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231 Comments

  1. I went outside this morning and stood in the parking lot right next to my apartment and WHOOSH the space shuttle was stuck to a biiiiiiiig airplane and it went by right overhead suuuuuuuuper close. WHOOSH.

    And that is why I am late for school today teacher

    • That is so many kinds of awesome I would have a hard time counting them.

      This is pretty awesome too:

      null

      source: http://yfrog.com/ms446cj

      (I so wish I could have seen it myself!)

    • helensprogeny

       /  April 17, 2012

      Even in flyover country we don’t get flown over like that. Too cool! Long, long ago I worked a job that required me to be at my desk editing by 5am. Fortunately, it was in Florida and every time there was a dawn shuttle launch, the whole office was at the window, following the fireball in the sky as it ascended. A thrill that never got old.

      (Though it was paralyzing in just about every way when the Challenger blew up. Not a fun time.)

      • stephen matlock

         /  April 17, 2012

        When I worked in Bellevue WA the Blue Angels would fly by every year – quite awesome in the office towers.

        Also awesome over the water.

        One year a “Stealth Bomber” flew overhead as I was driving on the freeway. (I forget the moniker; B2 Spirit?). It just about made me drive off the road it was so scary with that jagged wing.

        • David L

           /  April 17, 2012

          I grew up about four miles from an air base that put on an annual show. Somewhere, my parents have a picture of one of the USAF Thunderbirds (their precision-flying unit) flying above the house close enough that the forced perspective makes it look about the same size as our car. (They were not, IIRC, that much bigger than a car in person.)

          • My parents have part ownership of a place on Whidbey Island in Puget Sound. The house is just down the hill from the Navy’s outlying field where they practice touch-and-goes. The planes basically line up with the house as they start turning to catch the runway. When you have 3-6 Navy jets flying only a few hundred feet above you, the novelty wears off pretty quickly.

            • David L

               /  April 17, 2012

              Low-flying fighter jets were pretty common for me during my early childhood. Up until Bergstrom closed, we were under the return leg of the loop that the F-4 squadron would make while practicing touch-and-gos. (Close enough that I remember lying on my back in the yard, looking straight up, and having them cross my field of vision.)

              The novelty of the Thunderbirds was that they would fly around particularly low and with afterburners on, so close above us that we could smell and feel the exhaust.

    • Captain Button

       /  April 17, 2012

      You left out the part about welcoming your alien overlords.

    • mythopoeia

       /  April 17, 2012

      Boy but did the planes take getting used to when I moved to Rosslyn. “WHY IS THAT SO CLOSE?!” heartstoppingly for about six weeks.

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        My husband’s dad lived about a half mile from the runways at the Detroit airport for the first five years we were together.

        Every time we’d be staying there I would bolt upright in bed early in the morning in a blind “HOLY SHIT PLANE CRASH!!!” panic. Husband would roll over and be like “what?? Oh, a plane? Sheesh, it’s no big deal, just go … zzzzzzzzz.”

  2. koolaide

     /  April 17, 2012

    Car shoping. I hates it. Decided on getting a Corolla. Trying to find the specific Corolla amongst all the Corollas is making me want to hide under all the covers. The finding of one w/ a clean history that isn’t priced too high at a dealer w/ a decent rep. Only now to realize that the price isn’t the real price but has haggle room built in. And the “no haggle” places like Carmax have a higher list price but w/ no space to work it down.

    How many miles are too many miles for a 2010? How old is too old for 50k miles?

    le sigh.

    • helensprogeny

       /  April 17, 2012

      How old is too old for 50K miles? I don’t know, but I once bought a 15-year-old pickup truck with only 50K on it and drove it for another 11 years. I finally sold it with over 150K on it and still going strong.

      Car shopping sucks. Good luck, and I hope you find a great one.

      • koolaide

         /  April 17, 2012

        I’m aiming for a car younger than my 1993. theoretically, in teh 2006-2009 range. but a 2010 has popped up in my price range so I’m considering it.

    • aaron singer

       /  April 17, 2012

      I have no answers to your questions.

      But I will likely very soon looking for a used car, as well. I have $7000 from State Farm, as I totalled my car in August 2010 and haven’t had the need to replace it since.

      • koolaide

         /  April 17, 2012

        I have done WAY too much research with few tangible results. Sorta like every single grad school assignment I ever had. (and that, kids is one of several reasons I’m not doing a phd).

        60k in 2 yrs? Priced under “market value” so might be a deal. but that’s a lot o’ miles,

        • taylor16

           /  April 17, 2012

          Hmm. I would be hesitant of 60k after two years. That’s a LOT of driving.

          Although it sort of depends on what kind of driving you do in it. Will it be mainly for just local driving, to and from work and whatnot … or are you planning on taking it on long trips?

          I went for the lower mileage because I was really nervous about the long roadtrips I take. If I was mostly driving around in-town I probably wouldn’t have worried as much about mileage.

          But I’d still be hesitant about 60k in two years. Like I said … I drive quite a lot in comparison to a lot of people I know, and I’ve only put on 45k in three years. That’s a lot of wear on a car.
          But I’d still be hesitant about 60k in two years.

          • koolaide

             /  April 17, 2012

            yeah. the mileage is making me hesitate. the price is good. the car is a 2010. it looked clean inside & out & even under the hood. carfax came back clean. but 60k. in 2 yrs (less really given that it’s only April of 2012) is eye popping. where the hell did they drive the thing?

            So, frustratingly back to square 2.

        • chingona

           /  April 17, 2012

          Average is supposed to be 10K-12K miles per year. I think it’s fine for cars to have less – even a lot less – as long as they were well-maintained. 30K miles a year is a lot, but if you know you’re not going to drive it tons, it might be fine, if it’s still a relatively new car. I’ve never bought a used car that had less than 50K miles on it, and I’ve driven many of them for years and years.

        • dave in texas

           /  April 17, 2012

          Highway driving takes a lot less out of a car than city driving does, so if most of those 60,000 are highway miles, it might not be all that excessive.

          • Yes, exactly. We once bought a used car because it had low milage. It turned out the owner had driven it until it had problems then parked it for several years. Oops, wotta lemon.

            We put about 100k (kilometres) on our next car (a new Saturn) the first 2 years we had it. We drove it for another 12 years after that and just got rid of it this year because it needed another $1200 worth of work and we didn’t think it was worth it now that we are driving much less and have access to another car. It had close to 400k on it and was still ticking along, really.

