You get an open thread, you get an open thread, everybody gets an open thread!

You know what to do! And if you don’t, here’s what you do:

Talk about whatever you want, with the lovely people who gather here to do that now and then, when our usual open thread locale (Ta-Nehisi Coates’s blog) isn’t open. Most of us are members of the community that started over there, but feel free to jump in, regardless!

Standard FYI clause: My rule of thumb is that I wait for 2 hours after Ta-Nehisi would usually open a thread (roughly noon, EST), and if none is forthcoming, I put one up here.

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248 Comments

  1. Captain Button

     /  March 2, 2012

    It seems I have been using the wrong kind of cinnamon all these years.

    Curse you Food Network! I was happy in my benighted ignorance!

    • Bookwoman

       /  March 2, 2012

      Is this like using the wrong kind of salt? Can most people really tell the difference?

      *is happy in her ignorance*

      • All salt is sea salt. Therefore there is no such thing as the wrong salt.

        • Bookwoman

           /  March 2, 2012

          Oh good, because I read about “fleur de sel” and maldon salt and pink salt and grey salt and…oy. I have one container of large-grain kosher salt, and one of plain old Morton’s. 99% of the time I use the latter.

      • WAKnight

         /  March 2, 2012

        No, different species of spice go by ‘cinnamon,’ so they are different things.

      • Dex

         /  March 2, 2012

        Food nerd here:

        Flavor-wise, you generally cannot tell the difference if the salt has been mixed into ingredients and then cooked. That said, if it’s used as a garnish, many if not most people can at least discern, if not outright taste the difference between some salts. (I’m going to leave KCl to the side, as that’s a different animal). Some unrefined salts have significant impurities that can change both color and taste/smell (e.g., iron can turn salt reddish and lends a metallic flavor). You mention Kosher salt below and while it has the largely the same chemical composition as regular table salt, it reads differently on the tongue because of texture and particle size. Since the grains of Kosher salt are big, they will tend to present to a taster more as individual, identifiable bursts of saltiness, whereas table salt is fine enough that it gives more of a general increase in overall saltiness.

        The other thing to keep in mind is that a given measure of Kosher salt will have less salt than the same volume of table salt. This is because table salt’s crystals/particles are smaller than are Kosher salt’s and thus there is less air in the table salt. What this means is that if you are doing something that requires precise ratios (e.g., some baked goods), you should use ~40% more volume of Kosher salt than you would table salt.

        • Bookwoman

           /  March 2, 2012

          “Since the grains of Kosher salt are big, they will tend to present to a taster more as individual, identifiable bursts of saltiness,”

          Yes. I’ve only used it to sprinkle on top of things.

          Thanks for all of that – very interesting and informative.

        • Captain Button

           /  March 2, 2012

          The other thing to keep in mind is that a given measure of Kosher salt will have less salt than the same volume of table salt.

          Physics Nerd here:

          This is why you usually find the coarse grains of stuff at the top and the fine powder at the bottom. The fine grains take up more of the space and thus are functionally denser than the coarse grains. And the lowest energy state is with the denser material at the bottom, so things tend to move in that direction.

          The phrase to search on is “packing fraction”.

    • SWNC

       /  March 2, 2012

      I’m pretending that I never heard that either. I’m happy with my plain old not really cinnamon.

    • Do you like the taste of it? Then you’re using the right kind.

        • Ian

           /  March 2, 2012

          I don’t know. In the Korean drama “Gourmet,” using the wrong salt almost brings down the restaurant.

      • watson42

         /  March 2, 2012

        This talk of cinnamon has me craving apple pie. Maybe I need to make one…mmmm…pie…

  2. caoil

     /  March 2, 2012

    I managed to finish uploading another of the zip files last night, so now I have the next set of links for anyone who is interested – contributors have already had their links emailed to them, these are just for the Horde generally if they want to have a listen.

    http://www.filefactory.com/file/c34d6cd/n/JH_Files_Part_1.zip

    http://www.filefactory.com/file/c33144b/n/JH_Files_Part_2.zip

    I’ll also repost in a full OTAN in case there are people who don’t make it over here to the Lounge.

