of the standard questions about gender: Is it your body or your mind? Should it be different when you’re competing in physical competition?

    More about trans athletes from Sports Illustrated here, including Kye Allums, a transman who played women’s basketball because of NCAA rules: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1198744/index.htm

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      thank you for the link. It’ll take a while for me to read through it (work, soccer, horde posting) but the first page was compeling…

  15. wearyvoter

     /  June 22, 2012

    Worked from home this morning (got on at 7:30); logged off at 12:30. Tomorrow is car hunting day. Wish us luck. We’re borrowing a Prius Zipcar tomorrow to get to the lots, so when we pull up in a Prius we’ll probably throw off at least one salesperson. :) (Rule 1: Fend off the service manager because the Prius is Not Ours to Trade.)

  16. dmf

     /  June 22, 2012

    • I need to get this album on CD now that I don’t have a tape player — I was just enjoying De La Soul is Dead the other day. It helps that I’m a big fan of the Avalanches, but I find this kind of hip hop extremely easy to get into, as someone that listens to a bit of indie rock and sample-heavy electronica (IE the Avalanches).

      • Have you ever listened to The Books? They take the sampling ethos of The Avalanches and apply it to found sounds.

        • They’re pretty good. My roommate has Thought for Food on vinyl, though we both prefer the singles on the Lemon of Pink.

  17. so i am stunned to discover that Zicam works exactly as advertised on TV. I took it in the first 30 minutes of being sick and have dodged the worst of the flu. R meanwhile is running on redbull and dayquil and generally looks like hell.
    Drake’s determination to get some of R’s chicken soup before this illness is over is admirable, but so far ultimately futile.

  18. MightBeLying

     /  June 22, 2012

    It just took me half an hour to find the laundry in my new place. It is FAR away and involves 4 flights of stairs each way. Also it is like 95 degrees outside.

    If I didn’t need clean clothes for a wedding tomorrow, I definitely would have decided clean laundry is overrated.

    Can I justify outsourcing laundry?

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      Depends on how much it costs, I guess. When I was in grad school and didn’t have a washer/dryer in my apt, I looked at what a laundry service cost. The laundry mat nearest to me w/ “we’ll do it for you” service cost too much for me to justify on my grad student noincome. But I didn’t have to deal w/ 4 flights of stairs.

      • MightBeLying

         /  June 22, 2012

        I was also on the 3rd floor with laundry in the basement in my last place, but the added bonus of having to go outside and walk around the building to literally the farthest part of the complex from my place might push me over the edge. I am going to see how much wash and dry service is, since the laundry here isn’t free even once I get to it!

    • efgoldman

       /  June 22, 2012

      We actually have our own machines in our own basement, but the cellar stairs are so steep and scary (especially since the stroke) that I occasionally go up the street and throw quarters in the machines.
      Or short answer: yes.

    • watson42

       /  June 22, 2012

      It’s actually pretty common for people in the Boston area to outsource their laundry. Many apratment buildings don’t have laundry on site. Most people I know who rent outsource their laundry. Just consider it part of the New England experience. :)

      • efgoldman

         /  June 22, 2012

        …people in the Boston area….
        :::ahem:::
        Providence =/= the Boston area.

        • MightBeLying

           /  June 22, 2012

          As I was quick to point out to a friend who asked if I’d come pick him up at Logan tomorrow ;)

          • efgoldman

             /  June 22, 2012

            Well, I pick up the kids at Logan, because it gets them here two hours faster than if they take the train down, especially on a weekend.
            Although I start twenty minutes closer than you do; I basically roll out of my driveway on to 295.

            • MightBeLying

               /  June 22, 2012

              I know it’s not too far, I was just realllllly not interested in making that drive this weekend. I am a nervous driver and I’m slowly getting used to the area. I miss the Philadelphia grid system!

        • watson42

           /  June 22, 2012

          I know, I’m just saying that at least around here it’s common, in case MightBeLying needs some additional rationalization to outsourcing laundry. Plus when I moved here and was perplexed by the lack of widespread laundry facilities, I was told it was how people did it here in New England.

          Though this thread reminds of when my brother thought picking him up at SJO was going to be easy since it’s so close to Oakland (where I was living)….at rush hour no less. :)

      • MightBeLying

         /  June 22, 2012

        … I know this is confirmation bias but this sounds like solid reasoning to me! :)

    • MightBeLying

       /  June 22, 2012

      An update: I would like a sticker, or a cookie. I did ALL the laundry. I did ALL
      the chores. I was a good grownup, and sticker charts are wasted on the young.

      • efgoldman

         /  June 22, 2012

        Patience, Grasshopper. We will have cookies, and so will you.

        • MightBeLying

           /  June 22, 2012

          Hooray for auxiliary parents!
          (Also: What can I bring?)