    • taylor16

       /  April 17, 2012

      When I bought my 2007 car in 2009 (so reasonably comparable to buying a 2010 now?) it had just over 10k miles on it. But that was an unusually low number. Most cars I looked at were at about 25k.

      Today, my car has just over 55k miles on it … but I do think that I drive more than the average person. Not in terms of daily commute, but in terms of 1000-mile roadtrips every month or two as I go back to visit family and friends in Michigan.

      So there is one data point for you, maybe?

      • koolaide

         /  April 17, 2012

        the reply above was meant for you. and no disqus to blame…

    • Can you get the name of the prior owner and google him/her? :-)

  3. JHarper2

     /  April 17, 2012

    For those with cats and who have maybe too much time.
    Stuart McLean classic, toilet training the cat.
    Part 1.

    Part 2.

    Part 3.

  4. Leaving in ten or so to head over to this event we’re doing tonight. Consider yourself flogged of my blog.

    • JHarper2

       /  April 17, 2012

      Re: The Voice post: Singing for our Lives.

  5. taylor16

     /  April 17, 2012

    Is there anyone who’s ever gotten anything useful from online webinars where you are supposed to learn a new software program from sitting passively and watching someone else’s screen while they navigate around the software?

    Because I know I don’t. And yet I’ve been sitting in these seminars ALL FREAKING DAY.

    Thank god for the mini-Horde. I was about to jump out of my office window. Which wouldn’t accomplish much, since I’m on the first floor.

    • caoil

       /  April 17, 2012

      Webinars are dreadful. My dept is being trained-up on Office 2010 prior to it being rolled out across the firm, and they’ve given us a folder full of taped webinars to watch at our leisure. I had to stop after the second one because they’re so. very. boring. and I was starting to pass out at my desk. An hour of hands-on exposure is more useful to me than 10 hours of presentation.

      • koolaide

         /  April 17, 2012

        “An hour of hands-on exposure is more useful to me than 10 hours of presentation.”

        This.

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        Yes, exactly. I found the first, oh, half hour moderately useful … just in terms of getting used to the software interface, etc.

        But we’re now on hour six, and I seriously … I’m just not even attempting to pay attention anymore. At least we’re all in our own offices so I can slack off at will.

        But I’m completely with you – I’ll learn more in a half hour working on the program than I have all day today. I’m sure there are people who learn by watching, but I just … I am not one of them.

        We have to do a few hours of webinars on “our own time” as well. I’m actually looking forward to those, since I can let them run (thus getting credit for “watching them”) while I’m at home reading a book.

  6. aaron singer

     /  April 17, 2012

    I’m watching Kingdom of Heaven: I think I may be one of the few people who liked this movie.

    • JHarper2

       /  April 17, 2012

      I liked it.

    • caoil

       /  April 17, 2012

      You’re not alone! I like it too. The cast is good, the music is excellent, and I am given to understand it’s not horribly far off the real-life events?

      • aaron singer

         /  April 17, 2012

        Yeah, I first watched it in college, in a history seminar on The Crusades. I remember my professor saying it was pretty faithful to history.

      • cofax

         /  April 17, 2012

        Except for the part where Legolas taught the Saracens all about irrigation, which is a classic WTPNIAH* trope. Also I kinda doubt the Queen got it on with some random bastard-born night from the south of France, but I dunno…

        * What These People Need Is a Honky

        • caoil

           /  April 17, 2012

          I readily admit I laughed at your acronym.

        • Yeah. It’s pretty rich for the Crusaders to be giving the Arabs any crap given the ethnoreligious slaughter that occurred when they first took Jerusalem.

          • aaron singer

             /  April 17, 2012

            That’s mentioned later on in the movie, when Saladin offers terms of peace to Balian (Bloom’s character), Balian is taken aback and says something such as “You mean you’re not going to slaughter everyone like we did?”

    • I would tell you how I felt about this movie if I remembered anything at all that happened in it.

      (Okay, I remember one thing. The guy with the weird mask. I don’t really know what his storyline was or even whether he died or whatever. Ed Norton though, so there’s that.)

      • aaron singer

         /  April 17, 2012

        Yeah, King Baldwin IV was a leper.

    • It has its flaws, but with suspension of disbelief it turns into a really great flick. I wish there was more media about the Crusades, because it’s just such a crazy period.

      • aaron singer

         /  April 17, 2012

        I was fascinated studying it for a short couple months. I knew little about it going in.

        At the same I also took a class on Maimonides. That semester had a medieval theme.

  7. JHarper2

     /  April 17, 2012

    I was at the cheap (2nd run) movie theatre the other day. Saw the Sherlock Holmes flick, which was okay at 2nd run prices, but the point of this is the sign outside one of the theatres. In the daytime for movies for mommies it was showing The Muppets, in the evening it was showing This Means War.
    There was not room on the name board for both titles.
    Going by the theatre you would think that this movie was showing:
    Muppets Means War
    I would totally go see that movie, even at first run prices.
    That is all.

  8. carlos the dwarf

     /  April 17, 2012

    You guys, I think I’m going to move to DC. The way I see it, I’ve got a job with no opportunity for advancement in a place that I don’t really want to be. If I’m going to have a dead-end job*, I might as well do that job somewhere I want to be. At this point in my life, that place is DC.

    *Without a degree, it’s essentially impossible to get paid work in the field I want to get into, and I’m not ready to go back to school yet.

    • caoil

       /  April 17, 2012

      What’s the field you’d rather get into?

      • carlos the dwarf

         /  April 17, 2012

        Urban planning/policy. I really love urban planning, especially transportation planning, but I know that jobs are scarce in the field right now, so I’d also like to pick up some training in public policy as well to give myself more career options. I’m not yet sure whether this will end up being one masters’ or two. But, in any case, if you don’t have a degree in the field, getting even an unpaid internship is difficult, and there’s no way I could afford an unpaid internship at any point in the next few years.

        • David L

           /  April 17, 2012

          We need for Oprah to start handing out sugar daddies like she hands out cars.

          • koolaide

             /  April 17, 2012

            Oh, the meaningful, community uplifting things I could do if I didn’t have to worry about pesky health insurance or paying to live indoors.

            You get a sugar daddy! You get a sugar momma! You get a sugar daddy! Everyone gets a sugar momma!

