An open thread for the teeming Commies & their Horde.

The wind is so crazy here in the Greater Chicagoland Metropolitan Area that it feels a bit like we’re on the wind-swept steppes — you know, with the Khan. Who has apparently abandoned us for some other battalion, or something.

Anyhoo! Open thread!

Standard FYI clause: My rule of thumb is that I wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

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178 Comments

  1. The other night, I sat and read through the most recent open thread here in the Student Lounge (the one I thought I’d be able to participate in, but then couldn’t), reading comment by comment, even the ones I couldn’t understand because they involved crafts that I cannot even name – and I loved it so much.

    I <3 you guys a very great deal. Thanks for hanging out.

    Reply
    • Bookwoman

       /  April 16, 2012

      We <3 you too! Thanks for giving us such a great student lounge.

      Reply
    • caoil

       /  April 16, 2012

      This may not make much sense outside my head, but I find these threads comforting. As in, it’s nice to know that out there in the mists are some wonderful people, going about their day, making a difference in the world. And so on.

      Reply
    • koolaide

       /  April 16, 2012

      Thank you for hosting this hangout.

      Reply
    • efgoldman

       /  April 16, 2012

      Oh, gawd. You’re goona’ make me cry, and then Craig and Vanderhoff will mock me the rest of the day.

      Reply
      • caoil

         /  April 16, 2012

        Maybe, but you know they’ll be leaving the room periodically to wipe away their own tears where no one can see.

        Reply
        • JHarper2

           /  April 16, 2012

          Vanderhoff’s allergies are acting up.

          Reply
          • David L

             /  April 16, 2012

            To merge this and the unusually-warm weather talk: Last weekend, I was driving to my parents’ house after dinner with the windows rolled down and I could already smell the ragweed growing. It’s going to be a bad year for me.

            Reply
      • That’s just the stroke talkin’. I know you’re really a cold fish underneath it all.

        Reply
        • efgoldman

           /  April 16, 2012

          It is true, I taught Vanderhoff and Furious Craig everything they know.

          Reply
    • JHarper2

       /  April 16, 2012

      We love our host, you know, especially the comfy couch.

      Reply
      • SOMEDAY WE’LL ALL MEET ON AN ACTUAL COMFY COUCH.

        Reply
      • PS How ya doin’, buddy? If you feel like sharing.

        Reply
        • JHarper2

           /  April 16, 2012

          Hi there. Trying to get back to normal. I am much relieved at only having dialysis 4 days a week, its like working part time after giving up being a workaholic.
          To recap for those who came in late, I had my Parathyroids removed in March because the little buggers were working overtime and causing a condition called Calciphylaxis which was threatening and very painful.
          Well since the operation, which went well I have felt much better and gotten rid of the painkillers which made me dull and slow. My neurologist says I am making a good recovery from the nerve damage that the overactive parathyroids caused, but that it will take a long time to see how recovery there is. He suspects based on symptoms that damage occurred over a long time.
          A family member had surgery a week and a half ago that went well and this person is now home and recovering.

          Oh and it snowed last night and this morning. It was spring a month ago, and now it snows after practically no snow when it was winter? It makes no sense I tell you. Also I am back reading books! I bought a book and finished it in two days. Not a complex book, just a murder mystery but still I finished a book in under a month. I’m coming back baby! And people till me how much better I look than in the winter. Apparently they were lying to my face just so I wouldn’t get too discouraged. Well that’s about it for Today in Oversharing.

          Reply
          • SWNC

             /  April 16, 2012

            So glad to hear that you’re feeling better!
            (I just finished a great murder mystery, 1222 by Anne Holt, if you’re looking for something new to read.)

            Reply
          • 4/17/12: It just occurred to me to look for your reply here rather than today’s open thread! (I get notifications of all comments of course, but when there’s an open thread there are so many that I often can’t see a single tree for the forest).

            I’m so glad to hear all of this! The bit about reading strikes me as particularly important (and having friends who will lie to our faces when need be – also important). If one can’t read, really, one is just putting in time, and that’s no good at all!

            xoxox to you!

            Reply
    • helensprogeny

       /  April 16, 2012

      I’m very late to this thread, but I just wanted to say that I came very, very close to posting something nearly identical to this on the TNC Facebook page yesterday. Even on days like today when I’m working long hours and away from my computer all day and unable to check in, I know that the Horde is either at the Main House, in the Student Lounge or chatting away in the comfort of the FB page. And it makes me happy. Even when I don’t get to participate, it makes me happy to know the conversation is going on.

      Emily, I also wanted to echo everyone here who said thanks for graciously opening your space to us. Not just the open threads, but the other posts too. I read them all, and it’s a very high quality read indeed.

      Reply
  2. Mondays, case of.
    Summing up my day, I present Nina: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0N05WL2NlLo

    Reply
    • efgoldman

       /  April 16, 2012

      Does anybody watch to the end?
      Oh well, people listen to Philip Glass, too.

      Reply
  3. Ugh. Today sucks.

    So go to my blog and read my recaps of GoT and Madmen, and enjoy Saturday’s full on Caturday because I just can’t even.

    Reply
    • I’m sorry honey. Perhaps interspecies snorgling might help? http://cuteoverload.com/2012/04/11/update-on-junebug-and-burnett/

      Reply
      • I’m on my way to stand in line at the Post Office.
        That should tell you how my day is going.

        Reply
      • I am now home. Tomorrow there is an event at work, so I will not be around.
        Emergecy name badge kit has been obtained. Taxes for all of our entities have been certified mailed. Bags of coffee will be bought at Target on the way to work tomorrow.

        Today…I just want to sit in my warm house and watch my kitties play.

        Reply
    • caoil

       /  April 16, 2012

      It’s funny that you put up some Simon’s Cat on the weekend. I was wearing my SC tshirt at one point. oooOOooo synchronicity *sings Twilight Zone music*

      Also today does suck. But over here, mostly because my coworker is in whiny, grumpy mode.

      Reply
  4. Justin

     /  April 16, 2012

    Yes, I am aware that the Padres are terrible this season so far. That doesn’t make this play any less ridiculous:

    The ump calls foul, and then changes his call when the catcher throws the ball. I mean seriously?

    Reply
    • efgoldman

       /  April 16, 2012

      I just thought it was wonderful that MLB paid such a humongous homage to Douglas Adams, having every player on every team wear number 42 yesterday.

