And open thread for the chattering hordes.

You know what to do! And if you don’t, here’s what you do:

Talk about whatever you want, with the lovely people who gather here to do that now and then, when our usual open thread locale (Ta-Nehisi Coates’s blog) isn’t open. Most of us are members of the community that started over there, but feel free to jump in, regardless!

Standard FYI clause: My rule of thumb is that I wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

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149 Comments

  1. David L

     /  April 11, 2012

    I asked this on Twitter, and I’ll ask it here: Is it just me or does “Reince Preibus” sound more like it should be the name of a GoT character than the name of a real person?

    • intangir

       /  April 11, 2012

      All hail Reince Preibus, The First of His Name, King of the Andals, The Royhnar, and the First Men, Lord of the Seven Kingdoms, and Protector of the Realm!

      Yeah, I’d say that fits pretty well.

  2. Well, as Charles Pierce is wont to note, Reince Preibus must be an anagram.

    • helensprogeny

       /  April 11, 2012

      It almost sounds like whoever named him was drunk and possibly slurring their words.

  3. This bothers me on so many different levels:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17664075

    Teachers and administrators shouldn’t be turning to the criminal justice system to handle minor infractions. If nothing else, it makes them look personally weak, which is just going to make the problem worse.

    • aaron singer

       /  April 11, 2012

      It is a bad sign. But what to do when an administrator tells a teacher that she basically can’t do anything against a student acting out, because that student’s family has sued the school and the district? What to do when there is little to no discipline that a teacher or a school can enact against a student who continuously disrupts a classroom?

  4. caoil

     /  April 11, 2012

    Oh goodness, people! I have found my future (weekend breakfast), and it is this:

    http://smittenkitchen.com/2011/05/creme-brulee-french-toasts/

    I may not survive the caloric intake, but I probably won’t care.

    • Ow, my arteries!

      • chingona

         /  April 11, 2012

        Rather late in the gefilte fish discussion yesterday, as it drifted into other Jewish food territory, I mentioned a New York-style deli near my work that offers a pastrami sandwich with two latkes for “bread.” I get chest pain just thinking about it.

        • Jesus, that is horrid. Our people looked at the McGriddle and said, we need to get ourselves some of that action.

        • efgoldman

           /  April 11, 2012

          ….a pastrami sandwich with two latkes for “bread.”
          When I was a kid, growing up in Coolidge Corner (Brookline, MA), Jack and Marion’s deli on Harvard Street offered several sanwdwiches like that. I’ve seen them elsewhere, too.

          • chingona

             /  April 11, 2012

            Do you know anything about a chop suey burger? My grandfather will fondly reminisce about getting these from street vendors growing up in Brighton Beach. It was chop suey on a hamburger bun.

            • efgoldman

               /  April 11, 2012

              Do you know anything about a chop suey burger?
              I’m guessing it was a local phenomenon. I’ve never been to that end of Brooklyn.

          • aaron singer

             /  April 11, 2012

            It reminds me somewhat of a jibarito, which can be found in a Puerto Rican neighborhood in Chicago; it’s a sandwich in which the “bread” is fried plaintains.

      • caoil

         /  April 11, 2012

        But, YUM, in the meantime.
        I just wish I understood what ‘heavy cream’ is – it’s in so many things, and I can never figure out what I’m supposed to get from the grocery store. Full-fat cream? Devon cream?

        • Bookwoman

           /  April 11, 2012

          In the supermarket, it’s usually labeled as heavy cream or whipping cream: it’s the full-fat stuff.

        • chingona

           /  April 11, 2012

          I think it’s the same thing as whipping cream.

          • caoil

             /  April 11, 2012

            Ah…that may help. Thanks, both of you! (nothing is ever actually labelled ‘heavy cream’ up here)

            • I inadvertently bought the “light” (only 18% cream!) for the cake I was making to bring to the Seder and thought: Huh! Well, it’ll be lighter, then!

              And lo, come to learn for the first time in my life that “light cream” doesn’t whip up. Husband made a Panic Run to the grocery store, and bless him for it.