  3. Project Runway recap. Last night they combined by two favroite things. Lighting and fashion.

    http://anibundel.wordpress.com/2012/03/02/project-runway-all-stars-avante-garde-light/

    Also, the American idol Top 13 were established last night, which means we’re down to 10 good contestants, one who’s in due to pandering and one that’s in because he has really pretty hair.

    http://anibundel.wordpress.com/2012/03/02/american-idol-11-semi-finals-resultstop-13-revealed/

    And I hope you guys like my Milan reviews. They’ll run through to weekend, and end on Sunday. Depending on how many lines there are in Paris worth reviewing those reviews start mid next week some time….

  4. caoil

     /  March 2, 2012

    Also. I signed the ThinkProgress petition (managed to catch the link before it disappeared from your twitter feed box up there). I shake my fist angrily on behalf of my American sisters!

    • Look! Here it is again! http://thinkprogress.org/stand-with-sandra-fluke-s/

      I give and I give….

      (Am I the only one currently trying to cook up a way to get Rush Limbaugh to insult me egregiously so that maybe POTUS will call?)

      • caoil

         /  March 2, 2012

        Well, I know I’m not…though I’m sure being a heathen socialist queer Canadian would certainly give Limbaugh lots of ammunition to say something

        • Darth Thulhu

           /  March 2, 2012

          Canadian!?!? The potential insults are limitless:

          “Forget you, you beaver-loving, hockey-worshipping syrup-guzzler!”

          “Back to your igloo, you flannel-wearing, excessively-apologetic curling enthusiast!”

          (I apologize for these hurtful hypotheticals)

          • caoil

             /  March 2, 2012

            ;-p
            (I stopped wearing flannel long ago – it’s too warm!)

          • Um…isn’t being called Canadian enough of an insult already?

            /ducks and runs away

          • Captain_Button

             /  March 2, 2012

            As per the documentary Canadian Bacon you are legally required to post those insults in both French and English.

            • Ian

               /  March 2, 2012

              Hoseur.

            • Dex

               /  March 2, 2012

              True story: when I moved to the US, my best friends gave me a copy of Canadian Bacon so that I “would not forget my heritage.” I gotta say, living in the US, the movie is HILARIOUS to me, because the movie is jam-packed with subtle and overt jabs at Canadian culture that not only Americans, but Canadians as well, are unaware of. (e.g., the scene by the CN Tower where the Americans are plowing through the crowd and hitting everyone from behind, but the Canadians are all saying “excuse me” and and “sorry!”)

              • watson42

                 /  March 2, 2012

                I love love love Canadian Bacon. Having lived in WNY/on the Niagara Frontier (not to mention once dated a lovely man from TO), I laugh out loud every single time I watch that movie, it’s so true to…life?

                • Dex

                   /  March 2, 2012

                  My favorite scene is the jail scene. So much awesome:

                  “Thank you for sleeping so quietly. I love you, even though you’re a criminal.”

                  “This man was arrested for being in too many bad moods.”

                  • watson42

                     /  March 2, 2012

                    It would be near impossible for me to pick out my favorite scene. So much of the movie is so pitch-perfect.

                    I don’t know what it is with the Horde lately and some sort of odd harmonic convergence, but I was just thinking yesterday that I needed to check and see if this movie was on Netflix.

              • caoil

                 /  March 2, 2012

                Do you know, I’ve never actually watched that movie.

                • watson42

                   /  March 2, 2012

                  I always wonder if it would be funny to people who haven’t lived on the US/CAN border. I don’t think I know anyone who hasn’t lived on the border who has watched the movie. But I think it’s hilarious.