  19. efgoldman

     /  June 22, 2012

    FURIOUS CRAIG BAIT!

    http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2012/06/21/judge-websites-subject-equal-access-laws/fxo3sy5Z52OsgSLSptuNHL/story.html

    (If you get paywalled, let me know and I’ll copy-paste the whole thing.)

    • JHarper2

       /  June 22, 2012

      This is good news. Even though the ruling is not a final decision it allows the lawsuit to proceed

      From the story.

      “Online is a place,” said Wendy Parmet, professor of law at Northeastern University and a specialist on disability law. “Virtual spaces are spaces.”

      This I take to be a very important point. If people are blocked out of online they are effectively blocked out of so much of society.
      As was ruled before: separate is not equal.

  20. watson42

     /  June 22, 2012

    So….I’m supposed to start a job on Monday. It’s a contract position, 4-6 months at a large biotech/small pharma company. I can’t tell you how happy I am that I will actually be earning money again, at least for a while.

    I will continue to look for something permanent, since the company has been pretty clear that this position is for a very specifc and time-limited function. But even on that end, things are picking up. I won’t celebrate until I am told all the paperwork has gone through (there have been several snafus on their end in that regard). Time to buy some booze! :)

    • watson42

       /  June 22, 2012

      On a related note: I had to agree to background checks, legal history check (to see if I had ever been involved in a civil or criminal case, in any capacity), a credit check and a drug screen as part of all this. I’m sorry, but wtf? I can understand verifying my employment history and checking to see if I have a criminal record but anything else? I don’t believe that what one does with their personal time/money has anything to do with how they do their jobs.

      not to mention: I am one of the long term unemployed. I’m lucky that I have savings and am able to maintain good credit. But what if I weren’t and fell behind on bills because I had no income? what if I had been a complaintant in a discrimination case (for instance, if I had reported any one of many potential employers for their biased/ racist hiring practices as I was job hunting)? Would I then be permanently unemployed?

      • koolaide

         /  June 22, 2012

        The credit check to get a job is one of the most ridiculous and terrible recent develpments in employment/hiring. horrible misuse of credit ratings.

      • chingona

         /  June 22, 2012

        This has become increasingly common and I think it’s really bullshit and disturbing.

        • aaron singer

           /  June 22, 2012

          I (think I) have bad credit, and have applied to I don’t know how many jobs in the last 19 months, having been out of work since Nov 2010. That bad credit I am sure has hindered me getting a job, but I have absolutely no way of knowing that (do I have to agree to a credit check, or can they do that on their own?). I have had plenty of interviews, but nary an offer yet.

          • chingona

             /  June 22, 2012

            Usually they only do them on candidates they are considering seriously. So if you didn’t get an interview, they probably didn’t do a credit check.

            • aaron singer

               /  June 22, 2012

              After an initial interview and before a 2nd? And would I know it if they did one then?

              • chingona

                 /  June 22, 2012

                I think it usually is done when you get a job offer – around the same time they’d do the drug test – with the offer contingent on having a satisfactory result. And I think – but I’m not at all sure – that you would need to consent or sign something.

          • watson42

             /  June 22, 2012

            I don’t know if an employer needs consent or not, but I assume they would. I have an acquaintance who works in HR and I will ask and report back if I get a response.

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      (since you’re not celebrating yet…) A tentative YAY for the potential new job :)

      I wish I could figure out a way to start a company and help unemployed folks get jobs. But I don’t see how I could do that.

    • Yay for a job! Yay for booze! Boo on silly checks.

      My best guess is that with the economy the way it is, employers are looking for any mechanism that allows them to cut down the pool of applicants without having to use human judgement. It is absurd to go for anything but criminal background checks, but that’s the way of things.

    • taylor16

       /  June 22, 2012

      Congrats on the new job!! Of course, a contract for 4-6 months isn’t ideal. But I guess … 4 to 6 months of employment is better than 0 months of employment?

      Words cannot even describe how much I hate credit checks as employment screenings.

    • Dex

       /  June 22, 2012

      Congratulations! I’m sure you’ll knock their socks off. Hopefully you’ll enjoy it and your awesomeness will lead to a permanent post!

  21. aaron singer

     /  June 22, 2012

    Library & Information Science: The worst master’s for jobs?

    http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/library-information-science-ranked-worst-masters-degree-for-jobs_b53165

    Interesting, but from what I gather they looked at salary, not levels of employment in the field. I also saw a story today that only 55% of 2011 law school graduates are employed as lawyers now. 25% are either un- or under-employed.

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      I take all those “worst degrees” articles w/ large grains of salt. So many of the articles seem to consider the wrong sort of things.