              • snailspace

                 /  April 11, 2012

                Did that for Thanksgiving once. We had frothy cream poured over pumpkin pie. Not quite the effect we were going for.

                • Indeed, I can imagine not!

                  (In an aside: I wonder how many years will have to pass in American discourse before I can again hear the word “frothy” and not be entirely skeeved out…)

                  • All of them, hopefully. That’s just a gross word, like moist.

                    • Bookwoman

                       /  April 11, 2012

                      A good friend of mine in college *hated* the word moist. We used to tease him by using it as often as possible.

                      Not that we would ever do that to you, of course.

                    • Best appended to names like Von Lipwig, I’m sure.

                    • Ian

                       /  April 11, 2012

                      Sometimes you have to say “moist.” As in, “I’m just going to moisten this bread with a little mayonnaise.”

                    • efgoldman

                       /  April 11, 2012

                      Aaargh. Too close to the margins to start a mayonnaise flame war.

                  • helensprogeny

                     /  April 11, 2012

                    The damage Santorum has done. It’s not just about having to wash sheets.

          • Dex

             /  April 11, 2012

            Generally speaking in the US, something labeled whipping cream refers to the lighter version, with 30% or so butter fat content (up to 36, but generally closer to 30, as butter fat is generally the most valuable ingredient in milk). Heavy cream, or heavy whipping cream tends to have 36% or more butter fat. At the end of the day, more fat means that it will whip up more quickly and hold its body better (i.e., it won’t got flat and watery/separate on you if you let it sit for an hour or so). Flavor-wise, regular and heavy whipping creams will taste similar, but then again not, because the mouth feel will be completely different once whipped. While in London for Christmas this year, we made some desserts and had whipped cream as a topping. We made it with what’s called double cream there. It’s 48% butter fat and a completely different animal, and actually pretty difficult to find here in the US. It whips to stiff peaks in little more than ten seconds with a mixer. I could probably whip it to stiff peaks with a hand whisk in about thirty. The consistency ends up being closer to, say, buttercream frosting (which is a completely different animal, but many are familiar with it).

            Random unsolicited tips: to whip cream, colder is always better. Many people put their beaters and bowl in the freezer for several minutes prior to beating the cream. I tend to whip ours using nested stainless bowls, putting ice and water in the outside bowl to keep everything extra cold.

            Almost the opposite is true for egg whites: room temperature is always best, and fat is the enemy. Any type of oil or grease will make it difficult or impossible to whip egg whites.

            • Bookwoman

               /  April 11, 2012

              And copper bowls are especially good for beating egg whites, yes? Something about copper ions?

              • Dex

                 /  April 11, 2012

                Yeah, although they are prohibitively expensive. These days, most all recipes compensate for the general lack of copper in the home kitchen by including a smidge of cream of tartar. The biggest benefit of copper is some protection against over-beating.

                I was laughing awhile back when McMegan was gushing about a copper stock pot for soups give me a copper bowl, a copper saucier, and then I’ll use the change to buy a stainless stock pots and get a good start on my future kids’ college funds.

  5. R_Bargis

     /  April 11, 2012

    It’s my busy day at work so I won’t be able to respond till 6 pm EST but I could use some car advice.

    My car is a 2001 Chevy Cavalier with 42k miles on it. It was given to me for $10 in August 2010 by an elderly friend from church who had to give up driving. Yesterday I took it to my spouse’s mechanic, whom he trusts, for an embarrassingly overdue oil chance and general inspection. They called me back to say that the car is in good order except for needing new brake pads… and a serious structural problem that makes the car unsafe to drive, namely the sub frame (the part of the car that holds the engine, among other things, in place) is unusually corroded and rusted, and the engine might fall out of the car if I hit a good pothole at speed (they send some alarming photos of the rust damage). The mechanic thinks I got a lemon frame, or maybe 12 years of being parked outside and never washed in the salt air got to the car.