      [Yeah, I know. But somebody had to.]

      Reply
  5. And on an entirely different note, this weekend I tried to read Little Brother, a book that my son liked and that has been absolutely buried in praise – and I hated it!

    And not in that “not my cup of tea” sort of way that I hate the Tom Bombadil parts of LOTR – no, I hated it in that “this is a really badly written book” sort of way. Pages upon pages upon PAGES of exposition (SO MUCH telling instead of showing! SO MUCH!), all the subtlety of a jackhammer, and a main character that reads like a pastiche of ideas that Cory Doctorow likes, and stuff he likes to believe about the younger generation.

    What the ever loving fuck? HOW did this book come to be awarded, feted and honored?!

    (And I really like Doctorow! Dang it!)

    Reply
    • SWNC

       /  April 16, 2012

      I don’t care for Cory Doctorow either. He just seems very pleased with his own cleverness.

      Reply
      • I mean honestly. The main character and one of his best friends go at it hammer-&-tongs at one point, and the fight’s over, the main character says (in parenthesis!), something along the lines of “(he’s usually very laid back. That’s why I was so surprised by his outburst.)”

        Isn’t that the sort of thing that we were supposed to have picked up from reading the book?

        Reply
    • neighbors73

       /  April 16, 2012

      I see what you mean, but I think kids need to be hit over the head by things sometimes.

      Reply
  6. Captain Button

     /  April 16, 2012

    SPOILER WARNING: Game Of Thrones TV series

    Regarding the latest Game Of Thrones episode, was Margaery Tyrell a bit overexcited about the duel between Brienne and her brother Loras in a creepy way, or was it just me?

    Was Brienne’s opponent Loras in the book, or are they just doing understandable character consolidation again, as with Allar Deem, who got rolled up into his boss Janos Slynt previously.

    With the Arry plotline they cut to the chase, off to Harrenhall after one battle.

    Reply
  7. baiskeli

     /  April 16, 2012

    Bike geek stuff.

    Got a new road bike. Review below

    ————————————–
    2011 Focus Izalco Ultegra review

    I finally got a new bike. I test rode a Scott Team Issue last year and was so impressed that the Scott Foil 20 (with Ultegra) would be my next bike. I also looked at the Focus Izalco and my bike shop offered me a great deal on a 2011 58 cm model. I took it for a test ride (40+ group ride) this saturday and ended up buying it instead of the FOIL 20. I think I liked both bikes equally, but the Focus was markedly cheaper.

    Things I like

    1: Stiff but comfortable*
    2: Light (I hear that Focus frames tend to be heavy but it’s all relative, I’m coming from a 19-20lb steel bike and this one weighs under 17 lbs and will be about 16.5 lbs with my regular wheels)
    3: It fit me to a T. I put the saddle at the same height as my other bike and with my hands in the hood the front wheel hub is obscured by the handlebars. After the 40 mile ride, nothing ached.
    4: Bike comes out of the box with a Fizik Arione saddle, which is one of my favorite saddles.
    5: The handlebars have a flat portion that is really comfortable to hold.
    6: Internal cable routing, pretty cool.
    7: Compact crank (vs my standard double). At first, I thought this would be a negative but I seem to have all the gearing range I need. We did hill repeats last week and on my old bike (double) I was suffering along at 60-70 rpm on one section. With this guy, even on a couple of steep hills, I was spinning happily away and actually faster.

    Things I didn’t like/questions

    1: The handlbars are slightly narrower than I’m used to. But then again, I always switch out handlebars on bikes to be slightly wider
    2: Ultegra 10 speed hoods are not as comfy as my Ultegra 9 speed hoods.
    3: The bike comes with Mavic Ksyrium Equipe, they are good wheels, but I wonder how the bike will feel when I slap on my Easton EA90s (currently out for spoke replacement yet again). I suspect the ride might be slightly harsher, but still more comfy than my old bike.
    4: The rear seatstays arch inwards, making mounting a Garmin Speed Sensor for the Edge 500 a bit hard to mount (you have to straighten out the sensor arm upwards rather than nestle it against the seatstay. Looks a bit weird and fragile, but apparently tons of people do this with no problem)

    Overall, I was pretty impressed. I was actually hesitant to even look at Focus because they have shorter top tubes to seat tubes (for example, Scott FOIL 58 has a 58 top tube, Cannondale super six 58 has a 57.5 top tube, but Focus Izalco 58 has a 57 top tube. With my saddle at the correct height, I have a 2.5-2.75 inch drop, but that seems comfortable (which suprises me). I could always flip the stem but after a couple of rides, I’m comfy and there is no need to do so.

    Ride wise, I seemed to notice a 1-1.5 mph improvement over the same terrain at the same heart-rate. Of course, it could all be psychological, but I noticed that going uphill is much easier, especially if I’m standing, there is virtually no flex in this frame (I’m 175 lbs). Sprinting is a joy, but the difference there between this bike and my old bike is not that noticeable (might be the wheels, I’ll re-evaluate with the Eastons when they come back).
    ————————————–

    Reply
    • The new 10-speed hoods feel weird at first, but after riding on them for about six months, I think they’re actually a bit more comfortable in the long run than the old 9-speed style. Admittedly I’m using 105s instead of Ultegra, but that’s been my general impression between the two.

      Compact cranks FTW. I think that’s what’s going to go on my Softride when I finally get around to changing out the old 9-speed component set (I bought the bike in 2003 and haven’t changed anything other than wheels, handlebars and the seat). I’m never going to need the upper end of my cassette for anything but pushing down big hills hard and that’s a lot less important to me than being able to get up hills comfortably. 39/26 just doesn’t cut it for some of the stuff around here.

      Reply
      • stephen matlock

         /  April 16, 2012

        a) Love the review.
        b) Insanely jealous that it works out for you to do so much riding.

        Reply
        • baiskeli

           /  April 16, 2012

          Thanks. A fair amount of my riding is commuting to work, which I’ll probably be doing on my steel bike.

          Reply
          • Also, steel bikes FTW. My 90s-era Trek 520 frame (which is actually the bike with the 10-speed component set) has served me incredibly well for the last decade. Actually starting to think about doing some touring, once I figure out whether or not I need to invest in a front rack as well.

            Reply
            • Ian

               /  April 16, 2012

              You probably don’t need a front rack. It depends on what kind of touring you want to do and how much you need to carry. Loading just the back only starts to be a problem if you’re carrying a lot of weight. One thing that you’ll really appreciate on a tour is a dorky handlebar bag. They’re incredibly handy.