    • efgoldman

       /  June 22, 2012

      I also saw a story today that only 55% of 2011 law school graduates are employed as lawyers now. 25% are either un- or under-employed.
      Farley and Lemieux over at LGM have been flogging this for years. They have very unkind things to say about law schools.

      • One of my friends was a math/econ major in college. She did some analyses showing that going to anything other than the top couple of tiers of law schools has a negative ROI. And even those top tiers don’t guarantee anything these days.

        • aaron singer

           /  June 22, 2012

          I have a number of college friends who went to law school, some because that’s what they wanted to do and knew it, others because they thought it was an option until they knew what they wanted to do.

          One of my best friends was a DOJ paralegal for 3 years, just graduated from U of C(hicago) Law, and she still had plenty of trouble finding a job. She got a one-year fellowship at a housing law firm in San Francisco. She said that her school often employs recent grads as researchers or whatever for a year to game their employment numbers into being better than they actually are. So even at the top it can be a tough slog.

          Even at 28 I may be struggling and I don’t know what route or industry to go in, but I know one thing for sure: law school ain’t it.

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          A friend of mine just graduated from law school (2nd career b/c she wants to be a lawyer) and continues to be amazed that law school didn’t teach her what is necessary to know to pass the bar. There’s a whole ‘nother class for that.

          • Bookwoman

             /  June 22, 2012

            Nor does it teach you what you need to know to practice law, at least according to my husband. That’s why it’s so useful to be work as a paralegal for a couple of years before actually going to law school – you learn what actually goes on in a law firm and see how the sausage is made, so to speak.

            • I feel the same way about graduate school in the sciences. It’s a good idea to work as a research tech for a few years before going to grad school because it lets you know whether or not you like the physical process of doing science. There’s a big gulf between that and just learning about science in the classroom.

            • cofax

               /  June 22, 2012

              Your husband is right. Law school is a good education in critical thinking, writing, and research; but it’s not a particularly good job-training program. And I wish law schools would acknowledge that not everyone is going to be a practicing attorney, and invest some of their career center time in developing other kinds of options they can direct their graduates to.

              I fell into non-practicing work, but I did it all on my own without the support of my career services office. It would have been nice to get some backup.

    • dmf

       /  June 22, 2012

      the tragic economics of libraries aside, those are odd programs as the pull is towards technology but that changes so quickly and there really isn’t a core of theory so what is the field to be mastered?
      the whole law school fiasco is a serious scam that shows how the market-driven have taken over most of higher-ed, that and what is a business undergrad degree a degree in exactly?

      • aaron singer

         /  June 22, 2012

        Having once been in interested in journalism, I look at J-school degrees in a similar manner. My alma mater had a small (but good) journalism program, but they made those students major in something else as their approach was that journalism is a craft, not a field of study.

        As to your second point, UVA is the best current example of that, although there are unfortunately quite many. It’s not just higher-ed, either. My mom just retired from Chicago Public Schools, and privatization is taking over elementary ed in many ways, too.

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          privatization is taking over elementary ed in many ways, too.

          You ain’t lying, friend. I despair for the future b/c of the dismantling of free public education for all going on right now. For profits in the public school charter system siphoning off desperately needed public school funds is but one way. sigh.

          • aaron singer

             /  June 22, 2012

            It’s not just that, either. After-school programs run by the likes of Kaplan that do a very mediocre but get huge contracts from school districts; so-called parent organizations that are run by “reformers” (Stand for Children or similar orgs.) that are another union-breaking tool; professional development companies that don’t really teach anything but offer required PD, etc.

            • koolaide

               /  June 22, 2012

              Definitely. And the various online ed programs that are for profit that school contract w/. My sister teaches and what she has to deal w/…sigh.

              Like I said, what’s going on in public education makes me dispair about our future and about children. And so few people are paying attention to what’s going on.

      • taylor16

         /  June 22, 2012

        “the whole law school fiasco is a serious scam that shows how the market-driven have taken over most of higher-ed,”

        This is becoming evident in a lot of traditional Ph.D.-granting programs (that are supposed to lead to professorships) as well.

        Higher ed enrollments are exploding, but instead of filling those classes with tenure-track profs, colleges are hiring adjuncts or temporary faculty to fill gaps without making long-term financial commitments. Meanwhile, they keep bringing in full classes of new Ph.D. students to fill (again, cheap and temporary) teaching slots and (in some cases) to bring in tuition dollars and grant money. Then they spit them out onto the academic job market, where there aren’t nearly enough tenure-track jobs to go around.

        I’ve never seen good numbers on how many Ph.D. grads (especially in the humanities and social sciences) are un- or under-employed, but based on what I’ve read and the stories I’ve heard, it’s a significant proportion of them.

        The movement toward running universities like businesses is going to have a lot of really significant negative ramifications, IMHO.

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          This.

          And, imo, it already has had s significant negative impact.