            • Darth Thulhu

               /  March 2, 2012

              you are legally required to post those insults in both French and English.

              Mais oui!

              Va te faire foutre, vous castor aimante, goinfre de sirop de hockey-culte!

              Retour à votre igloo, vous portez en flanelle, trop apologétique passionné de curling!

    • Electronic.Neko

       /  March 2, 2012

      Thanks for this! I don’t say this type of thing often, since I feel it is worthwhile to cultivate civility towards people I dislike, but I truly think that Rush Limbaugh is a BAD PERSON, without redeeming qualities.

  5. Why are Stephen Colbert and Rick Santorum such different people? Or rather, how is it that Colbert plays the part and Santorum is the real thing?

    • Last night people on twitter were grumbling that we needed a judge on Idol who had “authenticity” and “wasn’t afraid to say what he thought.” Therefore I suggested Santourm.

    • SWNC

       /  March 2, 2012

      I was actually thinking the other night about how they both seem to be truly sincere about their Catholic faith, but in such very, very different ways.

    • intangir

       /  March 2, 2012

      Maybe it’s like some bizarre variation of Poe’s law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poe's_law) where the existence of an exaggerated parody calls into being the thing itself.

    • aaron singer

       /  March 2, 2012

      Only one of them teaches at a Catholic sunday school…

      • Somehow I can guess which one. The one who tries to give back to his community, right?

        • aaron singer

           /  March 2, 2012

          I wonder about his family’s history, as from what I understand they’re a very wealthy family in South Carolina that goes back a long ways.

          It reminds me of a roommate of mine in college, whose family dates back several hundred years in South Carolina and were originally French Huguenots (though at some point along the way I think they became Catholic). Anyways, the family was basically landed gentry in the state; when Giuliani ran for Governor, my former roommate’s uncle was his campaign director for SC. He was removed from that position when he was arrested with possession of a controlled substance (cocaine) with intent to distribute.

          I’ve always wondered if the two families knew each other, I’ve always assumed so. I want to say that the Colberts had the reputation of being “city folk” (as much as you can be in Charleston, anyway) and a little more liberal than their rural/plantation counterparts.

          • I was just reading on Wikipedia that his wife’s father belongs to a well-known Charleston law firm, which I assume means wealthy.

        • taylor16

           /  March 2, 2012

          Oh, come on … Santorum gives back to his community. He goes around telling them how wrong an immoral they all are for everything they do!

    • Captain_Button

       /  March 2, 2012

      Maybe there was a transporter accident?

      • wearyvoter

         /  March 2, 2012

        With Santorum as the feral side of Kirk?

  6. WAKnight

     /  March 2, 2012

    I am home sick today, so I am reading in bed. For Christmas my wife gave me Ernest Duvergier de Hauranne’s “A Frenchman in Lincoln’s America.” It is a self-conscious civil-war era sequeal to Tocqueville, and it is amazing (thus far) and I heartily recommend it to the Civil War Horde.

  7. WAKnight

     /  March 2, 2012

    Also, blog flogging:

    My spouse continues the wedding narrative: http://testudomeles.blogspot.com/2012/03/our-wedding-part-ii-philosophy.html

    I write about why a civil war buff and reenactor like myself doesn’t reenact the civil war: http://testudomeles.blogspot.com/2012/03/why-i-dont-dress-up-like-confederate.html

    • Captain Button

       /  March 2, 2012

      Thanks for the latter.

      Geek that I am, I am reminded of The Colonel’s Tiger one of the sharecropped stories in Larry Niven’s Man-Kzin wars section of Known Space.

      The world is a terribly nice place with peace and plenty for all. History has been extensively edited for the greater good.

      A historian investigates a historical anomaly that suggests there was warfare in the 19th century when he knows that such anti-social behavior was unknown after the 1400s.

      He mentions in passing the mid-20th century craze for very large team sports, culminating in the truely huge Winter Olympics events of the early 1940s.