    At any rate all the repairs to make it safe to drive will be $1900. The car is worth $1300, and it could be that I go for another 2 or 3 years without needing to put a lot of money into it because the engine and transmission are in good shape — or I might need to put another 1k into it in a year. Buying another car isn’t an option – I don’t actually need a car at the moment, and the only reason I have one is because it was a gift, my grandparents help me with the insurance, and I limit myself to filling up the tank once every 3 weeks. I can get along without one for a few years, at which point my spouse’s car will have 100,000 miles on it, so I could take that car and help him buy a newer one. On the other hand, I’ll really miss the convenience of a car, especially when winter comes and I don’t want to walk/bike to my evening job in the cold and dark.

    What do y’all think? Get rid of the car, or take my chances and get it fixed? I’ve more or less made up my mind to rid of the car, so I could also use some suggestions on how to get the most money out of selling it.

    • stephen matlock

       /  April 11, 2012

      I feel your pain. I’ve had two cars with significant repair bills that were close to or exceeded the “value” of the car.

      Could you get a comparable car for $1900? If you sold your car as-is, you might get very little based upon it’s current condition (near value-less, as anyone who bought it would likely need to do the same repair).

      In your case, it sounds like junking the car is an option. You might see if you can sell it for parts, but it might be a case where you just need to either junk it or donate it. (If the car really isn’t safe to drive, it doesn’t sound like it’d be a good idea to sell it to someone who’d want to drive it, right? But then, there are those who might like to have a car they can fix up, perhaps for reasons of nostalgia.)

      I’ve had great luck on Craiglist for cars, and so-so luck from dealers. What I’ve learned is, before I buy, I take the car to my mechanic for a look-over.

      • R_Bargis

         /  April 11, 2012

        Any used car worth $2000 isn’t going to be in much better shape than my current one, and will certainly have far more miles on it.

        I think I’ll pick it up from the shop, carefully drive it the 1/4 mile home, and post it for sale on craigslist for $500 OBO with an explanation of what’s wrong, and see if anyone bites. If not, I’ll see about selling it for parts since the engine and transmission are fine.

  6. Can someone point me at a conservative blog somewhere that says “Derb was a known racist for decades, and the fact that TNR kept him on for so long makes us look bad”? I’m sure it’s out there.

    • stephen matlock

       /  April 11, 2012

      It might require some work. My own experience with conservatives is that they endure a lot of racism as just background noise.

  7. chingona

     /  April 11, 2012

    This may have been discussed already in another OT, as I haven’t been able to participate in every thread recently, but I’ve been wondering about what makes political or social comments “too far.” I’m thinking of Limbaugh and Derbyshire. Don’t get me wrong. Derbyshire’s last, infamous piece was exceedingly vile. However, he been an open and apologetic racist for years, and the stuff he’s written about women is downright misogynistic and very dehumanizing. Given that this is basically what he does – what he’s been paid to do for years – what made this last piece the one that broke the camel’s back? Or in the case of Limbaugh, I don’t even think his Sandra Fluke/slut comments were the worst thing he ever said. I thought his comments about Chelsea Clinton were worse because she was a kid who did nothing wrong except have famous parents. But he continued for many years after that without the kind of reaction that the slut comments generated.

    Or is the difference the ability to mobilize and target outrage via the Internet and social media, not the comments themselves? Thoughts?

    • chingona

       /  April 11, 2012

      That should be *un*apologetic racist. D’oh!

    • It’s a generational change. Millenials as a generation are very diverse and they’re pretty progressive and they want their institutions to reflect those things. They don’t appreciate that stuff and they’re perfectly happy to form an angry mob to stop it. It’s the Hufflepuff generation.

    • dave in texas

       /  April 11, 2012

      Along with what dawnoleary said about generational change, I think it may have to do with the long and ugly accumulation of misogyny and bigotry. Kind of an “at long last, sir, have you no decency” kind of thing.

      • David L

         /  April 11, 2012

        I kind of admired the NR editor’s explanation for its honestly, for bringing that sort of thing up. Something along the lines of “Sure, he’s been a racist for a long time, but this is too blatant and ugly to ignore.”