        • dmf

           /  June 22, 2012

          yes but I have to say that the previous model of higher-ed wasn’t so good to start with, by and large there was little to no thought/effort given to student learning and or looking at how classwork did or did not translate to life after graduation and a lot of unsubstantiated talk about “critical” thinking and such.
          plus most undergrad degrees, esp. social sciences and humanities, where/are really just prep for grad school but how many folks take such paths and to what ends?

          • taylor16

             /  June 22, 2012

            Meh. I don’t think higher ed has to be a job-prep factory. I double-majored in two social sciences AND went most of the way through a Ph.D. program, and now I manage insurance billing and general financials for two physician practices with annual billings in the tens of millions of dollars.

            The accounting stuff is always a little bit challenging, but every day I see how my wishy-washy social science degrees help me be excellent at my job – through being able to do things like think critically, problem-solve, see the big picture, etc. I really balk at the idea that my degrees were just grad-school prep that gave me no value. If they are for others, it’s because no one shows those students how their degrees can translate into the real world. But it’s not because the degrees are worthless.

            • dmf

               /  June 22, 2012

              can you say more about how you got these skills thru your education and have you seen the related testing on graduating students?

              • taylor16

                 /  June 22, 2012

                Well, I’ll be honest … I don’t think I can tell you “oh, assignment X led me to be able to do task Y in my job.” But can anyone? My husband was an entrepreneurship major in the business school in college and now works at a small business doing all budgeting, marketing, etc. He says that in his opinion, his business degree taught him almost nothing useful for his job.

                I will say that I think that school tasks that involved being forced to write coherently, to meld together arguments from different sources into a coherent narrative, and to see the “whole picture” of a situation helped me a lot in my job … which involves a lot of problem-solving, arguing persuasively in writing, and communicating and strategizing with our clients over the phone.

                As for grad school in particular … the time I spent writing and delivering presentations in the classroom, at conferences, etc., has left me as the lead trainer and meeting organizer at our office. When my boss is pitching her services to a new client, I organize the presentation and sit in to answer questions on my feet. It’s not altogether unlike being in front of a classroom.

                Does that answer your question? I’m not sure it does.

                • dmf

                   /  June 22, 2012

                  I don’t think that melding arguments (or cutting&pasting as most undergrads do) easily translates into seeing the whole picture in off the page circumstances in large part b/c was has to create the ‘frames’ for oneself and have many differing kinds of skills to get the ‘data’. I can see how
                  managing a classroom is like other kinds of management
                  but did you get much training/supervision and did the content of your coursework help here? I think that you may be giving too much credit to the system and not enuff to your own abilities, by and large undergrads are testing terribly on related tests/tasks in their senior years and beyond.
                  yes as I mentioned I’m not sure what an undergrad degree in business is about except an indirect lesson in the powers of marketing.

                  • dmf

                     /  June 22, 2012

                    sorry “b/c one (not was) has to create my connection is on the blink

              • mythopoeia

                 /  June 22, 2012

                My classics degree (focusing on language/literature/translation work, rather than civilization history) has trained me very well for the office jobs I have had since graduation, actually. Classes every semester for years in translating Latin and Greek forced me to be excellent at paying attention to hundreds of tiny details as a matter of routine while still focusing on the overall sense of the larger picture.

            • koolaide

               /  June 22, 2012

              Agreed. And I’ll double down and say that not only do I not think higher ed has to be a job-prep factory, I don’t think it should be one.

    • Librarians have the worst average starting salary for the level of education (Masters) required for most jobs. It was that way back in 1992 and it’s obviously still a problem today.

      Thing is, most of us don’t go into librarianship for the money. If we wanted the money, we’d have gone evil and gotten MBAs instead.

  22. Neocortex

     /  June 22, 2012

    Just over a month ago I was a medic for the NATO Summit protests in Chicago.

    I feel so emotionally detached from the experience, it’s creeping me out. I cry at everything, why not this? I’ve told people stories from it several times, and I don’t feel some big wave of emotion when I talk…just sometimes it’s like there’s a block between my brain and my mouth and it takes physical effort to get the words out, but I’m not feeling emotion at the time, just a sense of difficulty. I’ve had (lots of) dreams about it, so I guess the emotion is somewhere.

    On the other hand, I looked up Chicago on Google Maps and used Street View and my text message records to find the intersection (Michigan and Cermack) where police attacked the big march, and the alley and tiny park that we used as triage sites, and that actually did (unexpectedly) almost make me cry. And I get upset by loud noises, and full of rage when people try to justify police brutality. But regarding the events themselves, and thinking about them, it’s like I stuck my emotions in a box somewhere and can’t find them most of the time. I tend to be cut off from emotions when trying to operate in high-stress situations, but normally they come back (quite dramatically) afterward, so I am puzzled.