              Keep that 520 for the rest of your life.

              Reply
              • baiskeli

                 /  April 16, 2012

                Also, make sure you have enough room for rear racks without heel strike (I suspect you do, because this seems to be only a problem on newer road bikes with shorter chain stays).

                Reply
                • It’s juuuuust enough space for the big Ortlieb bags. I use those for commuting all the time and I’ll hit them every once in a while. I could probably tweak the fittings on the bags to really keep them out of the way if it ever became a problem.

                  Reply
              • I’m definitely keeping it around. The only downside is that it’s built for 27″ wheels, so running 700c results in some awkward compromises. Sometime in the not too distant future I’m going to get some custom 27″ wheels with a 10-speed rear hub built up. And yes, I’m going to go for the 36-spoke models. This bike is never going to be a speed-demon, so I might as well make them as tough as possible.

                Reply
                • Ian

                   /  April 16, 2012

                  Don’t know if you’ve made up your mind, yet, but these are great touring-appropriate rims available in 27″:

                  http://www.velocityusa.com/default.asp?contentID=627

                  The Sun CR18 is still available in 27″, and it’s a good economical rim. Not sure what else is out there. I run 36-spoke wheels mostly, but to be honest I haven’t noticed much difference from 32-spoke wheels. They’re both very strong. If I didn’t already know what was on the bike, I wouldn’t be able to tell you from how they perform.

                  Reply
                  • The Sun CR-18s are what I was thinking about using. Right now I’m running older Bontrager Selects, which just have too low of a spoke count for me to want to carry a lot of stuff on it for an extended period of time.

                    Reply
                    • Ian

                       /  April 16, 2012

                      Can’t go wrong with the CR18. For me they’ve been a little fussier to build up, but the finished product is good. And you won’t be the one building them.

          • stephen matlock

             /  April 17, 2012

            I’ve thought about this – even though I’m 40 miles from work, I know there are die-hards out here. But it’s 30 miles of mountain biking (from 600 ‘ down to sea level, through 3 river valleys). I think I’d kill myself.

            Reply
      • baiskeli

         /  April 16, 2012

        I think the 105 hoods are similar to the Ultegra (I was also looking at a Cannondale Super Six with 105).

        There is an online chart that shows I’m not losing that much top end between a double and a compact (not that I’d ever be pushing 53×11 on anything other than a steep descent), but I’m gaining quite a bit on the low end (both from going to a compact and also going from 9-10 speed)
        http://home.earthlink.net/~mike.sherman/shift.html

        Reply
      • efgoldman

         /  April 16, 2012

        JD I’ve been saving this for you all weekend. A new cocktail.
        http://maddowblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/04/13/11187243-bacon-cocktail-need-i-say-more?lite

        Reply
      • Ian

         /  April 16, 2012

        When I started riding, 52-42 was a pretty standard double. Gah. 53-39 was an improvement, but 50-36 or 48-34 are far better for most people. I’ve actually got a 46-30 on my road bike now, and I love it. Only need to shift the front for big hills. Couldn’t keep up with a very strong group with that gearing, but I do most of my riding alone anyway.

        Reply
        • Right now I have a 50/34 hooked up to an 11/26 on my commuting bike. When the cassette wears out I think I’ll swap it out for an 11/28 or an 11/32. On that bike I’d rather have the low range, because I’m never actually going to use those small cogs.

          Reply
          • Ian

             /  April 16, 2012

            I’m the same way. The gearing on my road bike is 46/30 in front and 12-30 in back. I run out of gears when I want to accelerate into or keep my speed up after a steep downhill, but the trade-off is that I can climb anything, even crazy gravel roads, and I seldom need to shift the front. It’s an ideal gearing for long solo rides or non-competitive group rides.

            Reply
            • baiskeli

               /  April 16, 2012

              Does Alaska have a lot of steep roads/trails?

              Reply
              • Ian

                 /  April 16, 2012

                Sometimes it feels like that’s all we have. I rode up here from Washington State on 50-36 double, and that was a terrible, terrible mistake.

                Reply
                • baiskeli

                   /  April 16, 2012

                  Ouch!

                  I’m guessing the East Coast doesn’t have that many hills, there are a few (and of course the White Mountains), but it seems that other states (eg. Colorado, California) have actual mountains and long sustained climbs.

                  Other than the Six Gap Ride, I can’t think of a ride that gains more than 7000 – 8000 ft of climbing in 100 miles (and even that is a lot of up and down, rather than a long sustained climb, which is more difficult).

                  Not that the hills we have feel easy, I suspect it’s all relative, if you live in an area with big hills you just get better at it out of necessity.

                  Reply
                  • Ian

                     /  April 16, 2012

                    I don’t know. A lot of New England has one short, steep hill after another. It can be brutal.

                    Reply
                    • My friend rode across the country from Virginia to Washington (the stupid way to do it, from what I was told) and he mentioned that going over the Appalachians was actually harder than the Rockies, because the former don’t have as many switchbacks as the latter.

        • baiskeli

           /  April 16, 2012

          There is a long hill in Southern Vermont where I was cursing and offering my soul to the devil just to make it to the top. I had a double and 11-23 and ended up giving up and ignominously walking up the hill (and because I have cleats and it was steep, I had to take off my shoes to walk up and ended up burning the soles of my feet on the hot tarmac). So the devil declined my soul but had no problem taking my soles. I got a wider cassette after that experience (I think 12-27).

          But I guess it depends on the cyclist. On the wednesday hill repeats where I was grunting in 39×25 @65-75 rpm, there was a CAT 2 racer doing the whole thing in his big chain ring (53×25) as his lowest gear.
          http://assets3.ridewithgps.com/trips/589098

          My first road bike had a triple. The compact is pretty close to the triple in terms of utility.

          Reply
          • My brother used to be like that CAT-2 guy. He pretty much never got out of his big front ring and could put down so much torque that he stretched out a chain in a single season of riding.

            Reply
          • Ian

             /  April 16, 2012

            The compact double was a rare moment of sanity for the bike industry.

            Reply
            • Unless you’re riding competitively, a 53/39 just doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. I got through RAMROD on one, but I don’t think I’d want to do it that way again.