  8. efgoldman

     /  April 11, 2012

    Hope all the folks in Tennesee are proud…

    Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam on Tuesday refused to sign a bill that would permit discussion of creationism in classrooms alongside the traditional evolutionary-based explanation of the origins of life, but allowed it to become law anyway.

    I bet the paperwork for the federal lawsuit will be filed by Monday.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/04/11/us-usa-education-tennessee-idUSBRE83A00720120411

  9. http://anibundel.wordpress.com/

    Disney princesses as real people.
    GoT renewed for a third season!
    Katniss Barbie bothers me.
    Another week of The Voice!

    • SWNC

       /  April 11, 2012

      I’ve been trying to teach the sprout that while it’s fun to be the princess for a little while, it’s better to be the queen.

    • Lizzou

       /  April 11, 2012

      I just discovered the work of this Finnish lady last week. Same idea, as in, portraits of Disney princesses.

      http://jirkavinse.wordpress.com/

  10. Is there any better way to gauge the cyclic passing of the seasons than to keep track of Sully’s periodic defenses of/videos featuring the author of The Bell Curve? It definitely feels like spring today.

    • Bookwoman

       /  April 11, 2012

      Well at least he (Murray) admits to a change of heart about marriage equality. But The Bell Curve is COMPLETELY EMPIRICALLY RIGHT.

      Oy.

      • See: Today’s post about bigotry being lies….

      • baiskeli

         /  April 11, 2012

        The funny thing is that at root Charles Murray and John Derbyshire are saying exactly the same thing, only Derbyshire was not smart enough to couch it in scholarly language. The last chapter of “The Bell Curve”, where the authors talk about a ‘high tech reservation’ for the low IQ amongst us (with most minorities being dropped in that group) is something Derbyshire would probably have a wet dream about.

        • Dex

           /  April 11, 2012

          The most troubling thing about all of this is how very indignant Mr. Sullivan gets when people politely debate his humanity as a homosexual and yet he is unable to internalize that he is doing the very same thing to people of color.

    • Ian

       /  April 11, 2012

      Monday I grilled for the first time since last fall. Yesterday the first geese arrived in town. And now this!

    • I mentioned this before, but when I saw Charles Murray on Colbert recently I was quietly appalled.

    • efgoldman

       /  April 11, 2012

      Is there any better way to gauge the cyclic passing of the seasons…
      I dunno’. I much prefer waiting for the robins and the daffodils and the start of baseball season. Much, much less agita-making.

  11. chingona

     /  April 11, 2012

    And now for something completely different …

    This morning I was sitting in on a panel discussion while I waited to interview one of the panelists afterword. Every time this particular panelist mentioned a female politician he admired, he would mention how “pretty,” “lovely,” “well put together,” etc., she was. I found myself increasingly self-conscious about what he would think of my appearance when I interviewed him. Which, yeah, is kind of dumb of me, but it’s also why constant comments from men about women’s appearance in contexts in which it’s not relevant contributes to a pretty toxic social environment.

    • efgoldman

       /  April 11, 2012

      You should have picked your wardrobe from your laundry hamper.

      • chingona

         /  April 11, 2012

        The sweater did come from the hamper. I did not see any noticeable snot stains on the shoulders from my little one. It was washed in the recent past. I did not wash my hair this morning, but I only wash it every other day anway.

  12. Having a small meltdown.
    My Outdoor One, the fluffy marshmallow kitty, did not come home for breakfast.
    I don’t know what to do. She ALWAYS comes home for breakfast.

    • Ian

       /  April 11, 2012

      Oh, that’s nerve-wracking. Put out some very strong smelling food and then just start walking around the neighborhood looking. If she doesn’t turn up in a couple of hours, call your local shelter and see if she’s down there. If you haven’t seen her by dinner time, put up some signs and and post something on Craigslist.