    Has anyone else had this happen? It’s not that I would rather be a crying wreck than functional, it’s just that I’ve not had this happen before and it’s creepy.

    • dmf

       /  June 22, 2012

      too much exposure can lead down this path, but hard to generalize, I would be more worried if you had shut-down across the board.
      if we don’t take care of ourselves we aren’t much use in the care of others so pls be kind to yourself and respect those “inner” limits, these are multi-generational wars that you are in and the long view needs attention and planning.

    • watson42

       /  June 22, 2012

      I’ve had this happen after some seriously traumatic experiences. My armchair diagnosis of myself was mild PTSD. From what you’re decribing, it sounds like something similar. I’m not qualified to give advice, but I found the most effective thing for me was to give myself some time to process and not get hung up on responding “appropriately”.

      • Neocortex

         /  June 22, 2012

        Yeah, I’ve wondered about mild PTSD – I have some of the risk factors for it (preexisting anxiety disorder, dissociation during the experiences themselves – I’ve come to realize that’s probably what my highly-useful “calmness” during such situations is – and that sort of thing). It just seems silly though, on my part. I wasn’t one of the people who got beaten. I wasn’t one of the eyewitnesses to the protester getting run down by the police van (though I wasn’t very far away and saw it come out of the crowd). The house where I was staying didn’t get raided, and I didn’t get arrested or detained and interrogated. A whole lot of people there had it worse…so what’s my problem?

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          A whole lot of people there had it worse…so what’s my problem?
          Just because women in X country can’t drive isn’t a reason for women in the USA to not fight for equality issues in the USA. Similarly, you need to care for yourself–witnessing trauma (and witnessing trauma to folks you know) and being part of a group caring for people who have been traumatized is, in fact, experiencing trauma. Even if their pain is greater physically, that does not negate your pain.

          If you can get some help now, please consider it. At the very least do some serious self care (relaxation & breathing exercises, journalism, healthy sleep/food/exercise, etc) until your better insurance kicks in. And definitely use the counseling service at your school in the fall. Some schools offer free counseling services for students (my former institution did).

          Good luck take care of yourself so you can continue to care for others. I might be coming across as too stern or something and I don’t mean to. As a member of the Horde community, I want you to be safe, healthy, and happy as possible.

          • Neocortex

             /  June 22, 2012

            Nah, you don’t sound too stern. It’s validating to hear. And medics as a group suck at self-care – I know I do – so the reminder is good. You’re right, of course, in your first paragraph, it’s just hard to internalize when it’s a personal situation.

            The school counseling is free if I pay the health center usage fee (which is on top of the health insurance premiums, and is optional). I should find out if my funding package covers it, as it does my health insurance premiums. If not, there’s no shortage of non-school-affiliated mental health professionals around here, but it would be a lot more convenient to have one nearby.

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      Are you able to get mental heath care somewhere? Quality counseling somewhere? Because (no mental health professional here but…) it sounds like you’re having if not ptsd then definitely other mental health problems related to your experiences as a medic w/ the various protests. Please get mental healthcare (if at all possible, maybe a free/low cost clinic near you?). You’d get a broken bone cared for so please get your mental health cared for.

      In order to care for others as a medic, you need to care for yourself.

      • Neocortex

         /  June 22, 2012

        I do have decent health insurance, but I’ll actually have much better insurance when I start my PhD program in the fall – the student insurance at my university is REALLY good. And I could possibly get counseling at the center there, which would be convenient. So I’ve been thinking about going for that for a while, if for no other reason than to have somebody to talk to about this stuff other than my poor husband whom I rant to too much and my friends for whom I’m talking about something alien to them. But it’s not until September and maybe I should get something sooner than that. Lord knows that if I asked my friends for therapist recommendations I’d be bombarded with them (I’m lucky to be in circles where people are very candid about mental illness).

        • MightBeLying

           /  June 22, 2012

          I’d say it depends on how you feel waiting until September. Is your response bothering you? From your description, it sounds like it could go either way – it’s consistent with PTSD, but it is also a normal reaction to a trauma and you might just be feeling weird that you’re not responding how you’re “supposed” to/how is normal for you. Do you journal? One of the effective therapies for PTSD involves writing out a “trauma narrative” repeatedly – doing some journaling on your own might help you work out your thoughts related to what happened and help you work through your response to it.

  23. I don’t know how I feel about this yet: http://unfaircampaign.org/

    I’m at work and can’t dig in like I want to, but I am very curious to know if anyone here knows more about it or can give their impressions

    • stephen matlock

       /  June 22, 2012

      Wow. This has me interested and yet I’m not sure what it will actually do. The target audience for this seems to be split into the sympathetic and the mildly interested. I’d guess that the mildly interested would be put off by the destruction of their faces and a laden expression of “white privilege.” It might be accurate, but it doesn’t (to my mind) attract interest. (Boy, I’m not saying change the message, but it doesn’t lead to someone wanting to investigate it for themselves as “I might be someone enjoying my white privilege.”)