            • koolaide

               /  April 17, 2012

              [ok, more like Oh, all the internet surfing and video watching I could do. but the other post makes me sound better ;) ]

        • caoil

           /  April 17, 2012

          I see what you mean. Job sites show several regional planning jobs in my metro area, and they all appear to want people with more than a bachelor’s degree.

        • R_Bargis

           /  April 17, 2012

          If you ever decide to get that degree I recommend checking out the University of Maryland’s program – http://www.arch.umd.edu/ . I work for the guy who helped found the Preservation part of the their Architecture, Planning, and Preservation school so along the years I’ve met a lot of faculty, graduates, and students, and it seems like a solid program.

    • R_Bargis

       /  April 17, 2012

      I can’t offer any advice about living or working in DC, but if you move to DC I’ll totally bring you move in food and buy you a drink!

      • carlos the dwarf

         /  April 17, 2012

        Luckily, two of my closest friends live in DC and have offered me a temporary place to stay while I get on my feet, so the move-in food won’t be necessary. But I would love to grab that drink! I’ll probably move sometime next month–you’ll hear about it when I do, for sure.

        • efgoldman

           /  April 17, 2012

          Plus the DC Commiehordenicks have a meetup roughly every quarter.

          Hear that, Southern New England Lost Battalion?!?

          • Roughly. The last one was in feb so the next one should be in May sometime? A picnic, yes?

        • R_Bargis

           /  April 17, 2012

          Sweet! LOUDLY ANNOUNCE when you’re moving in and perhaps there can be some informal Hoarde hang out at the Capitol Lounge or some other such place to welcome you to DC, and I will buy you your drink.

    • And the DC Horde takes another step towards critical mass. (Kidding, we’ll gladly take you in!)

    • I so, so support this plan! Go you!

  9. R_Bargis

     /  April 17, 2012

    Today in sexism: spot the gender stereotyping on this Job Search page for a community college: https://jobs.mwcc.edu/

    Sigh.

    • koolaide

       /  April 17, 2012

      geeze. and throw in some age & race stuff, too. I do like that the woman in the “part time faculty” pic has the crazy eyes that say (to me) “this ish is driving me batshit. run while you still can”

    • baiskeli

       /  April 17, 2012

      Holy F*ck!!!

      It’s like they’re not even trying to hide it.

    • caoil

       /  April 17, 2012

      All I can ever do when seeing things like this is to make growling noises like Sideshow Bob.

    • neighbors73

       /  April 17, 2012

      Maybe we should all collectively email them and let them know. Someone can write the letter, and the rest of us can just sign.

    • taylor16

       /  April 17, 2012

      That’s special.

      When my boss set up our company website on her own, she was very careful to pick a range of different people for the stock images that popped up. Different genders, races, ages, etc.

      And she’s one person from small-town Indiana. But a whole university committee (presumably) failed to notice the clear sexism in this one? That’s special.

      • koolaide

         /  April 17, 2012

        It’s just. odd. Digging into the school website, it appears that HR’s official name is “Department of Human Resources and Affirmative Action” http://mwcc.edu/hr/

        And digging further that all the listed HR employees save one are female (unless Tracy is a man, which is possible). And still they did not catch the problems.

      • baiskeli

         /  April 17, 2012

        Some of these incidents are self-inflicted injuries.

        A long time ago I worked at a company that was revamping its web site.

        When I and a female co-worker pointed out in a roundabout way that all the photos of employees they planned to put up/profiled were young, white and male, it came to my attention that a senior exec (male and white) had gone on a rant about ‘political correctness’, the ‘race card’ etc.

        I didn’t plan on staying there long (the hostility to diversity and a frat-boy culture being among the problems) so at that point I wasn’t willing to expend any political capital to make sure said company didn’t shoot itself in the foot. Website went up, one of the first comments was about the lack of diversity on the web site, and then suddenly people were running around like headless chickens trying to avoid a minor PR disaster.

        • stephen matlock

           /  April 17, 2012

          It’s really crazy. I can’t comment on some stuff – but at one point I was saving the recruiting posters that were going up. I wanted to point out to my HR group that – ahem – all the people being recruited belonged to one genotype, gender, and age.

          • baiskeli

             /  April 17, 2012

            I know companies that would have responded to our concerns with “Hey, you’re right, we will fix that, thanks!” But if you know that the response will be defensive, no one says anything. If you think there might be some political cost to you for speaking up, you just won’t do it.

            If you as a company don’t want to end up on the front pages as an object lesson in how to screw things up 101 (cue AT&T infamous World Map kerfuffle from the early 90’s*), you must have an open culture where employees can tell you when you’re about to make a mistake without being afraid of retaliation or ostracism.

            *Essentially AT&T had an internal employee magazine that had a World Map, with different people calling from the different continents. The U.S was a cowboy, Europe was a woman dressed in Lederhosen. In South America it was a big-hipped woman with a cockroach at her feet. In Africa, it was a gorilla.

            Apparently there was so much pushback and so much fallout that it is used as a case study in how not to screw up, and how not to respond to a screw up. If I remember correctly, this was the case where some employees saw the issue beforehand, raised it to management but essentially got bullied/ignored.

            • taylor16

               /  April 17, 2012

              NOBODY SAW A PROBLEM WITH THAT AT&T THING???? NOBODY???

              WTeverlovingF is wrong with people blargh no words I don’t even know.

            • stephen matlock

               /  April 17, 2012

              Sometimes low-level employees screw up. But it seems to me that it’s a matter more of upper-level people being in a hurry and not wanting to be disrupted..

              Well, in a perfect world we would still be stupid but maybe we would be a little more human.

    • efgoldman

       /  April 17, 2012

      Its a community college. If the budget hasn’t already been sliced to sushi, it will be shortly. I’m surprised they’re being allowed to hire at all.

  10. At the height of the insanity surrounding that one post (telling the GOP how babies are made), there was this one day that I got 33,000-ish hits. !!

    The result, though, is that when it all went back down to my new-normal of 650-1400 (it only goes over 900 when I have an open thread), the stats graph started to look just pathetic — like a few sky scrapers surrounded by ants. Which — given that new-normal is actually about 100 up from pre-insanity-normal — is really not fair.

    The good news is that this week, we’ll reach the point where those heady days fall off the graph, and suddenly – boom! – the numbers will look big again!