              Reply
              • baiskeli

                 /  April 16, 2012

                I’m actually going to race on this bike, and I raced a few years ago (only CAT5, which is the equivalent of a kiddie pool), but I saw quite a few compacts. I had a double at the time.

                Reply
    • Ian

       /  April 16, 2012

      We had insane weather this weekend. I think it almost got up to 60 yesterday. So much snow melted that it’s like a different landscape (one of my neighbors’ Halloween decorations have become visible again). So I got out on the roads for the first time since probably late October. Just did a 16-mile loop on my 35-lb commuter monster, but it felt really good. Hopefully I’ll have the road bike ready for next weekend.

      Glad you like your new bike. When you say the bars are narrow, how narrow are they? If they’re pretty normal, give it some time and see if you get used to it. I can ride anything from a 42-46 comfortably, but it feels weird when I switch.

      Reply
      • baiskeli

         /  April 16, 2012

        Today is the Boston Marathon and they’ve issued a heat advisory! Normally it’s freezing this early in spring. I was sweating riding into work, and we’re currently at 89F and will probably break 90F+

        I think the bars are pretty normal (I think 44) but I think I had 46 on my other bike. It’s not that bothersome, it just took some getting used to for the first few miles.

        Reply
    • Captain Button

       /  April 16, 2012

      I am riding a almost 30 year old bike* that I assume I will need to replace sometime in the next year or two. I have no idea what goes on in bike tech today.

      Though my one personal take is that being energy efficient is not a big factor for me, since I’m doing this for exercise, so wasting energy is the point.

      *Which admittedly spent most of that time sitting idle in the garage.

      Reply
      • baiskeli

         /  April 16, 2012

        Yeah, efficiency is over-rated, it’s getting out there and exercising/enjoying oneself that matters.

        I always have a tendency to be a numbers junkie but at the end of the day its the fun of being out riding on a nice day, the sights, the smells and the sounds that matter.

        Reply
      • Ian

         /  April 16, 2012

        That is one futuristic bike.

        Reply
      • Part of me still have a bit of bike envy when I see the shiny things coming out now, but then I remind myself that I own a bike that’s a decade old and still gets people riding up behind me to ask what it is.

        Reply
        • baiskeli

           /  April 16, 2012

          Nothing like a classic bike. I still get people asking me about my steel bike. I don’t really like the whole sloping top tube trend, so I’m glad this bikes top tube doesn’t slope that much (the steel bike has the classic horizontal top tube).

          One of the most beautiful bikes I’ve ever seen was a Peter Mooney lugged steel frame bike
          http://www.peter-mooney.com/

          Reply
            • baiskeli

               /  April 16, 2012

              OK. now that is cool!

              I think I’ve only ever seen one of those around here in all my years of riding.

              Reply
              • They used to be made by a company up in Bellingham, WA, so I think they’re a little more common around here. They’re utterly fantastic bikes, because you get almost zero vibration transmitted into your seat, but the rest of the frame is made from super-stiff aluminum. They were doing pretty well in the late-90s and early 2000s, but then the body that governs competitive triathalons declared that they weren’t bikes (no double triangle), and their customer base evaporated. They folded about five years ago, so now I’m stuck scrounging eBay for maintenance parts.

                Reply
          • Ian

             /  April 16, 2012

            That is a beautiful bike. I’ve always wanted one of these:

            http://www.jitensha.com/eng/nuebisupht_e.html

            I think that guy has his bikes built by Toei in Japan, who build bikes inspired by classic French designs. One of his all-rounders with fat 650B tires would be a perfect high performance bike for the gravel roads up here. Alas, not in my price range right now.

            Reply
      • Very fancy! I was all excited to ride to work today, then got downstairs to the bike room and had to inflate the tires, but then didn’t have enough CO2 to inflate both tires, so then I had to get in the car and drive to work, because I was already so late that I couldn’t walk. And now it’s too hot.

        Wow, that was seriously whiny. Sorry. What I meant to say was, “Cool bike, man! Hooray!”

        Reply
        • baiskeli

           /  April 16, 2012

          Thanks, and I feel some of your pain.

          I rode to work today on the new bike. 5 miles later, realized I’d left my saddle bag and CO2 cartridges. Turned back, went home to pick them, and then rode to work 8 miles turned into a 13 mile ride (but it’s so nice outside and I left early enough that I really didn’t mind)

          Reply
  8. Bookwoman

     /  April 16, 2012

    So, who watched Girls? I’m in the parental demographic, so of course I loved those scenes. The boys were pretty creepy, I have to say.

    Reply
  9. koolaide

     /  April 16, 2012

    Anyone watching the WNBA draft?

    Reply
    • koolaide

       /  April 16, 2012

      I <3 Rebecca Lobo.

      Reply
    • enstar

       /  April 16, 2012

      not watching it, but keeping an eye on the results. pleased to see the mercury picking up samantha prahalis, from ohio state–with penny taylor out, we’re gonna need some more players who can score from the mid and the outside.

      Reply
      • koolaide

         /  April 16, 2012

        Without Taylor, you could be lottery bound. Which, if the balls go your way could mean Griner — Diggins, EED aren’t bad consolation gifts, either.

        That Taylor injury hurts so much–no Olys & no WNBA season & no Turkish playoffs. I was watching the game where she was injured (the internet is an amazing thing) and everyone just knew. sigh.

        Reply
  10. chingona

     /  April 16, 2012

    The first post-Passover bagel is the best bagel of the whole year. Mmmmm …. chaaameeetz.

    Reply
    • I tried to spend at least one day in an entirely fruit-and-vegetable only mode, to (ahem) clear my system – but yeah.

      Chaaameeeetz!

      Reply
      • chingona

         /  April 16, 2012

        One of my Passover staples is a tabouli-like salad with quinoa instead of bulgar and lots and lots of parsley, mint, garlic, other raw vegetables. It’s so freakin’ good after several days of traditional, Ashkenazi food.

        But today, eating my lentils with spinach and ginger with rice and plain yoghurt, I realized just how exponentially I increase my suffering by not eating kitniyot.

        Also, beer.

        Reply
        • We do kitniyot – it’s saved me on more than one occasion.

          Sadly, we never drink beer. But that does mean more for you, should you come visit! The other 51 weeks of the year.