      It’s possible that she’s been hurt in a fight or by a car and is nursing her wounds. If there are natural hiding places you can think of, check those out. We had a cat go missing for six weeks once (seriously, six weeks), and she turned up half-starved but okay in the neighborhood woods.

      • I did the first part this morning before I left for work, walking the neighborhood with a cup of dry food rattling and calling her name. Nothing.
        Then I had to go to work.
        I really don’t want to be here. I’m not focused, and I’m seriously considering cutting out at 3pm to go home and look again. The natural hiding spot is the wood directly in back of us, which i didn’t have time to search this morning.
        I didn’t think to call the Fairfax shelter, partly because it’s so far from us….like miles down the parkway far. if she’s not home when I get home, and I do find her huddled down int he wood behind the house, I’ll call them.

        • Ian

           /  April 11, 2012

          I’d say cut out early if you can. You might find her, and you’ll feel better having tried.

        • Ian

           /  April 11, 2012

          Also, definitely put out some delicious bait. An open can of tuna or something. Spread the juice around a little.

          • She hates wet food.

            • Ian

               /  April 11, 2012

              There must be something strong-smelling that the cat likes to eat. Tuna, raw fish, cream, uncooked cube steaks. Bowl of blood. Something.

              • I put out a cup of dry food. Boy is FatOne put out there’s a cup of food he can see out in the patio, but cannot get to.

    • Oh no!

    • chingona

       /  April 11, 2012

      Sending best wishes for your kitty.

    • Hang in there. Good thoughts for the kitty, that she finds her way home soon. Maybe she just got distracted by a bird or something.

      • caoil

         /  April 11, 2012

        Or maybe a nice neighbour took her in temporarily (saw her outside/thought she might be lost/etc).

        • scone

           /  April 11, 2012

          Or she got stuck in somebody’s garage and it closed after her? I think that has happened to one of my cats.

    • SWNC

       /  April 11, 2012

      Fingers crossed for you.

      Last summer, one of our cats (both cats are indoors) ran outside and stayed gone for a week. We checked the shelter regularly, put up signs around the neighborhood and kept leaving food out on the porch. When we’d just about given up hope, she appeared one evening, meowing at the front door and looking entirely too pleased with herself.

      • helensprogeny

         /  April 11, 2012

        OMG, I would have killed her on the spot! I WORRIED over you!! And you’re out having fun! (Sooo glad it turned out okay.)

    • doginajacket

       /  April 11, 2012

      So sorry! Sending best wishes. Seconding what Ian said. Is she microchipped? The company that issued our puppy’s chip lets you print out ready made “missing” posters from their website.

      • Yes! Yes she is chipped.

        • doginajacket

           /  April 11, 2012

          Go ahead & notify the chip company that she’s missing. If they’re like mine they may even send out e-mail/text alerts to their customers near you that there’s a lost cat they should watch for.

    • Fingers firmly crossed, sweetie. Let us know!

    • scone

       /  April 11, 2012

      Oh no! I would put up signs. One of my childhood cats got lost several years ago, and my dad hung up “Lost Cat” signs. He came home to an entertaining series of calls “This is John from 1908 Whatever Street, and I think your cat is in my backyard.” “This is Mary, at 1912 Whatever Street, and my son just told me there was a grey cat in our backyard.” “This is James, at 1914 Whatever Street, and I think my dogs have treed your cat in our backyard. I’m going to bring them inside.” It warmed my heart that all those people were looking out for our kitty.

    • baiskeli

       /  April 11, 2012

      Sorry to hear that.

      Hang in there, sending best wishes for you and your kitty.

    • helensprogeny

       /  April 11, 2012

      Libations made to appropriate cat-gods. Blessings on you and your kitty. Also fingers crossed.

  13. efgoldman

     /  April 11, 2012

    Adam Kilgore at Washington Monthly

    At about this time in nearly every presidential cycle, you start hearing that Jews are going to leave the Democratic column in significant numbers either because a Democratic administration is insufficiently supportive of Israel or a Republican administration is all warm and cozy with Israeli leaders…..
    By and large, though, the Jewish vote has been reasonably stable, with Democrats typically winning two-thirds to three-fourths of it.

    http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/political-animal-a/2012_04/time_once_again_to_explode_myt036619.php

    • I’m curious to see how long this Mole thing lasts.