    And I thought I’d share.

    fin

  11. dmf

     /  April 17, 2012

  12. JHarper2

     /  April 17, 2012

    Guys, I found this at The Dish, but chose to link to the original TNR story.

    http://www.tnr.com/article/politics/102620/individual-mandate-history-affordable-care-act

    The original Congress, full of framers of the US constitution, passed a mandate for employers to purchase health insurance for sailors. George Washington signed it.
    A little later Congress, still full of framers, passed an individual mandate for sailors to purchase hospitalization insurance. John Adams signed it.
    They also passes an individual mandate to purchase guns, so liberals don’t have it all their way.

    • Dex

       /  April 17, 2012

      Wow, that is really great stuff. Very interesting.

      • neighbors73

         /  April 17, 2012

        Dex. I worry daily about you leaving Chicago and going back to Canada—-even though we have never met in person!

        This is weird, right? Sorry.

        • (Me, too. Though I have met him once. But only the once. So yeah, I feel you).

        • Dex

           /  April 17, 2012

          That’s very kind of you to say so. Don’t worry too much. We really do love it here, but we’ve got a baby on the way, and both my wife and I are in the middle of some serious career and family health uncertainties*. I generally try to have faith that it will all work out and things will settle down again, but it’s hard to say. We always seem to find a way (e.g., when we got married, I was living in KS and my wife was here. There were five jobs in my field within a two hour drive of Chicago, but I still managed to land a job here), but I think in times of uncertainty like this, we do look longingly toward home.

          *Cases in point, my MIL called last night with test results relating to a serious health issue, I interviewed for a job last week, my sister started radiation treatments last week, and my wife just got off the phone with a recruiter minutes ago. We are lucky in that we have two years’ worth of living expenses saved, but I hate uncertainty with the passion of a billion burning suns, and my wife hates change about that much, too, so we’re in the middle of an interesting ride right now.

          • taylor16

             /  April 17, 2012

            “I think in times of uncertainty like this, we do look longingly toward home.”

            I’m glad I’m not the only one who does this. When I first decided to leave academia behind, my first instinct was “I’ll just move back to metro Detroit! Let’s go!!”

            For multiple reasons I’m glad we didn’t do it … but most of all because reacting to uncertainty and change by wanting to run back to my hometown is not how I’ve lived my life.

            I’m glad you’ve both had some hits re: jobs! I’ve been thinking of you guys lately as I’ve seen friends trying to negotiate academic contracts and contemplate career moves. Is yours another academic position?

  13. neighbors73

     /  April 17, 2012

    Really, I have nothing to report. Except that student work, you’ll be happy to know, still won’t grade itself! Newman!

  14. David L

     /  April 17, 2012

    So, poll for the Horde, since my ideas on the topic of auto/pedestrian interactions are not always rational: When a car is stopped at the end of a driveway with its turn signal on, under what circumstances would you walk past the front of it?

    I wouldn’t dare unless I was either certain that there would not be an opening in traffic before I could get across or I was sure the driver was aware of me (and even probably then would wait for a specific signal). There is at least one young man in South Austin who doesn’t feel this way and walked in front of my car from the right side as all of my attention was on the traffic coming from the left. He is very lucky that there was a nice long gap in traffic so I wasn’t hitting the gas hard as soon as the road was clear. I wanted to give him a piece of my mind just as soon as my heart started beating again.

    • (You should get into the habit of looking both ways. People don’t do this and that is a very bad habit.)

      • This. I witnessed a close call the other day because the driver only looked left, never once looked right – and nearly flattened a kid on a bike.

        • I was driving, probably a few months back, pulling out of our street, and almost hit a jogger who ran past my car from the right just as I was turning right at the stop sign. And at first I was mad, stupid pedestrian running past my car but later I concluded that I was pretty much entirely at fault and I needed to break that habit pronto.

          • enstar

             /  April 17, 2012

            this is almost exactly what happened to me, only it was a couple of years ago, and i have to keep reminding myself not to forget because the phoenix area has very few pedestrians around and as such it is easier to get away with the bad habit.

        • As a cyclist, I pay a lot of attention to that. Which makes me incredibly pissed off when people have tinted windows, because I can’t tell whether or not they’ve looked in my direction.

    • koolaide

       /  April 17, 2012

      Oh. Wow. Sorry for your heart attack today and very glad that you didn’t hit the idiot.

      I generally wait until I’ve made some sort of eye contact w/ the driver before I dash in front of a car. Then again I’m a bit skittish. I’m from a college town that breeds its natives to jaywalk and the students are forever not looking where they walk. Every couple of years someone (usually a student not a townie) gets hit by a car or bus.

    • I would not step out in front of a car under those circumstances. But the young man who walked out in front of your car is balanced out by the drivers who have almost run me over because they didn’t look for pedestrians at all. Or the guy who turned his head away from me, such that he wasn’t even looking where he was going, just so he could pretend he didn’t see me. That was something.

      • David L

         /  April 17, 2012

        Yeah. I believe that I’ve said before around these parts that I’m not entirely rational because I have a titanium rod in my left leg as the result of a driver who swears he didn’t see a pedestrian crossing his path. So pretty much “keep out of the path of cars” is my big-I Issue that came out of that one.

    • taylor16

       /  April 17, 2012

      Oh man. When walking, I never step out until I have made eye contact with the driver.

      Yet, as a resident of a college town (as koolaide says above) I have learned that pedestrians are freakishly unaware of dangers around them – especially if they are 19 years old and texting. So, yeah. I am super-cautious when driving anywhere where pedestrians are present.

      I’m really glad you saw him in time!

    • Ian

       /  April 17, 2012

      Walking or on a bike, I try for eye contact, but all drivers have a sacred duty not to run into things–even things that aren’t where they should be. As a bus driver, one of my pet peeves was people who would cross the street from my left, starting behind me and angling around the front of the bus. It’s just a weird, dangerous thing to do. Thing is, it’s my job not to put the vehicle in motion unless I know that it’s not going to hit anything. So much of safe driving involves overcoming habit and not getting comfortable with the way things usually go. Long way of saying, I feel you, it’s happened to everyone, but Craig is right. You can’t have all of your attention on one side of the vehicle.

      • dmf

         /  April 17, 2012

        who ever came up with the idea of ‘right on red’ should be keelhauled, what a nightmare that has turned out to be, and what happened to yielding on yellow or when merging from on-ramps?

        • David L

           /  April 17, 2012

          what happened to yielding on yellow or when merging from on-ramps?