          Reply
  11. I wrote up a recipe for lime cordial, just in time for gimlet season:

    http://cocktailchem.blogspot.com/2012/04/homemade-lime-cordial.html

    Also, a review and history of the Q.B. Cooler, the inspiration for the Mai Tai:

    http://cocktailchem.blogspot.com/2012/04/tiki-classics-qb-cooler.html

    I actually got a lot of blogging done this weekend because my throat was feeling a little bit off, so unfortunately I stuck around my apartment a lot more than I would have liked given that it was sunny almost all of Saturday and Sunday. At least I did get out for a bike ride yesterday. I’m still bummed that I won’t be doing RAMROD this year, but not needing to train so hard is a weight off my mind. And lots of whisk(e)y reviews coming up once I get some more data (alas, I need to drink more often), as well as the usual tiki drinks and a long-winded post about how to make your own infusions (with actual chemistry).

    Reply
  12. dmf

     /  April 16, 2012

    Reply
  13. corkingiron

     /  April 16, 2012

    To be filed under news that is cool for me:

    I GET TO GO TO PARIS!!!

    Mrs. C. has had a paper accepted at some pointy-headed intellecshul conference there – so I get to “freeload” at the end of May – first week of June. I am coming to really like being a kept man…..and I think I have the talent for it as well.

    Reply
  14. stephen matlock

     /  April 16, 2012

    I have the entire week off. Taxes are going to be filed today. All’s right with the world.

    I SIMPLY MUST WORK ON THE NOVEL. Please don’t let me wander around the Internet today.

    Reply
  15. Over the weekend, we watched Holy Grail with the kids (forgot about that bit with the women trying to entrap whatshisname! Heh), and the husband taught the 8 1/2 year old girl to play Portal.

    Parenting!

    Reply
    • David L

       /  April 16, 2012

      In the words of the lolcats: Parenting. ur doin it… mostly rite, akshually.

      Reply
    • dmf

       /  April 16, 2012

      heh, just wait til you have the parent-teacher conference over the singing of always look on the bright side of life

      Reply
    • neighbors73

       /  April 16, 2012

      This weekend in parenting, The Neighbors clan had an Avengers movie marathon to prep for the upcoming film. We watched Iron Man, Captain American, Iron Man 2, and Thor on Saturday. Then, Sunday morning we watched The Hulk.

      It really was fun to introduce the boy to the fun of superhero flicks, and those are perfect for him. He’s 9, so he was able to get them without being too afraid of the violence, which he can be sensitive to. (we wouldn’t show him the Christian Bale Batman movies, for example).
      It was fun.

      Reply
    • Electronic_Neko

       /  April 16, 2012

      That was Galahad. I know because my own parents introduced me to that movie when I was too young to understand that scene, so I forgot about it. I was quite surprised by it when I watched the move again when I was older.

      Reply
    • baiskeli

       /  April 16, 2012

      Portal is all kinds of goodness. It’s time for me to get Portal 2

      Reply
    • enstar

       /  April 16, 2012

      just an fyi to all of the student lounge: i happen to still have a spare copy of portal 1 that i can gift somebody, if they should choose to want to play it. i also have the horror/suspense game “amnesia”, if that’s more of anyone’s fare.

      Reply
  16. caoil

     /  April 16, 2012

    I was bad and watched telly for most of yesterday. In my defense, the History Channel had a bunch of shows on about the Titanic, which were very interesting. Even though I did nod off during the ‘Nazi Titanic’ show. I know I asked on the FB group, but did anyone besides me watch the 4-part miniseries on Saturday night? I thought the technique of parallel stories in each episode was interesting.

    Reply
    • HEY – speaking of the FB group – can someone email or DM me w/ the secret details of Plummeting Sloath’s intl voyage? It’s killing me here.

      Reply
      • corkingiron

         /  April 16, 2012

        Well, he claims it’s a vacation in Thailand – but it’s got top-secret black ops written all over it if you ask me. I’m pretty sure the National Security people have quietly invaded the Horde because they’ve run out of ideas on how to make the world better – and they think we’re a gold mine.

        Reply
  17. JHarper2

     /  April 16, 2012

    Sometimes I look at the wedding announcements in the papers, just because it is so nice to see people embarking on an optimistic voyage together.
    This couple look so happy, look past their perfect teeth and see the joy and smiles in their eyes.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/15/fashion/weddings/elizabeth-chuck-lucien-noel-jr-weddings.html?_r=1&ref=weddings

    However this woman:
    Can you say overachiever? And she’s probably nice too

    Dr. Sufrin, 37, is keeping her name. She is an obstetrician-gynecologist at San Francisco General Hospital and a Ph.D. candidate in medical anthropology at the University of California, San Francisco. She also works as a women’s health specialist at the San Francisco County Jails, providing clinical care to female inmates and conducting research to improve women’s access to reproductive health care.

    She graduated summa cum laude from Amherst College. She also received a master’s degree in anthropology from Harvard and a medical degree from Johns Hopkins University.

    Reply
    • Holy crap.

      I’m, um, taking a class on education in museums?

      Somehow not the same.

      Reply
    • Bookwoman

       /  April 16, 2012

      Wedding sections are sometimes called “the sports page for women”, but the NYT wedding section is the sports page for upper-middle class New Yorkers.

      Reply
      • JHarper2

         /  April 16, 2012

        Not quite my demographic, but it is interesting to see what people get together and what people put announcements in the times.

        Last week, a descendent of the founder of the King Ranch of Texas married the son of a family that owns farms in the midwest. They married on the front lawn of the ranch and all I could think of was this:

        Reply
        • SWNC

           /  April 16, 2012

          “The farmer should be sociable with the cowboy/
          When he rides by and asks for food and water/
          Don’t treat him like a louse, make him welcome in your house/
          (But be sure that you lock up your wife and daughter!)”

          Reply
      • koolaide

         /  April 16, 2012

        So is the current scare story for “news” outlets the brides-to-be-use-feeding-tubes a real thing or just one or two individuals being highlighted to gin up page views and faux outrage?

        Reply
        • Bookwoman

           /  April 16, 2012

          Oy. That was a classic Thursday Style section faux-trend piece. Feeding tubes? Seriously? I weep for my gender.

          Reply
        • lasslisa

           /  April 16, 2012

          Two people. And one of them was inspired by the other.

          Not that I even saw this article but I have been absolutely surrounded by weddings lately and that’s something that – well, most of my friends are ‘normal’, meaning not desperate housewives-to-be of anywhere, and not only can I not imagine anyone doing this – I can’t imagine anyone even talking about it with a straight face. Losing weight? Plastic surgery? OK, I can imagine someone admitting to it or talking about it as a serious option. Feeding tubes, no.