    • Bookwoman

       /  April 11, 2012

      Here’s my favorite bit: “I think the big division in our society is always black-nonblack. The other stuff—Hispanics, Asians—is a bagatelle by comparison. This makes sense paleoanthropologically, too: Homo sap. first left Africa, then differentiated into other races.”

      You truly could not make this stuff up.

      • Well…you can make it up. That’s what Derb did. He has something like a 3 year-old’s understanding of how human evolution worked.

    • koolaide

       /  April 11, 2012

      So here’s my question about the Derbyshire thing. What about the editor that greenlighted his last piece? What’s going on in quality control editing that allows that piece to be published? If it’s a fire-able offence for the writer, then why was it published. Do they really publish w/o reading? I doubt it.

      • Bookwoman

         /  April 11, 2012

        It wasn’t published in National Review, but on the Taki Mag website, which is not known for its quality control.

        We at Taki’s Magazine take our politics like we take life—lightly. We believe political labels such as conservative and liberal are as outdated as flared trousers and Nazis. Ideology is a false god, a secular religion that seeks vainly to create a paradise on Earth. Our only ideology is to be against the junk culture foisted upon us and mirages of a new world order. Think of us what you will, but read us. Our writers are never boring.

      • chingona

         /  April 11, 2012

        It was published on a blog called Taki. He was fired from National Review. Different publications.

        • koolaide

           /  April 11, 2012

          Ah. Thanks to both of you.

        • stephen matlock

           /  April 11, 2012

          Taki himself used to be published by NR. (I had a subscription for a long, long time…)

          It takes NR quite some time to divest itself of the crazies. Joe Sobran eventually got kicked out, but they never (to my knowledge) ever kicked Pat Buchanan out.

  14. WashPo is reporting they’re about to charge Zimmerman. FINALLY.

    • Here’s hoping they can actually find him to arrest him.

      And to take Mr Pierce’s suggestion – depose Sean Hannity. That could be amusing.

    • Electronic_Neko

       /  April 11, 2012

      Well, since his attorneys implied he’s mentally unstable and has left Florida when they abandoned ship, perhaps the prosecutor is worried that if she doesn’t charge him and get him in custody, she won’t be able to do it later.

      sidenote: my goodness, that guy in the foreground of the photo on the WAPO article is striking!

  15. cofax

     /  April 11, 2012

    So I went to see The Hunger Games on Sunday, and the shaky-cam technique made me so motion-sick I had to leave the theater 2/3 of the way through. Argh.

    In other news, I have caught up on Fringe and decided that Anna Torv is the best actress currently working on network television. Or at least, she’s getting the best opportunities to show her chops, given the various characters she’s been able to play over the last few years. She’s just fantastic.

  16. dmf

     /  April 11, 2012

    • Ok, that was delightful! Thank you, d!

      • dmf

         /  April 11, 2012

        my pleasure, what a sense of joy eh? makes me think about trying to learn to play the guitar for the 10th or 11th time..
        hey my auto-spell-checker seems have left me in these kinds of comment spaces does anyone have fix for that?

        • Dex

           /  April 11, 2012

          Hey, that’s the guy from the Playing for Change videos! That guy’s voice is absolutely unbelievable.

  17. caoil

     /  April 11, 2012

    I am partway through reading ‘Medical Apartheid’ by Harriet Washington, and it is breaking my heart. I’m alternating between sadness and red-eyed fury that makes me want to find the graves of these doctors and reanimate them just so I can punch them in all kinds of sensitive areas. Gyne surgery without any anaesthetic, J.M. Sims? Oh, your karmic debt better have come to get you.
    What’s interesting, if I may use the term rather loosely, is related to Emily’s post from today – the lies these doctors/researchers told themselves and each other to make this unbelievable cruelty ‘acceptable’.