          I don’t think I’ve ever heard of yielding on yellow. As far as the merging goes, I generally have a philosophy that I should match the prevailing speed of the lane I’m about to join before I get into it, but there are ramps in this town where that’s just not possible and if I were to wait for a gap big enough to do that, I’d be waiting all day.

          • Dex

             /  April 17, 2012

            In Chicago’s downtown core, they have a pile of what are called suicide ramps: in three to five lanes of traffic, the on-ramps drop you onto the left-hand (i.e., fast) lane. To make matters worse, they often allow(ed) only a hundred or so feet for acceleration. Presently, they are rebuilding most all of them, not to switch sides, but to at least give extra road for acceleration.

            • David L

               /  April 17, 2012

              They’ve been slowly replacing the original, 1950s-designed entrances and exits around here whenever they find money, but there are still some really nasty ones around. There’s one I use occasionally that I compare to the inner tube chutes at the local water park: It drops you 20 feet in less than 100 yards and there’s no room to merge at the end because of the abutment for an overpass. You just have to hold on tight and hope that there’s nobody in the way when you get to the bottom.

            • I DO NOT MISS THOSE RAMPS.

              ALLCAPS FOR SERIOUS.

          • The ones I hate the most are the entrance ramps that dump you into the ‘exit only’ lane for another major highway. Lots of people are simultaneously trying to pile into the same lane and it’s just bad news all around.

        • Ian

           /  April 17, 2012

          Nobody knows arm signals anymore!

          • efgoldman

             /  April 17, 2012

            I do!
            I have a theory, that people who don’t use their turn signals (or turn them on when they’re already halfway through the turn or off ramp – a very RI behavior) never learned hand signals when they learned how to ride their bike or first learned to drive.

            • Ian

               /  April 17, 2012

              I was pretending to be a disgruntled oldster, when along comes the real thing!

              • efgoldman

                 /  April 17, 2012

                No, no. I’m gruntled.
                I have my onion tied to my belt, I’m fine.

          • R_Bargis

             /  April 17, 2012

            Maryland no longer teaches hand signals in drivers ed (which is a 30 hour class that is mandatory, regardless of age).

            /insert rant here about how much a waste of time and money drivers ed is

          • … There are driving-related arm signals?

            • Bookwoman

               /  April 18, 2012

              (pulls up rocking chair and speaks in quavery voice)
              Young woman, when I was a girl, we didn’t have no new-fangled blinky lights on our cars. No siree. If’n you wanted to make a left turn, you rolled down your window with that there crank and stuck your arm straight out. If’n you wanted to make a right you raised your arm straight up from the elbow.

              Also too, the maximum speed limit was 15 miles an hour and you had to put moonshine in the engine ever’ 2 hours or she’d seize up on ya.

      • Rosa

         /  April 17, 2012

        does eye contact really work for all of you? I’ve always found that pretending not to see the car works better, because it scares drivers, and half the time when I make eye contact they think “cool, she sees me, now i can go because of course she will get out of the way!”

        I read Traffice because someone from the Hoard recommended it, and it validated my “eye contact is a bad idea” theory, but I always see people recommending eye contact.

        (My “favorite” example of the eye contact problem is crossing Hwy 55 at the light, because the bike bridge is broken. Crossing on the walk signal, when cars want to turn right on their green light. One time on my bike with the 6 year old on his little bike next to me someone totally looked at me and then started turning toward us as we crossed. I kicked his bumper, he stopped, I flipped him off and he rolled down his wondow and yelled “NICE TEACHING YOUR KID TO FLIP PEOPLE OFF!” As if he hadn’t just nearly run us both down.)

        • Ian

           /  April 18, 2012

          Eye contact tells me they know I’m there. I can usually see what they’re going to do next from their expression and body language. Also, I have an arsenal of stern looks.

          • Rosa

             /  April 18, 2012

            I must just always look like i ought to yield, or something. It’s not like Minnesota drivers are that aggressive.

    • Electronic_Neko

       /  April 17, 2012

      Glad you managed to stop in time! I probably would have tried to walk behind your car instead of in front of it in that situation. I try and make eye contact when possible, since drivers tend to turn abruptly downtown and to drift into pedestrian territory even when they shouldn’t. But ultimately it’s the driver’s duty to be aware of who is around them, especially in areas of high pedestrian traffic.

      It’s really, really important to look both ways. I saw a scary accident a couple of years ago on my way to work….a driver turning from a side road onto a main road looked for oncoming traffic from the left, but not the right and got T-boned. Luckily everyone walked away.

    • Remember some of us who are walking around are well on our way to senility, You can’t always be perfect, but always assuming the other person is inept, uncoordinated, and much older than they look is the safest way.

    • lasslisa

       /  April 17, 2012

      I would wait or walk behind the car, unless I had specific eye contact with the driver and it looked like they would be waiting for a while. And that’s true regardless of whether their turn signal is on – someone stopped at the end of a driveway is planning to pull out.

      Of course, most of the sidewalks or crosswalks here are several feet back from the road/intersection, so you can easily pull up through the sidewalk (which also can improve visibility and make it faster to turn if there’s a limited gap in traffic).

    • NealH

       /  April 17, 2012

      Always, always, look right.

      To answer your question, I would, almost always, walk (or more commonly this seems to happen when I am out for a run) in front of the car, but I’m stupid and stubborn that way.

      It is usually easy to tell which drivers are going to forget to look right because they’re facing left and the car is starting to creep. In this case, and sometimes when they’re stopped too, I have been known to tap the hood to alert them to the fact that they are about to hit me. If it’s clear that they won’t have time to stop and that they’re going to blow through regardless of the fact that they would hit me if I continued on my path, I’ll stop, but they’ll usually get a smack on their rear panel. Probably not the wisest thing to do, but drivers who violate pedestrain right-of-way . . .

      • David L

         /  April 17, 2012

        What I’m trying to get at here is not so much “can you believe the nerve of that guy?” but that it’s inherently risky to put yourself into a situation where your personal safety is dependent on someone else following the rules about the right-of-way. Heck, I was reaching for the brake a couple of times on the drive home because it suddenly seems like everyone in this town waits until the last possible second to brake for stop signs/red lights and, had they continued at the rate they had been going, they would have ended up at the same place at the same time as myself.

      • Ian

         /  April 17, 2012

        “I’ll stop, but they’ll usually get a smack on their rear panel.”