      This tertiary confrontation regarding racism is something I’m leaning more and more to getting engaged in within a social setting. It’s one thing to hold these values and to promulgate them; it’s another to get engaged in a point-to-point situation. I’m thinking of the people I hang with–most of them are in the “but I don’t feel this way” type of thinking. I’d like to see them explore their own thoughts and feelings in a safe and directed atmosphere so they can take the next steps.

      Things might come to a head in a few weeks. We’ll see & I’ll let you know.

  24. Bookwoman

     /  June 22, 2012
  25. chingona

     /  June 22, 2012

    Takes some real cojones for Romney to tell Hispanic elected officials that Obama should have passed the Dream Act, when he has promised to veto it.

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      But totally within his etch-a-sktch history & approach to campaigning.

    • cofax

       /  June 22, 2012

      Especially when Obama tried to get the act passed, and it was the Republicans who killed it in Congress.

      • helensprogeny

         /  June 22, 2012

        Why are the Dems not loudly beating this drum? (If they are, I haven’t heard it.)

        • koolaide

           /  June 22, 2012

          They’re gearing up. The POTUS today

          • helensprogeny

             /  June 22, 2012

            Heh, I just saw this about 3 minutes ago. I think I just get frustrated because it feels like so often Dems allow the GOP to frame the issues and to make all the noise. (The ACA leaps to mind.) So much of what Obama has tried to do has in fact simply been stymied by the GOP Congress, and it feels like that reality gets lost a lot.

    • Romney will accuse Obama of anything. The theory is, “always attack”. Even when the evidence says otherwise. Simply because he can exist within a media bubble that never calls him on it.

  26. efgoldman

     /  June 22, 2012

    Off home. Stopping at Ron the Barber on the way. We don’t have a Hair Cuttery, not that I’d go…

    • helensprogeny

       /  June 22, 2012

      I’m going to go meet Ron Barber, tomorrow at his first official Congress on Your Corner as our newly elected representative. Considering the last Congress on Your Corner he attended was the one he got shot at, I think it takes a certain courage to continue the tradition of meeting openly with one’s constituents.

      • efgoldman

         /  June 22, 2012

        Ron the Barber isn’t running for anything(*). He’s an old Francophone from Woonseckett who’s been cutting hair in the same place for going on 40 years.
        (*)He may have run for city council or school committee, decades ago..

        • helensprogeny

           /  June 22, 2012

          I am unlikely to be getting a haircut at the gathering, so I guess that all works out! :)

  27. dmf

     /  June 22, 2012

    many good author interviews at:

    http://www.edrants.com/segundo/guests-a-z/

  28. Music, huh?

    There’s a song being played on my local station by a new band, Dry the River. The song is called ‘New Ceremony’. One of the lyrics is “The angel of death came down/and crept into your bed’. This is notable because the first couple times I heard it, I thought the lyric was “The angel of death came on and crapped in your bed.” I’ve heard lyrics wrong before but this is a new record for me.

    • Mira

       /  June 22, 2012

      I’m in a library, procrastinating obviously, and that almost made me laughout loud.

  29. Neocortex

     /  June 22, 2012

    I am confused. I tried to post my comment above with my usual email address, and WordPress asked me to log in, which I don’t remember it ever doing before. Log in? To what? I just fill in my pseudonym and email; that’s how I’ve always commented here as far as I remember. So I used another email address, and now I am stuck in moderation. I haven’t been around much over the last month – did something change?

    • No idea – this has happened to others as well, and I have absolutely no idea why. However, I think that now that I’ve approved you again, you’ll be good until the WP elves get restive again.

      • Neocortex

         /  June 22, 2012

        I’m on my home computer now instead of my work one, and the WP elves still want me to log in when I use my standard email address, but they don’t bother me if I use the alternate one, now that you’ve approved it.

    • efgoldman

       /  June 22, 2012

      It happened to me when started logging in to two computers (work and home) on the same day. If you switch computers, it nukes the cookie for the first one.

  30. chingona

     /  June 22, 2012

    We’ve had Townes Van Zandt on very heavy rotation in our house lately. Hopefully this sounds better to you than it does in my headphones. EVERYTHING is sounding like crap through them today, so I’ll have have to have faith that I’m not giving you a really poor quality recording.

    • aaron singer

       /  June 22, 2012

      I’ve loved this song ever since I was a kid on road trips with my dad, he had a Willie Nelson cd with his duet with Merle Haggard. And I first heard of Townes quite a few years later.

      • chingona

         /  June 22, 2012

        We just got turned on to him recently, and I definitely have a “HOW DID I NOT KNOW ABOUT THIS???” feeling.