  8. I’m going to take advantage of the embed capabilities here to embed this, because I am 6.

    • Saxophone. The one instrument that truly has no place in rock n’ roll.

      • YOU DO NOT IMPUGN CLARENCE CLEMMONS. Apologise at once madam.

      • Sexy 80’s sax occupies a unique place in my life, in that it is the thing that falls closest to the midpoint of the line graph that diagrams things Craig enjoys ironically and things Craig enjoys unironically.

        Mesmerizing.

        • Ian

           /  March 2, 2012

          Every time I see that guy I wonder if he consciously thought about Fela when he decided to play saxophone shirtlessly.

        • Now I wish I’d included Tears for Fears “Saxophones as Opiates” as one of the songs for JHarper.

      • SWNC

         /  March 2, 2012

        You know I love you, but you are wrong, my friend. Horn sections make everything better.

        • Ah, I see! You’re confusing “horn sections” with “chocolate.”

        • Ian

           /  March 2, 2012

          Two different things. Al Green needs a horn section to punctuate his discourses on, for example, being a ram. The horn section gives texture and reinforcement to his speech. Glen Frey needs a saxophone solo to say what he cannot. He fears he has not persuaded us that we belong to the city, so he asks the saxophone to say it again in language we will understand.

          • And we do! We do belong there!

          • caoil

             /  March 2, 2012

            I laughed, I really did.

            And then I was sad, because you reminded me of a song I’d rather forget.

            • Ian

               /  March 2, 2012

              “I’m a Ram” is a great song!

              • caoil

                 /  March 2, 2012

                I meant the Glen Frey thing! *shudder*

                • Ian

                   /  March 2, 2012

                  (I know! I was giving you a hard time for no reason!)

                  • caoil

                     /  March 2, 2012

                    Phew! I’ve never heard that Al Green song so I can’t offer any kind of opinion on it.

        • (Also, note that Ian is right – they’re two different things. I don’t mind horn sections, and often quite like them. It’s the 80s sax solo that has me lunging for the pre-programmed buttons on my car radio).

      • WAKnight

         /  March 2, 2012

        Dear Emily, I will always defend you, but The Stooges, the Pop Group and others would like to have a word with you.

        Like seriously man, Fun House.

        • WAKnight

           /  March 2, 2012

          Or heck, Hawkwind. Though I guess most of what this illustrates is that sax is often best used not as a precision instrument, but for wild cacaphony of the sort that proto-punk bands revelled in.

    • Bookwoman

       /  March 2, 2012

      Well that was a trip down memory lane. Thank you…I think.

    • Dex

       /  March 2, 2012

      I think you meant to post this video instead:

      • Dex

         /  March 2, 2012

        Yeah, I apparently don’t know how to embed videos here. :(

        • Fixt!

          Just drop the URL straight in. It’s magical!

          • Dex

             /  March 2, 2012

            I like magic.

          • watson42

             /  March 2, 2012

            Hey, do you know if/how I can embed a photo? Thx!

            • Not sure. I’mma try something, and then we’ll both find out if I’m right!

            • Nope. Didn’t work.

              Because I have the keys to the machine, when I want to post an image, I can do it through the edit function on the dashboard. (I try to do that for people who have posted links, because it’s always more fun to actually see the picture, but when I’ve got a lot of work, I might miss something). That produces something that looks like: {img [URL] /} (with carrots instead of fancy brackets). I tried to reproduce that in a comment box directly, and it didn’t work.

              WordPress bloggers – any help?

      • Love it, of course. We could also use some Epic Sax Guy.

      • Ian

         /  March 2, 2012

        Just before Christmas we were at the grocery store and there was this high school kid with a trumpet walking around playing the Careless Whisper hook over and over and over and over. Pretty sure it was a diversion for shoplifting pals.

    • mythopoeia

       /  March 3, 2012
  9. Friday question:
    Can someone please make me laugh?