        Heh. I did this on occasion when lived in the big city. Turns out there’s nothing a douchebag hates more than somebody touching his car.

    • Rosa

       /  April 17, 2012

      That’s so scary. I hate that moment, in the car, when I have to remember I’m half blind and driving something that can kill people on accident.

      But as the pedestrian: Alone, I would pretend I didn’t see him and walk right in front, but prepared to jump out of the way if I had to. In my younger, more aggro days, i might knock in the window or kick the door if he started to turn into me because of not looking. Sidewalks are for people.

      With my kid I make eye contact and walk, but prepared to yank him out of the way – because the number of drivers who look right at me (even waved, one morning right by the schoolbus!) and then proceed to almost run me over is about 1/week. And that’s at corners with stoplights.

  15. enstar

     /  April 17, 2012

    pho for dinner, and then cabin in the woods afterward.

    ah, standardized test week, i can thank you only for this free time you give me.

    • mythopoeia

       /  April 17, 2012

      I am so torn about Cabin in the Woods, because on the one hand Whedon, but on the other hand I just do not do horror. Even when it gets all meta. I will look forward to a review from you!

      • enstar

         /  April 17, 2012

        i used to love horror films, but kind of burned out on them in high school and college. nowadays i hardly ever watch them, but when i do, i love them with an irrepressible fury.

      • I’m seeing it tonight. I’ll let you know!!

  16. taylor16

     /  April 17, 2012

    So it looks like I’m going to sign a contract to stay on at my current job (and here in Indiana) for three more years.

    My boss made me an offer I basically couldn’t refuse – basically the same job duties I’m doing now, but for a lot more money and more flexibility and a shiny new job title for my resume. And since I have no idea what I want to do next, career-wise, it’s not like I have any other job opportunities in the pipeline. And we are still in a lot of debt, so this raise would help us SIGNIFICANTLY in that regard.

    And yet, I really wanted to move out of this town. It’s not a bad place to live … there’s actually quite a bit to do, and it’s cheap, and we own a home and have friends and whatnot. But still … it’s Indiana. I wanted to move away. I wanted a big career doing something meaningful … but I’m going to stay in medical billing? Ewww.

    As I’ve said, though, my company’s a good one. My boss emphasizes treating patients well and making insurances pay claims. In other words, we’re encouraged to let patient claims sit on our A/R list for several years, if that’s how long it takes the insurance company to pay it properly. You’ll never get a random bill from our office that I can’t (1) explain or (2) reverse if necessary. We’re encouraged to explain things to patients and to help them fight their insurance companies if they want to. Etc. It’s not a bad place to work, and it’s not like if I quit the medical billing industry would cease to exist. I’m not hurting anything by continuing to work here.

    And yet, part of me can’t believe that a few years ago I was moving gung-ho toward an academic career … and now I’m signing onto a soul-sucking (not really) business job. Don’t get me wrong – I don’t want the academic career back. I haven’t missed it one bit in the past year. But I wish I knew what I *did* want to do next.

    Then again, with a three-year-contract taking the pressure off … I will probably be able to do some research and figure out what career I want to pursue next. And since we won’t be buried under piles of debt, I’ll be in a better position to pursue whatever that is, even if I have to start out at the bottom in a new field.

    So it’s a good decision to take the promotion. I just expected to be more excited when I finally got a good job offer that stood the chance of getting us out of debt. Instead, I’m like … meh. But I guess that’s how life goes, isn’t it? Sometimes you just have to make the pragmatic decision, even if it’s not something you’re super-excited about.

    So wish me luck on career-hunting and on surviving three more years in Indiana! Thank god for the Horde to keep me sane and entertained at work. :)

    (Sorry for rambling … I’m on hour seven of the webinar. Aaaahhh.)

    • taylor16

       /  April 17, 2012

      (in other news: if anyone is thinking southern Indiana would be a nice place to live, we are going to be hiring quite a few people in the next six months or so. I also know a guy at a nice local restaurant that will hook you up with craft beer and tasty food. :)

    • koolaide

       /  April 17, 2012

      congrats on the raise & new title :) I so much understand your feelings. I, too, want a career doing something meaningful and (after ditching a phd plan) am in a job that isn’t a career or meaningful but does provide good insurance & $ for food. And I cast my covetous eyes around at others’ shiny jobs.

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        I am beginning to think that we should put our collective heads together and start a Horde-based business that we can all work at from our various points around the globe. I could coordinate the health care plan. :)

        • koolaide

           /  April 17, 2012

          I’m totally in.

        • caoil

           /  April 17, 2012

          OoooooOOoO shiny!
          (I’m pretty good with software if that counts for anything)

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        Thanks. I think I can survive it. It’s a hippie college town, right? Could be worse.

        • dmf

           /  April 17, 2012

          yep, you could be here in omaha…

          • taylor16

             /  April 17, 2012

            Aww, I visited Omaha a couple of years ago. For a night. Ate at a nice brewery and did a little shopping … it wasn’t too bad.

            Although I imagine that would get a little old for more than a night or two, huh?

            • dmf

               /  April 17, 2012

              i live in that old market area but the “car” parked next to mine is a giant white hummer with a fox news license plate which about sums things up here in a state with child hunger and crumbling infrastructure that makes one think of the biblebelt, if anyone has some spare change please support bob kerrey’s senate run, its a longshot but hope is a rare commodity in these parts.

              • wearyvoter

                 /  April 17, 2012

                We lived in Nebraska when Bob Kerrey was governor. (He was a widower, and was dating Debra Winger for a time in the mid-ish 80s.) I’d send some spare $$ his way.

      • enstar

         /  April 17, 2012

        andrew!

    • Dex

       /  April 17, 2012

      Congratulations on the offer! I agree that it seems like a no-brainer. With your situation, you can just bank money like crazy, giving you and your husband more and more options in terms of what you want to do next. I envy you in that your husband has a fairly portable career. What I’d give for either my wife or me to have a career with widely- and frequently-available positions.

      Not hating one’s job is a luxury that many people don’t have, so that’s great. It also seems like you are not massively over-worked in your job, so this may allow you time to search for other careers or upgrade skills that you might need in the future career of your choice.