          I.e., pretty sure you’ve been had.

          Reply
    • SWNC

       /  April 16, 2012

      I make really good chocolate cake. And I’m great at Trivial Pursuit. And sometimes I remember my friends’ birthdays.

      Yeah, I got nothing on Dr. Sufrin.

      Reply
      • SWNC

         /  April 16, 2012

        Oh, oh! And I know all the words to the songs in Oklahoma!

        Reply
        • aaron singer

           /  April 16, 2012

          Whenever I hear the name of the state, my mind automatically thinks, “…Where the wind comes sweeping down the plains…”

          Reply
    • I once read a wedding announcement of a woman with my own name. It weirded me out, then I got jealous of “my” three-week Italian honeymoon. I considered cutting it out and sending it to my mom, since it’s the only wedding announcement she’s ever going to get, but then though better of it.

      I wonder if I’m still happily married?

      Reply
  18. David L

     /  April 16, 2012

    I am annoyed at technology for making me out of touch. My DVR has suddenly decided that it won’t record two shows on season passes at the same time if there’s another airing somewhere on the schedule. Since I have a bunch of broadcast TV set to record on Sunday evenings, that means that GoT isn’t recorded until the late airing, which runs past my bedtime, so now I’m behind on the show that everyone is talking about.

    I’m not really spoiler-averse (and it’s impossible with a show with that much buzz anyway, especially with the Renly/Loras plot, since the gay blogosphere seems to have a habit of treating any male/male intimacy on TV as if it was some sort of momentous occasion and not something that happens on a semi-regular basis these days), but I hate being late to the conversation.

    Reply
  19. efgoldman

     /  April 16, 2012

    Aaargh. This is my state rep!
    Stands no chance of passing, but still.
    Yes, I already sent her an email nastygram, reminding her that this isn’t AZ or AL or VA.

    Reply
  20. JHarper2

     /  April 16, 2012

    Oh yeah, on Saturday night I watched some great hockey. Not the NHL playoffs, but the women’s world hockey finals. The players were just so fast and skilled. In the overtime (of course it went to overtime) Canada scored to steal a game from a team that was I think faster and a bit better. I don’t know if it was broadcast in the United States, but if it was not, men, women and girls in the US missed something that would have opened eyes.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/hockey/canada-defeats-us-for-womens-world-hockey-crown/article2402832/

    and this:
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/facts-and-arguments/the-essay/i-was-the-only-girl-on-a-boys-hockey-team/article2260788/page2/

    Reply
    • caoil

       /  April 16, 2012

      I wish I’d remembered to watch! I only caught a bit of the Canada-Finland game last week. And I see from the G&M related stories that Switzerland took bronze? Wow! Good for them! I am waiting for the day when Finland is a serious contender for the gold – they’ve come so far in the past few years.

      Reply
    • I don’t think that airs in the States :( On the other hand, I saw most of the Caps/Bruins game Saturday evening. A goaltending clinic. Very nice. Esp. when every time I turned on the Pens/Flyers game, they were fighting.

      Reply
      • aaron singer

         /  April 16, 2012

        The Blackhawks are driving me crazy:
        Game 1, tie it up with 14 seconds left, lose in OT.
        Game 2, tie it up with 5 seconds left, win in OT.

        As the Canucks are my least favorite team in all of sports, I love seeing them down 3-0.

        Reply
  21. Neocortex

     /  April 16, 2012

    There was some crazy action here yesterday when several queer/queer-ally and antifascist groups (including Occupy Boston’s Queer Direct Action working group and friends) counterprotested a Tea Party rally at which two of the speakers were leaders of SPLC-recognized anti-LBGT hate groups (and one of whom is directly linked to the Uganda “Kill the Gays” bill).

    Daily Kos has a writeup.

    Photographer Paul Weiskel has a bunch of pictures up, including pictures of arrests (all the arrests were of our side), police choking a protester (also discussed in the Daily Kos article), police trying to seize his camera, police shoving people, Tea Partiers with Confederate flags, and more.

    Back2Stonewall also has two writeups. Unfortunately, I think they messed up pronouns in both posts – A, the choking victim, is genderqueer/trans and used neutral pronouns last time I asked.

    I was with the second wave of people and showed up right after the choking incident happened (the choking victim is someone that I know and work with at OB, so this is distressing on a personal level). I personally saw police shoving our people for no reason except that they happened to be nearby during an arrest and blocking our people from marching around the gazebo with a banner. I also saw a Tea Partier grab and yank on one of our banners and start a brief fracas. But oddly, in a situation where some of those present were from hate groups, most of the escalation that I saw was from the BPD, which had SWAT and officers in action gear there as well as officers in normal uniforms.

    Reply
  22. efgoldman

     /  April 16, 2012

    Its always the Jooz!

    Hollywood screenwriter Joe Eszterhas is accusing Mel Gibson, his recent collaborator on a movie about Jewish revolt, of “hating Jews” and using him to deflect his anti-Semitic reputation.

    In an explosive nine-page letter to Gibson obtained by TheWrap (read the full letter here), the screenwriter wrote that the director of “The Passion of the Christ” never intended to make the movie about Jewish heroism, called “The Maccabees.”

    http://www.thewrap.com/movies/article/joe-eszterhas-explodes-mel-gibson-you-hate-jews-36957?page=0,0

    Reply
    • baiskeli

       /  April 16, 2012

      Saying Mel Gibson is anti-semitic is like saying the sky is blue.

      Reply
  23. SWNC

     /  April 16, 2012

    This weekend, the spouse and I retreated to a tiny cabin halfway up the side of a mountain. I love directions that say, “Continue on for x.x miles beyond the end of the paved road.”

    I was reminded yet again that I never feel so safe and at home as when I’m surrounded by green mountains on all sides. I didn’t grow up in the mountains, but nowhere else in the world feels as right to me. My mother-in-law, on the other hand, feels hemmed in by mountains. She needs the wide open spaces of the beach where she grew up.

    So where’s your safe place, Horde?

    Reply
    • caoil

       /  April 16, 2012

      Forest. And a mountain range. I would go stir-crazy if I lived in the prairies again.