  10. taylor16

     /  March 2, 2012

    Yayyy! Unlike at TNC’s, I can comment here from my phone while I’m in the car! (No, I am not driving… :)

    I’m on my way to Michigan for my best friend’s brother’s funeral. I expect it will be a sad weekend, but hopefully I can offset the sadness by a few hours with my family and some other friends.

    The trip has been somewhat eventful thus far…we wound up having to stop in a Steak and Shake parking lot outside of Indy for 20 minutes while a freakishly strong hailstorm blew through. At one point, we had trouble seeing out of the windshield because the hail was coming down so hard. It was a little unnerving.

    Anyway, that’s the worst we’ve seen…but I hear its worse further south. Here’s hoping that any of you who are down there are safe…

    • Dex

       /  March 2, 2012

      Safe travels!

    • I thought you said “Steak and Snake.”

      • Bookwoman

         /  March 2, 2012

        Hailstorm? Snakes? The Apocalypse is upon us!

        • taylor16

           /  March 2, 2012

          At one point during the hailstorm I said to my husband, “if a locust lands on our windshield, I’m grabbing the dogs and running for it.”

          No idea where safety from the Apocalypse would lie, but I’m thinking not at the southside Steak and Shake. :)

          • Dex

             /  March 2, 2012

            The hail storm just hit our place. I guess it’s moving quickly.

            • taylor16

               /  March 2, 2012

              In Chicago? That must be a new one, unless weather is moving west now…

              Although I look forward to seeing another hailstorm tonight in Detroit, apparently. Yippee…

              • Dex

                 /  March 2, 2012

                It’s sort of moving NNE right now in our area (we often get snow after more easterly parts of Indiana because of the lake), but you’re right: looking at the map now, it looks like we’re catching a second wave of a larger front that you hit earlier.

            • Huh! I’m almost exactly due west of you, and we got no hail! Weather gods. They’re weird!

      • Captain Button

         /  March 2, 2012

        The Chicken Fried Snake is to die for!

    • socioprof

       /  March 2, 2012

      I’m also hoping that you stay safe and that you can provide some comfort for your friend and her family.

  11. Dex

     /  March 2, 2012

    Ok. Nobody asked my opinion on this, but here’s what I think (I always waffle on whether to address a post like this to our fearless leader, or to the crowd reading along):

    I think that our wonderful hostess and her blog here are their own thing and separate, although quite connected, to TNC. I feel like neither TNC, nor most any of us would object to her having her own open threads whenever she pleases, regardless of what TNC does, posting-wise.

    Emily I can totally understand if you want to limit your moderating burden, but at the same time, it feels like you are serious about building up this blog and this community, and I think you should be, if I may say, selfish in that pursuit.

    • Nobody asked you but…
      ……anywhere there is I can flog my blog and not be banned for it is a great idea!

      /selfishpigthoughts

    • You are very sweet and very kind! xo!

      Here’s the truth: When TNC is on full-throttle, this place has tumble-weeds. Or, at least, any open threads do.

      And I really, truly am ok with that. There’s a much MUCH broader audience over there, and all the amenities that a big site can bring. It’s all good, baby!

      • Ian

         /  March 2, 2012

        I do like your open threads more, though. They’re quieter, if that makes sense, and I like that there’s no like button.

        • taylor16

           /  March 2, 2012

          I do miss the like button because I do like to give credit for a good joke or whatever.

          But I like it over here as well. I feel a little more comfortable talking about personal stuff since it’s a little quieter and the crowd is mainly the regulars.

          Either way, I’m sure there will be a lot of opportunity for the audience here to grow in the next few weeks as TNC takes a break.

          • Ian

             /  March 2, 2012

            I use the hell out of the disqus like button, but it’s so much pressure. Should I like it? I can’t like everything I like. Am I biased in my giving of likes? Doesn’t socioprof have enough likes already?

      • I like this place. I can be myself.