      As you know, my wife and I lived in Indiana for 5 & 6 years respectively and then I spent 3 years in Kansas. I can totally identify with wanting to move away, but we made it a point to find a way to enjoy ourselves. We took road trips and tried to take advantage of the best things that the area we lived in had to offer. In the end, the years of sacrifice were worth to us, and I’m sure it will ultimately be worth it to you, too. Good luck!

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        Just last night, we started making an “Living in Indiana Bucket List.” If we’re gonna be here, dammit, we’re gonna amuse ourselves. :)

        And actually, one upside to this that I didn’t mention above is that it might allow my husband some time to explore career options as well. He’s seen a few part-time positions that weren’t in restaurants go by over the past couple of years, but didn’t apply since we didn’t know when we were leaving town. But since (1) he’s not sure he wants to stay in restaurants long term and (2) his schedule is very flexible, this might be an opportunity for him to get some experience in other fields as well.

        Really, it’s a win-win. I know this. I just wanted to move. Then again, if we lose our pile of debt maybe we can actually afford to move to Chicago like we’ve always wanted to … right now, the cost of living increase plus our debt burden would make that impossible.

    • Bookwoman

       /  April 17, 2012

      basically the same job duties I’m doing now, but for a lot more money and more flexibility and a shiny new job title for my resume.

      That sounds like a very, very good thing, especially in this economy. Congrats!

    • JHarper2

       /  April 17, 2012

      First congratulations and good luck.
      Second, you have an out of the contract if you need it. Judge, they made me sign at hour seven of a webinar. I obvs couldn’t have known what I was signing.
      Third. If you are not sure where you want to go, getting reasonably paid where you are is a good option.
      Four. When you are ready to go, you will travel lighter with less debt.
      Five. Its Indiana not Mississippi.
      Six. Congrats at being good at your job that they want to keep you.
      Seven. Keep fighting the good fight for the patients.
      Eight. Congrats again and the best of luck.

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        1. Thanks!
        2. I’m pretty sure I’m actually starting to lose it. I’m going to hear the webinar leader’s voice in my head tonight in my nightmares. (Yes, he’s been doing it all day. Now there’s a job I wouldn’t like.)
        3. This is what I’m figuring. It’ll be okay. It’s just an odd feeling, to be totally unenthused.
        4. This is really the key thing. We are slowly paying down debt at our current salaries. At the new income, it’ll get paid down quickly (barring some huge emergency). This is good. I was stupid in my twenties … there’s no reason I should keep paying for it until I’m in my forties. Time to knock out the debt and free up some options.
        5. I know. And it’s actually Bloomington, which is a pretty cool, progressive little place to live. It’s not bad here, at all. Really and truly. I’m just a city kid at heart. :)
        6-8. Thanks … you are so sweet. :)

    • helensprogeny

       /  April 17, 2012

      Taylor, I can relate to this post in many, many ways that I don’t have time to elaborate on because I have to go to work soon. But I think the way I most connect is that I regularly berate myself for not having a bigger job. By which I mean either more challenging or more socially relevant. Here I am a woman with a JD, clearly capable of more, working (for years!) as a massage therapist in a hotel spa (a couple of them) where my clients are upper middle class to wealthy.

      I beat myself up pretty often, and it’s been especially bad in the last 5-6 yrs, since a huge part of me has really wanted to move on and do something else. Much to my dismay the thing that most keeps me where I am is my inability to figure out what I want to do next. (When I get to the bottom of my heart of hearts, the answer always seems to be: But I don’t want to work at all. Which is not even remotely constructive, as you can imagine.)

      But what I also keep coming back to is: the reason I got into massage in the first place was to explore my own spiritual and emotional life, and in doing the work I do, I afford myself the time to do what I need to do on that score while also giving to other people a measure of comfort, peace, positivity and health. So I’m doing something I need to do for myself while I’m also not doing anything to hurt anyone else.

      What I’m trying to get to here really is: Congratulations on your promotion. It’s wonderful and delightful and healthy to have enough money to pay off debt. But more than anything, never, ever undervalue or forget that the work that you do in keeping insurance companies honest and helping real people is absolutely critical. It is spiritual work, and I mean that sincerely. No, it’s not what you want to be doing. But it’s important, genuinely valuable work and it’s a great thing to be doing while you’re paying off your debts and thinking about what to do in the future.

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        Thanks. And yes, I know that at the end I’m actually on the good side in this whole gross system. Working on behalf of the patients (and the doctors who actually do the work, for that matter) is certainly better than being on the insurance side.

        And yet, I guess I just wish I knew where I was going next. But I suppose that’s what the next few years will be for. I am open to any and all ideas. :)

    • neighbors73

       /  April 17, 2012

      Congratulations! It sounds like a good thing. And, you need to find a way to make a business trip to chicago. Heh.

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        Another nice perk of this will be that I will probably be able to make an upcoming horde meetup in Chicago. More money + more flexbility + a girl who loves to drive = CHICAGO ROADTRIP!!

        So yeah. Tentatively count me in for the next one. :)

        • aaron singer

           /  April 17, 2012

          I skipped out of the last Horde get-together here in Chicago. I would love to be able to make the next one!*

          *If I don’t find a campaign job somewhere else first.

    • SWNC

       /  April 17, 2012

      Congratulations on the raise and the shiny new job title! That’s awesome. When I was younger, I felt it was really important for me to have a career that I was passionate about. Now I firmly believe that it’s Just Fine to have a job that you just like okay as long as it allows you the freedom to do other things–devote time and energy to your real passions, pay down debt, support your spouse in his/her career change.

      When I get to the bottom of my heart of hearts, the answer always seems to be: But I don’t want to work at all.
      Oh, Lord, don’t I know it. A big part of my twenties was coming to terms with the fact that I am a hobbit at heart.

    • This sounds like a win-win, though I strongly emphathize with your desire to move onward and upward crashing right into your reality. Make the most of this time, figure out what you do want to be doing – maybe something that uses your PhD outside of academia? – so that when you’re ready you can jump into it with both feet.

      And honestly, you do amazing work at the medical billing organization if your tips to the Horde are any indication. You make the world slightly better for people by being there.

  17. dmf

     /  April 17, 2012

    • dmf

       /  April 17, 2012

      was catching up with an old comrade from undergrad days who is now a prof. in colorado but for years taught labor-organizing/poli-sci in her native colombia about how we are back again in the undertow of reagan and she reminded me that it never really went away which left me wondering how did i lose sight of how badly things were going in terms of wages and unions and such, how did we all get so sucked in by the clintons and their wallstreet economic team?