      Reply
    • JHarper2

       /  April 16, 2012

      My grandparents lived in a narrow pass in the western mountains. The pass was very deep, and it got dark early. The next town over had been buried in the early 1900’s when the top of a mountain had fallen off, crossed the valley and rolled up the other side burying half the town under hundreds of thousands of tonnes of rock. The mountains are not my happy place. I like a spot where the horizon can be seen all around and it is far away. The broad plains for me where I was brought up. Once I was coming home from a winter in BC in a wide valley. I sat up in the front of the bus, waiting for the moment when we came down out of the mountains onto the plain. Just as we started our descent, the sun rose in the east lighting up the whole plain. It was gorgeous.

      That and a prairie lake, there is a spot in Manitoba where the extended family has had a cottage for generations.

      Reply
      • SWNC

         /  April 16, 2012

        I’ve never been to the prairie, but when we took a trip to the Southwest, this: “a spot where the horizon can be seen all around and it is far away” made me surprisingly uncomfortable. I felt very vulnerable and exposed in a visceral way. It was beautiful, but it was such an alien beauty to me.

        Reply
        • R_Bargis

           /  April 16, 2012

          Same here, what with the being from West Virginia and all. I don’t like really tall and steep mountains like the Rockies either, but being out on the prairie makes me feel very exposed. A nice hill on either side is good – you know where you are.

          Reply
    • corkingiron

       /  April 16, 2012

      Lots of trees and the ocean nearby. So I can hear the sound of the wind in the trees, and the endless sighing of the ocean.

      Which is to say, right here where I is.

      Reply
    • intangir

       /  April 16, 2012

      Totally feel the same way about mountains, I’m not sure there’s any place I’d rather be than spending a perfect peaceful snowy evening in the mountains (except perhaps on the ski slope the next morning!). Having lived most of my life in the midwest though I sometimes wonder if it’s just novelty and that if I ever did move in/near mountains that their current mystique and beauty would wear off. I hope it wouldn’t though, and I hope I can actually move there sometime and find out.

      Reply
      • SWNC

         /  April 16, 2012

        I’ve lived in the mountains for a good 14 years now, and they’re still just as beautiful to me. I think sometimes a place just calls to you.

        Reply
        • intangir

           /  April 16, 2012

          Glad to hear it! My mother’s family is from Colorado and I have been fortunate enough to visit there pretty regularly (including working a YMCA camp there for a summer) and really hope to be able to move there someday.

          Reply
    • David L

       /  April 16, 2012

      I’m not sure that I really have a terrain that counts as home to me. Growing up right on the line between the Texas Hill Country and the Coastal Plain, home is when I can see the hills on the horizon or when I can see the flatlands on the horizon, depending on what direction I’m coming from.

      I do have a certain affinity for rolling hills, though. I think I’d rather have that as my view than actual mountains.

      Reply
    • Bookwoman

       /  April 16, 2012

      Cape Cod. But not on the beach, because there’s all that sun and nasty sand (to quote Woody Allen, I don’t tan, I stroke.) The ponds, the woods, the smell of the air…it’s the most relaxing place I’ve ever been.

      Reply
      • efgoldman

         /  April 16, 2012

        …most relaxing place I’ve ever been.
        Well, the most relaxing place I’ve ever been was the lodge where we stayed at Grand Canyon National Park. But I couldn’t live there. I’m a city guy. Boston. NY. SanFrancisco. Like that.
        Although its not so necessary now that we have these here toobz.
        Living now in a generic suburb that’s outside of, but not really attached to, Providence RI. Not crazy about it, but we chose it because its ten minutes from my work.

        Reply
        • Bookwoman

           /  April 16, 2012

          Yeah, I couldn’t live on the Cape year-round. I love my own suburban backyard, especially since we bought a house last year that the previous owners had lanscaped spectacularly well. But proximity to cities is vital. God bless Amtrak.

          Reply
    • I grew up in a small town on the shores of Lake Michigan, and then moved to a small city on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. Now I live a half hour drive from the former, and of course hours by plane from the latter, and it still just feels all wrong to not have a huge body of water just down the street.

      Reply
      • chingona

         /  April 16, 2012

        Did it mess you up at first to have the water on the other side? Or are you from the Michigan side?

        In a weird way, though there is no big body of water in Tucson, it messed me up to move from Chicago to Tucson because Chicago is hemmed in on the east and stretches to the west, while Tucson is hemmed in on the west (Tucson mountains, county open space stretching to Saguaro National Park – basically straight open desert) and stretches to the east. For the first few years, I kept messing up my east and west.

        Reply
        • The small town is Lake Bluff, Illinois, to the north of Chicago – so it TOTALLY messed me up to have the Sea on the wrong side! I spent 14 years thinking “East. No, it’s always the opposite of what I think, so that must be… West.” 14 years.

          Reply
  24. efgoldman

     /  April 16, 2012

    I may have posted this last week, in which case sorry for the duplication, but we’ve got to warn everybody!

    Rather than dying out in the dimly lit aftermath of a ginormous asteroid impact, dinosaurs on Earth may have instead spread to other planets and built a terrifying space-conquering empire.

    Organic chemistry expert Prof Ronald Breslow has suggested from new research into DNA that the Jurassic Park monsters may in fact be living in highly evolved civilisations on other worlds – quite possibly with their own interstellar exploration programmes.

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/04/12/alien_dinosaurs/

    Reply
    • Ah, The Register. Lots of fun.

      Reply
    • Just goes to show that you can hold some pretty whacky ideas and still get published in JACS.

      Reply
    • intangir

       /  April 16, 2012

      So Calvin may have been right after all – the Tyrannosaurs in F14s are coming!
      [embed]http://i426.photobucket.com/albums/pp348/RedLanternKonan/Comics/tyrannosaurus_in_f-14s.jpg[/embed]

      Reply
      • intangir

         /  April 16, 2012

        Whoops – totally messed that link up. I blame dinosaur sabotage.

        Reply
    • baiskeli

       /  April 16, 2012

      There is a really terrific sci-fi novella called Think like a Dinosaur by James Patrick Kelly that is so apropos right now.

      Reply
  25. 5 years today. 32 people, a lot of them students, 18 and 19 and 20 years old. We said, you know, maybe we should stop letting the gun lobby write the laws and actually take gun control seriously as a citizenry. They said the answer to this problem is more guns in more hands. And they did just that. What’s the end-point of that strategy? Well, a few weeks ago a kid was killed for holding a bag of Skittles. He was killed because the person on the other end of that confrontation took very seriously the idea that the answer to our problem is more guns. That is not an accident. That is the plan working as advertised. Their answer? More guns, of course.