    • SWNC

       /  March 2, 2012

      Hear, hear!

      • corkingiron

         /  March 2, 2012

        “Doesn’t socioprof have enough likes already?”. Not even close to enough.

        • socioprof

           /  March 2, 2012

          I know who my true north of the border friends are now.
          /haughty sniff

          • corkingiron

             /  March 2, 2012

            “like”. You had me at “haughty”.

    • corkingiron

       /  March 2, 2012

      Yes. You have peeled back the many layers of obfuscation, and revealed a gleaming nugget of internet truth.

      Also too: I like the word obfuscation. It should be an architectural term.

      • aaron singer

         /  March 2, 2012

        Trouble is, you would only have part of a building, and never the whole thing.

    • Dana Sterling

       /  March 2, 2012

      yes yes!

  12. selenesmom

     /  March 2, 2012

    Folks, I don’t usually talk about my adventures in job hunting here because I am too proud. But I think maybe this is so far off the beaten track that prospective employers cannot Google me. And if they do, well, too bad.

    A few weeks ago, Mr. Selenesmom and I panicked. He persuaded me to put together a version of my resume with some of my qualifications removed, and see what happened. So I did. Today I had my first interview resulting from this “streamlined” resume.

    Interviewers: Selenesmom, we should let you know that we don’t have your resume in front of us, so you should be sure to highlight all the important points. Question One. What are your qualifications to be a budget analyst?

    Selenesmom: I have contributed to the quarterly and annual budgeting process for BigCorp A, BigCorp B and GrowingTrendyCorp C. I have implemented a budgeting process in Hyperion Strategic Finance for GrowingTrendyCorpC as well, partnering with stakeholders and business unit leaders. I have extensive experience in variance analysis and cost analysis. [Breathes] Oh, importantly I began my career as an Eastern Europe specialist, so am comfortable with incomplete information and working in ambiguous environments, and have worked with many governmental, quasi-governmental and multilateral organizations. [Oh, oops, not on this resume.]

    • carlos the dwarf

       /  March 2, 2012

      I’ve started customizing my resume for each job I apply to, and I find what’s very helpful is to spend ten minutes the night before your interview looking over the resume you sent for that position.

      • Dex

         /  March 2, 2012

        So-sign. I cannot stress this enough. Each cover letter and each resume should be specifically tailored to the job ad and/or the company’s website whenever possible. People would be far better off to apply to, say, only 1/4 of the jobs that they’d normally spam, and spend the extra time on customizing for the jobs that are the best fit for their skills.

        • carlosthedwarf

           /  March 2, 2012

          I should add that I don’t have enough on my resume to make big changes to each one, but there are little things I do. I also make a point of specifically addressing in my cover letter why I want to work for that particular company. I figure that it makes my application stand out, and that if I don’t have a good reason for wanting to work there, I shouldn’t be applying to work at that company. [On that last point, it really helps that I have a part-time job that covers my basic expenses--the security that provides lessens my sense of panic and allows me to feel like I'm not slacking if I only get one or two applications out each week.]

  13. dmf

     /  March 2, 2012

    for fridays and sneak previews of spring:

    Rain-glaze on snow. Mud and ice and snow.
    Coyotes feed themselves on gaunt dreams of spring. Then
    what comes slowly suddenly he sees.

    Light hovers longer in the southern sky.
    Brooks uncover themselves. Alders redden.
    Grosbeaks’ beaks turn green. Chickadee finds the song
    he lost last November, and blue jay abandons
    argument and gluttony. He cranes his neck,
    bobs his mitered head; he bounces on a naked branch
    crying: Spring!
    But, like all winter’s keepers
    he speaks his dream before
    he sees the fact.
    Did you hear a phoebe?
    And he out again and walking on the earth,
    in the air, in the sun, ankle deep in mud.