      • carlosthedwarf

         /  April 17, 2012

        The economy was doing well. A booming economy can paper over a lot of society’s flaws.

  18. 15 minutes until its time to get dressed and look pretty. Until then, I’m going to enjoy reading all your comments while staring out at the view.

    It’s a nice view.

    • You should go read the comment I made on your blog about how the Red Hot Chili Peppers are worse than, probably not Hitler, but at least some mid-level dictator like Enver Hoxha or something.

      • taylor16

         /  April 17, 2012

        Worse than Billy Joel?

      • David L

         /  April 17, 2012

        I’m mixed on them. I like a bunch of their early stuff, then they went into that period in the last decade or so where Kiedis suddenly tried to get all slow and serious, except that every song was basically “Hey! I’m from California!” and they completely lost me.

        • They were an okay party band, if you like that sort of thing, and then they discovered their ability to write songs aimed square at the heart of AOR stations, and they became a hideously self-serious bunch of d-bags, chasing after their next hit. Flea seems like he’s probably still pretty cool, I guess.

          • aaron singer

             /  April 17, 2012

            They were pretty mediocre when I saw them headline Lollapalooza in 2006. Kanye was pretty damn good. And now they’re headlining again this year, along with Black Sabbath. Although the lineup is decent outside of that, I likely can’t afford to go, anyway.

    • efgoldman

       /  April 17, 2012

      You look MAHvelous!

  19. Question: Is that photo of Clinton hamming it up while Obama looks like he has a headache real? Or is that just the meme of the day?

    • David L

       /  April 17, 2012

      It’s real. I had to see it before I remembered the moment and some quick Googling turns this up from December 2010:

      http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/bill-clinton-stumps-obama-gop-tax-cut-deal/story?id=12368285#.T44ztKSgie4

      President Obama today brought out former president and Democratic heavyweight Bill Clinton for an impromptu press conference to tout his tax cut deal with Republicans that has earned the ire of many liberal Democrats.

      “The agreement, taken as a whole,” Clinton said, “is, I believe, the best bipartisan agreement we can reach to help the largest number of Americans, and to maximize the chances that the economic recovery will accelerate and create more jobs, and to minimize the chances that it will slip back, which is what has happened in other financial collapses.”

  20. koolaide

     /  April 17, 2012

    Am I the only sentimental softie that saves years old voicemail messages from very young children related to me b/c voicemail from 2-3 yr olds is SOOOO CUTE.

  21. If Anders Breivik is criminally insane then I’m Mayor fucking McCheese.

  22. mythopoeia

     /  April 17, 2012

    I have gotten 8 hours of sleep and drunk no caffeine at work two days in a row. Think I can make it to three?

    • Bookwoman

       /  April 17, 2012

      I have faith in you!

    • carlosthedwarf

       /  April 17, 2012

      I don’t think I’ve done that even once since I graduated college. That’s an impressive accomplishment.

    • enstar

       /  April 17, 2012

      oh you poor thing. in reality, you are going on about 13 years of perpetual sleep deprivation, and have enough caffeine in your veins to cause your imagination to believe what you just said.

    • SWNC

       /  April 17, 2012

      Damn–I’m impressed. I can’t remember the last time I got 8 hours of sleep during the work week.

  23. caoil

     /  April 17, 2012

    Maps! Is anyone else giddy about cartography? I have a feeling I’m going to need to buy this book at some point in the near future. Since I don’t imagine I’m going to get to Britain anytime soon, this will have to do.

    • Bookwoman

       /  April 17, 2012

      I love old maps (especially ones by Ortelius), and own a few. They are magnificent.

      • carlosthedwarf

         /  April 17, 2012

        I’ve loved maps my whole life, to the extent that, when my parents designed my bedroom when I was 8, they got me old map wallpaper. Kind of like this: http://www.creativewallcovering.com/pc/1-hah16172/80/Oceanic+Navigational+Charts+Wallcovering.html
        It’s stood the test of time more than anything else in my room.

      • carlosthedwarf

         /  April 17, 2012

        There is very little in my life that has been as constant as my love of maps. I still have old-map wallpaper in my bedroom.

        • aaron singer

           /  April 17, 2012

          The only time I would sit still when I was little (old enough to read, obviously, so maybe at around 8) was in front of an atlas. I think I had most of the interstate highway system memorized by 9 or 10. I still love geography to this day.

          • caoil

             /  April 17, 2012

            Did you have a globe as well? I did – a set of both the earth and the moon – I don’t know who gave it to me but it was a fixture in my bedroom well into my teens. I can’t even say how many hours I spent looking at the seas on the moon.

  24. stephen matlock

     /  April 17, 2012

    Emily,

    I’ve frittered away two days doing just what I like to do and haven’t been working on the book…

    Can you use shame or something to get me back on task? Maybe that will work.

    • HOW MANY TIMES DO I HAVE TO TELL YOU TO EAT OVER YOUR PLATE?!?!

      Oh wait, that’s for my boy.

      HOW MANY TIMES DO I HAVE TO TELL YOU TO PICK UP THIS DESK?!?!

      No, hold on, that’s the girl’s.

      Um.

      HOW MANY TIMES DO I HAVE TO TELL YOU NOT TO FRITTER AWAY YOUR FREE TIME JUST BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT FEELS GOOD AND I WOULD EVEN SUGGEST THAT MAYBE YOUR WRITERLY BRAIN ACTUALLY NEEDS IT THAT’S WHY YOU’RE DOING IT?!?!

      Hold on, I don’t think that’s what you meant.

      • JHarper2

         /  April 17, 2012

        Damn it Emily! Get a LIKE Button

      • stephen matlock

         /  April 19, 2012

        Heh. Exactly.

      • stephen matlock

         /  April 19, 2012

        I will say I did pretty well yesterday. Got through a line edit of the first half. Another 40,000 words to go today.

        I’m surely struggling with the first two chapters.

        And while this is probably of little interest, I struggle with the certain knowledge that particular events of secondary import are going to get far more criticism than the main theme and events. 13-year-old boys in the secrecy of their minds and among their friends talk differently and act differently than they do around adults and others. I’m afraid I’m quite blunt about some stuff that a lot of grown-ups would like to imagine doesn’t happen, but I have to remind them that even though it was back in the Taft administration, I was a 13-year-old boy once myself, and I have the memory (not to mention the body) of an elephant.

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