    We fight a lot of battles. Maybe we even fight more important ones. But save some of your money, and some of your time, for this battle too. The forces arrayed behind the NRA on the other side, they have taken control of the issue completely. Lawmakers no longer write the laws, gun “rights” organizations do. Things have to change.

    Reply
    • intangir

       /  April 16, 2012

      More guns is apparently Newt Gingrich’s answer – he actually thinks the NRA is too timid and we should extend the 2nd amendment to the entire world:
      http://www.politico.com//blogs/burns-haberman/2012/04/newt-nra-is-too-timid-120482.html
      This was of course met with a standing ovation.

      Reply
    • Ian

       /  April 16, 2012

      Thank you. It’s nice that Corey Booker is using some of his hero-capital to talk about guns, but we need more people with the courage to do that. Where I live, even the Democrats have to do a campaign photoshoot with some guns. It’s disgusting. I don’t understand why this is such a losing battle when we know, beyond any doubt, that easy access to guns results in more gun deaths. We can talk about cigarettes, we can talk about drunk driving, we can talk about diet and exercise, but we can’t talk about deadly weapons in the hands of whoever wants them whenever they want them.

      Reply
      • efgoldman

         /  April 16, 2012

        Because there are enough people out there who are askeered of their own shadows, and think (and vote) with their lizard brains.

        Reply
    • corkingiron

       /  April 16, 2012

      Kudos Craig – an excellent way to honor their memory.

      Reply
    • R_Bargis

       /  April 16, 2012

      I’m a member of the NRA (my liberal father in law got me a membership for Christmas so I can go to the really nice NRA range for cheap) and my last issue of American Hunter had an article about how it’s imperative to strike down the draconian, freedom-ruining law in Virginia that… restricts people to buying one handgun a month*. I kind of doubt restricting people to buying one handgun a month does much good to lower gun violence, but that does not count as a draconian law. The fliers we get in the mail from them are, like the article points out, completely out of touch in reality – “It’s 2012 and ALL OUR FREEDOMS ARE ON THE LINE”.

      *the last issue was also released before the Trayvon Martin was shot and there were several articles on how important it is to pass stand your ground laws that are even more depressing to read in retrospect.

      Reply
    • Ian

       /  April 16, 2012

      FYI, Coates has an open thread up now, if you want to post this there.

      Reply
  26. baiskeli

     /  April 16, 2012

    Listening to NPR On Point program on the Zimmerman arrest, if I had a cookie for every person who called in to bellingerently claim that Trayvon Martin’s death nothing to do with race! or reverse racism I could be the second coming of the cookie monster.

    Props to the caller (Not!) (everyone is making it about race!!) who immediately called after the 68 year old African American gentleman describing how his dad abandoned his business in the South to move his whole family North to avoid jim crow, racism and desegregation and why the South’s history cannot be discounted.

    And kudos to the genius who called and said that 90% of crime against whites is done by blacks (and when challenged by the host, got all Check the FBI statistics!!!)

    Uuuugh!!!!

    Reply
    • Neocortex

       /  April 16, 2012

      Were there also people trying to claim that race can’t have anything to do with it because Zimmerman is (half) Latino?

      It seems to be news to a lot of people that you can be mixed-race or non-white and still harbor racist feelings toward black people* (and then, of course, there’s the whole point that it’s not just about Zimmerman, it’s about how the police department, which probably has officers of various races and ethnicities, handled the whole thing, and how that likely has something to do with race).

      *Do these same people also think that, say, gay men can’t be lesbophobic, or gay people can’t be biphobic, or LBG people can’t be transphobic? Or that women can’t be misogynistic? Or that Jews can’t be Islamophobic, or Muslims anti-Semitic? Or that deaf people can’t be bigoted toward blind people (my Deaf friend who attends a Deaf university and has close blind and deafblind friends there has interesting rants about this)? Wait, don’t answer that.

      Reply
  27. Electronic_Neko

     /  April 16, 2012

    I am trying to avoid eating any milk products for the next two-weeks. Last summer, I had a positive reaction to milk on a scratch-test. The docotor told me that since I don’t have a noticeable reaction to eating cheese/yogurt/etc., I could continue to eat them as long as I continuted to tolerate them well. I’ve been really annoyingly congested lately, and it occured to me that my daily yogurt might be causing more problems than I realized. So I’m trying an elimination diet.

    It is not going well. MILK IS HIDING IN EVERYTHING! It’s day one, and I have already been sabotaged by my Kashi bar. I assumed they were safe, so I didn’t read the label before eating it. Now that I have, I discovered that it contains whey protein. Argh!!

    I knew that milk ingredients could turn up in unexpected places, but granola bars were not high on my list of suspects.

    Reply
    • chingona

       /  April 16, 2012

      I had a friend who didn’t have a dairy allergy herself but whose nursing baby had a violent reaction whenever she ate anything with even the smallest amount of dairy – like your granola bars.

      Looking for things labeled Kosher Parve might help you when picking processed products. Good luck.

      Reply
      • Electronic_Neko

         /  April 16, 2012

        That must have been scary for your friend! I read some accounts about infants with milk allergies when I was researching, and it sounded just awful. Milk allergies are surprisingly common in kids. I hope your friend’s child outgrows the allergy.

        Reply
  28. OMG OMG OMG!

    Look at Jake Gyllenhaal being so fucking adorbs I literally got chills just from watching it! http://emilylhauserinmyhead.wordpress.com/2012/04/16/dear-jake-gyllenhaal-pleasepleaseplease-come-to-my-fantasy-seder/

    Reply
  29. efgoldman

     /  April 16, 2012

    Mr. Pierce addresses the matter of Mrs. Romney (or: wish I’d said that!).

    What we have now is a process by which Ann can do the work of humanizing the Romneybot while being utterly bulletproof herself. And, well, I choose not to be part of it. I am glad that Ann Romney has horses to help her course of therapy for her multiple sclerosis. I also know that there are women out there with MS who can barely afford canes, and can’t afford the drug therapies at all, and that her husband’s plans for the national health-care system will make the lives of those women worse, and not better, so if she’s coming out as a combination of Ma Ingalls and Maria Goretti, I reserve the right for very specific personal reasons to call bullshit on this as loudly as I can.

    http://www.esquire.com/blogs/politics/romney-family-wealth-8135649

    Reply

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