        • aaron singer

           /  June 22, 2012

          You a Steve Earle fan? He named his son after him, and Justin Townes Earle is now a good musician on his own, more bluesy than his father or namesake.

          I recommend Heartworn Highways, a mid-70s documentary on the music scene at the time in Austin; the filmmaker traveled to Townes’ trailer home in Texas, Steve Earle suggested it to him thinking that Van Zandt would thrown him out of the place and run him off as he supposedly hated the attention. Instead, they ended with a lengthy conversation, on and off film. Earle’s version of that story is quite funny. There was also a good 2004 doc on Townes’ life, Be Here To Love Me.

          • Justin’s newest record is really good. And almost gospel-y/down-by-the-river-ish.

    • JHarper2

       /  June 22, 2012

      I so love this song. I have about 7 versions bookmarked on youtube and about 4 on my ipod.
      Another Townes, Tecumseh Valley

  31. As mentioned elsewhere, David Blankenhorn just “came out” in favor of same sex marriage.

    Holy crap.

    • chingona

       /  June 22, 2012

      Wait. What? Isn’t that guy like a professional marriage-opposer?

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      Interestingly, he and some other person at his institute wrote an op-ed in an NC paper against NC’s ammendment 1. said it went too far.

    • cofax

       /  June 22, 2012

      I just read that piece! Amazing!

      Of course, he had to know he hadn’t a leg to stand on: his “testimony” in the Prop 8 trial was a classic own-goal. But I’m impressed all the same: not everyone has the intellectual integrity to recognize that at least some of what he believed was wrong.

    • JHarper2

       /  June 22, 2012

      I’m cynical on Fridays. I suspect the change in societal views on marriage equality was cutting into his fundraising for his Marriage Institute. Good to change the public stance though, shows that things are moving in a good direction.
      I know that I can’t know what is in his heart, or his reasons, and I’m not usually this sour and cynical, but today I am.

    • stephen matlock

       /  June 22, 2012

      Holy cow. I’m ahead of the curve on something.

      (It’s always about me, you know.)

  32. 3pm. Guess I’d better drop off my suits at the dry cleaners.

    Why does this matter? Well, I love clothes, but I’m kind of lazy. I’d rather knit. :-D

  33. dmf

     /  June 22, 2012

    they are still finishing condos in my apt building and I’m guessing by the lovely smell/taste and my pounding headache that someone is sealing a wood floor with polyurethane, there ought to be a law…

    • A few weeks ago the climbing gym I go to regularly was starting some construction. Instead of shutting down the gym, they tried to ventilate the place while epoxy or some other industrial-grade adhesive was curing. The entire place reeked. One of the other climbers there that evening remarked “it feels like getting high in middle school”. I tried to get in some climbing, but only lasted about 30 minutes before I had to leave. It was bad enough that I felt like I probably should have waited a while longer outside before getting into my car to drive home.

      • dmf

         /  June 22, 2012

        yes, buckling knees and spinning heads are not so good for climbing or driving

  34. CitizenE

     /  June 22, 2012

    ‘Drink my soul, as if with a straw’

    Drink my soul, as if with a straw
    I know it’s bitter, intoxicating taste.
    I won’t disturb the torment with pleading,
    Oh, for weeks now I’ve been at peace.

    Tell me, when you’re done. No sadness,
    That my soul’s no more of this world.
    I’ll walk down that road nearby
    And see how children play.

    The gooseberries are in flower,
    And they’re carting bricks by the fence,
    Who are you, my brother, my lover,
    I don’t know now, or need to know.

    How bright it is here, and bare,
    My body, tired, rests…
    The passers-by thinking vaguely:
    Yes, she was widowed yesterday.

    Anna Akhmatova, trans. A.S. Kline

    • dmf

       /  June 22, 2012

      To obtain everything by divine sufficiency —
      Holiday eves, permissions, useful tips,
      Life’s beautiful things —
      Talent, virtue, impunity,
      The inclination to see others home,
      The status of traveler,
      The convenience of boarding early so as to get a seat,
      And something’s always missing, a glass, a breeze, a phrase,
      And the more one invents and enjoys, the more life hurts.
      -Fernando Pessoa

  35. CitizenE

     /  June 22, 2012

  36. New post up about older women and body image: http://emilylhauserinmyhead.wordpress.com/2012/06/22/older-women-and-body-issues/

    I utterly failed to capture the depths of my rage. But it’s sounds pretty mad just the same.

    • wearyvoter

       /  June 22, 2012

      It’s damned hard not to have issues with body image. Look at the grief those two commentators on Fox were spouting about Hillary Clinton looking like she’s not trying anymore, tired, etc. (I’m surprised they didn’t use the word “cankle” anywhere in a sentence.)