  18. Ian

     /  April 11, 2012

    This is kind of a cool thing. An earthquake generates different kinds of waves that travel in different ways and at different speeds. The Love wave is a surface wave that causes horizontal earth movement and comes along after the P-wave and the S-wave. Anyway, the Love wave from this morning’s 8.6 appears to have triggered at least two earthquakes in Alaska. Looking at the waveforms on our stations, you can see the very faint, low amplitude arrival of the Love wave suddenly overwhelmed by the dense waveforms of a local P-wave. It happens twice: Once in the far Aleutians (a 5.4, 22 minutes after the 8.6) and eleven minutes later in central Alaska (a 3.8, which woke me up).

    • David L

       /  April 11, 2012

      On the subject of things caused by earthquakes, I saw a link to this video the other day showing how the Oaxaca quake shook up the underground aquifer that feeds Devil’s Hole in Death Valley, and what that causes in the hole itself. Pretty cool, at least for nerdy old me.

  19. scone

     /  April 11, 2012

    First, to tempt everyone in: Johnny Cash and a kitten! http://i.imgur.com/PlkdL.jpg

    Secondly, a request. I recently joined Weight Watchers for the very first time. I’ve really never attempted to diet (except for a terrible year of lightweigh crew my freshman year of college losing weight that didn’t really need to go), I eat relatively healthily (though I do love pasta and chocolate) and I’m moderately active.

    But I haven’t been all that happy with how I looked for a while and really, my pants were starting not to fit, and I needed something to kickstart me in the right direction in a healthy way. I am loving WW – I’ve already lost pounds and inches, and have not actually needed to change much of *what* I’m eating – I just had to pay attention to how much of it I was eating – not to mention maybe cutting out having a cookie EVERY day at lunch.

    As I said above, I’m usually moderately active: I walk, I jog (veeeeery slowly), I bike, and I do some yoga. But I broke my toe (through clumsiness) and now I can’t do ANY of those things! Well, I can walk. REALLY SLOWLY. Otherwise, I can’t put any pressure on the stupid toe. For four weeks! Argh. I am super annoyed.

    It’s incredibly frustrating to me that just as I’m really getting into the weight loss program, all of my activity is off limits. I’ve got some free weights at home of different weights, and I’ve been doing arm weights, but I seem to only be able to do that for about 20 minutes before I get really bored. I’m also planning on trying pilates (from on-demand videos) as most of that seems to be done while lying down.

    Anybody have any other suggestions for exercise that doesn’t put pressure on a foot? (We have a pool, but it doesn’t open until Memorial Day, by which time I’ll be back on the move.)

    • A bike, preferably stationary. The pressure will be on the ball or heel of your foot rather than the toe.

      • scone

         /  April 11, 2012

        I’m in a walking boot, which I think makes the bike a bit harder. (And more annoyingly, just a week or so ago I gave up my gym membership because it was nice outside and I prefer to work out outside as long as it’s not too gross. Bad timing. I may have to re-sign up.)

    • koolaide

       /  April 11, 2012

      walking handstands? (ducks)

      But seriously, shadow boxing as you sit in your chair might add a different arm-only activity that’s more cardio than the weights. I’ve done the “can I fake hit the talking head on the commercial” thing before. I should do it more b/c I’ve gotten way too sedentary.

      • scone

         /  April 11, 2012

        I like the shadow boxing idea! At the very least, I can mix that in with my weights for variety (and cardio!)

    • stephen matlock

       /  April 11, 2012

      I feel your pain – literally. I started back in physical exercise last year, then I broke my ankle. It has never healed right, and running is now out of the question, as is anything like hiking. Even taking stairs is still quite painful.

      Per Gonzai55 – would a stationary bike work? Check with your doctor/therapist.

  20. Ian

     /  April 11, 2012

    Weirdly enough, I rowed on a broken toe my senior year and it didn’t cause any additional pain. I could hardly walk, but rowing and erging did not affect the toe. I suspect that cycling would have been okay, too. This is assuming footwear that doesn’t put pressure on the gigantic fucking broken toe.