      • efgoldman

         /  June 22, 2012

        Diane Sawyer last night had a little squib of a story, with a couple of still pix, the thrust of which was “good for Hillary!”

        • wearyvoter

           /  June 22, 2012

          I’ll have to find the clip.

          Past a certain point, it’s counter productive to try to look like you’re still 25. All the plastic surgery, and all the collagen and botox in the world eventually makes one look like one is trying out for the remake of “Death Becomes Her.”

        • David L

           /  June 22, 2012

          Diane Sawyer

          What on earth would a 60-something TV personality and former beauty queen know about how women’s bodies are judged? She really should leave that kind of thing to the experts.

          • efgoldman

             /  June 22, 2012

            A little overreaction? It was a flyby story, and the conclusion was positive and complimentary.

            • David L

               /  June 22, 2012

              A little overreaction?

              Sarcasm, actually.

            • David L

               /  June 22, 2012

              I almost added a “…like Sean Hannity.” to the end of that Sawyer post, then realized I couldn’t remember for sure whether it was him or someone else at Fox that was involved.

              My point of mentioning her age and experience as a beauty queen and such is just to point out that she has pretty much been in a position where she has been judged by her appearance, fairly or unfairly, for her entire adult life.

              Hillary, for her part, seems to really have let loose with the Secretary of State job the last couple years and decided to have as much fun with it as she can. It’s a side of her that I’m not sure I’ve really seen before. That, not her appearance, is the reason I don’t really believe the gossip that she’s going to run again in 2016.

              • efgoldman

                 /  June 22, 2012

                I doubt she’ll run, 2016 or any other time. She’ll be what? Close to or over 70 by then?
                I am disappointed that it appears she’s going to resign after the election, win or lose. She has been a great sec of state.

  37. R_Bargis

     /  June 22, 2012

    Best job in college? Mine was transcribing a 17th century document an antiques dealer was trying to sell (I’d read every paleography book I could get my hands on and enough 18th century documents to puzzle it out). I took my payment in ambrotypes. Best steady job was working as a housekeeper for a very eccentric old teacher who did things like store his academic journals in his kitchen cabinets (he didn’t cook).

    • efgoldman

       /  June 22, 2012

      If he didn’t cook, why not use that perfectly good shelfspace for something useful? I would.
      On the other hand, I might be eccentric…

    • mythopoeia

       /  June 22, 2012

      Checking page proofs and copyediting indexes at my school’s university press. Seriously.

    • MightBeLying

       /  June 22, 2012

      Live-in nanny. I have 4 younger siblings so I basically got paid to have my regular life, in someone else’s house. And when the parents came home I was off-duty. And they had a pool pass.

  38. dave in texas

     /  June 22, 2012

    Y’all, I can’t decide if I’m incredibly depressed or incredibly furious right now. Or equal parts of both. I had to write a memorial for a 16-year-old boy who had been bullied into committing suicide because he was gay .Now, writing under the imprimatur of a governmental agency often means that I can’t really say what I’d like to say, and boy, is this ever one of those occasions.

    What I had in mind was something along the lines of ‘the failure of society to exhibit even the smallest strands of decency led to the death of this young man with no consequences whatsoever for the perpetrators of this vile act’ and so on. What I went with was ‘_____ was an exemplary young man whose limitless potential was tragically cut short and whose struggle to overcome intolerance and cruelty and find his way in life can serve as a motivation to all people to treat others with dignity and respect.’

    This shit just makes me weep, y’all, really it does.

    • David L

       /  June 22, 2012

      Ugh. I can’t imagine.

    • stephen matlock

       /  June 22, 2012

      Sorry man. You’re doing an awesome thing already.

    • efgoldman

       /  June 22, 2012

      Man, writing eulogies is fking *HARD!* Even without the extra baggage and restriction you dealt with in this case. I’m a good, glib, experienced public speaker; that part was easy, but the writing was the killer. One was for a college mentor (bout twenty years later) and the other was for my mom.

      • dave in texas

         /  June 22, 2012

        I do memorials pretty regularly as a part of my job, which I’m afraid I have to be kind of circumspect about. What I actually do is ghostwrite for others, so I have to bear in mind that what I say is going out with someone else’s name on it and carries at least an implication of state policy.

        I can barely imagine doing one for one of my parents, although I’m pretty sure it will fall to me when the time comes.

        Most of the ones I do don’t bother me that much; they’re largely for people who’ve lived full lives. Some of them, though, are a punch in the gut. All those fallen soldiers during Iraq were hard to do. Young children. This one.

    • Oh, honey. Many hugs to you. I’m so glad that the person doing the writing for this poor young man is compassionate and giving.

    • koolaide

       /  June 22, 2012

      So sorry. Majorly sucks. comfort button click :(

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