    • Ian

       /  April 11, 2012

      Meant as a reply to scone. I make this same mistake at least once in every one of Emily’s open threads.

    • scone

       /  April 11, 2012

      I actually went for a bike ride immediately after breaking the toe (assumed it wasn’t broken) and it hurt more when I got back. Probably a mistake. I’m in a walking boot that doesn’t allow me to bend my foot at all. (So, thinking about how much your foot bends at the catch, I’m not sure erging is a good idea – though my dad actually has an erg at home…) I do think I may be able to bike so long as I keep the middle of my foot (in the boot) on the pedal, but I’m going to wait a week or two.

      • Ian

         /  April 11, 2012

        The walking boot complicates things. My toes were just taped together. How long is it on for? You could always do hands-only drills. Really get that draw in good shape. (For the non-rowers out there, this would be unbearably boring.)

        • scone

           /  April 11, 2012

          Heh. Arms-only used to be the bane of my existence. (Okay, one of the banes. The tanks were also hateful.)

          • Ian

             /  April 11, 2012

            My coach accidentally destroyed one of Yale’s tanks (they let us use them at strange hours) by knocking the mirror into the water, whereupon it got sucked into the motor. I did not feel bad about it.

            Arms-only is bad, but it was legs-only that really drove me insane. It’s almost impossible to keep a boat set rowing legs-only, and coach made us do it once for 45 minutes straight in chop.

            • scone

               /  April 11, 2012

              Oh Jesus, I’d totally forgotten how awful legs-only is. Just blocked it out. Presumably you were also having to keep the blades square? What a nightmare. (Actually, I’m just trying to make this conversation as unreadable as possible for the non-rower)

              • scone

                 /  April 11, 2012

                Side note: I also rowed in high school, and among my group of friends, the nonrowers always tried to make sure they had a significant majority in conversations, because we rowers were always capable of turning any conversation to crew if just a few of us were put in the same room.

                • Ian

                   /  April 11, 2012

                  Heh. Wasn’t so much of an issue in college because nobody else was awake when we were.

              • Ian

                 /  April 11, 2012

                Yes. Legs only, squared blades, in wind and chop. Like a shambling zombie caricature crew. Why not just say on land and beat us with the oars?

  21. SWNC

     /  April 11, 2012

    Hey, kids! Anybody familiar with Richmond, Virginia? I am looking for a good brunch place that can accommodate a group of 14 to 20.

    Any advice much appreciated.

    • scone

       /  April 11, 2012

      Am not from there, but my sources recommend Strawberry Street Cafe.

    • I am somewhat familiar, but never brunched there. I’m honestly used to seeing the town while inebriated and in the back of a pickup. When in rome and all.

  22. dmf

     /  April 11, 2012

  23. No sign of Mitzi. Printer at home is crap at pictures, so no “lost” signs until i go into the office tomorrow. I keep thinking maybe she’ll show up any minute….

    • and I was so distracted I shut the fatOne in the basement because i didn’t realise he followed me down there. He nearly took the hinges off trying to headbutt it open.

      It opens inward, natch.

      • doginajacket

         /  April 11, 2012

        I’m keeping my fingers crossed for you to find her soon!

  24. David L

     /  April 11, 2012

    Just watched and joined in people standing for 40+ minutes in the Texas sun watching the funeral procession for an Austin police officer who was killed in the line of duty. Pretty proud of my hometown today.

  25. LizR

     /  April 11, 2012

    So, I was catching up on the latest trayvon martin thread after being at work all evening, and sophistry is back. He’s pretty far down the page, posting as sophistry3. I flagged all of his comments, but if anyone else sees this it might help the khan out to go over there and do the same. I think he’s more likely to see things if multiple people flag stuff.

  26. stephen matlock

     /  April 11, 2012

    …and TheAtlantic.com seems to be down – can’t access the site at all.

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