    “March” by David Budbil

  14. dmf

     /  March 2, 2012

    http://www.kqed.org/a/forum/R201203021000

    A recent study commissioned by the Girl Scouts found more than a third of girls surveyed between the ages of eight and 17 said they would not feel comfortable trying to be a leader. We look at the so-called gender ambition gap. What can be done to help raise strong and self-confident girls?

    • Look at the harassment and verbal abuse adult women who speak up on the national, media-visible stage get. If you were an insecure 15-year-old girl, would YOU ever want to face down that gauntlet?

      If we collectively showed more respect to women who do have leadership positions, I think the next generation of girls wouldn’t have so much trouble with that self-confidence.

      I mean, obviously I’m generalizing; plenty of women are perfectly well respected and well treated in their leadership roles in business, education, etc. But really prominent women, the ones who end up in politics or otherwise highly visible? Or women who dare to hold roles that involve calling out anyone’s privilege? It’s brutal.

      • watson42

         /  March 2, 2012

        This was an interesting phenomenon for me to experience as I moved up the ladder. When I was younger and more junior, I encountered little harrassment, bias, etc. But the minute I achieved a supervisory role? It was like the 1950s all over again. It only got worse as I got higher up. It’s no wonder my profession has a so-called “leaky pipeline.” It’s fucking tiring justifying one’s existence every damn day, much less trying to lead in that environment.

      • SWNC

         /  March 2, 2012

        Exactly. Heck, Emily’s latest post is about a woman who testified before a Congressional committee and got called a slut on national radio for doing so.

        (And that reluctance to go public plays out in weird ways. A few weeks ago, my husband posted a video of our 3 year old daughter on YouTube. He couldn’t understand when I told him I didn’t want him doing that ever again. He perceives the Internet as a much friendlier place than I do.)

    • MightBeLying

       /  March 2, 2012

      I can’t find the whole study but from the press release I saw I’m surprised they’re not comparing Girl Scouts to non-Girl Scouts. From my experience, being in women-centric atmospheres – I was a Girl Scout from 3rd grade on (got my Gold Award and am a lifetime member) and went to a women’s college – could be an important part of changing attitudes about leadership. While I don’t think I recognized it at the same time, now interacting with others who came from similar but co-ed backgrounds (e.g., small liberal arts colleges very similar in philosophy but with male students) I think it shaped a different worldview. There is something about having women in all of the positions in an organization, and having that be unremarkable, that both shapes expectations of what is possible and helps make the bizarre inequality that exists in a lot of other organizations in the world more transparent.

      • Girl Scout high five. I never did my Gold Award but I was a member from ages 5 through 19 and after I aged out of attending camp, started working at camp. Also got to go on a Wider Op at age 13 that I still think was a phenomenal two weeks.

        And you know, there could be something to what you say. I never had the slightest desire to attend a women’s college, but I’m out there now deliberately in a profession that’s some ludicrous over-90-percentage male, and facing blowback for it. Surely it wasn’t *just* my parents’ influence that set me up for staring down the world…

  15. Craig

     /  March 2, 2012

    Over on the twitter, I saw that you retweeted that Sleep Train is pulling their ads from Rush Limbaugh. I’m glad for any fallout for him, but the part of me that is 11 thinks it’s funny that it’s a mattress company. Anti-sex bullshit is bad for business!

  16. MightBeLying

     /  March 2, 2012

    I. Am going. To Israel. THIS WEEKEND!!!

    I will miss the Horde, but I’ll be back with stories in 2 weeks!

  17. I’m sad because TNC closed a thread yesterday, and I really wanted to respond to the guy who said something along the lines of “But Sandra Fluke is someone’s daughter.” And although the guy followed up with nice words about his kids, and I get that, because I love my kid like hell, too…

    It pisses me off. It’s the very definition of paternalism. Sandra Fluke doesn’t deserve anything because she’s somebody’s daughter, but rather because SHE is SOMEBODY all on her own.

    Whew. I needed to get that off my chest.

    • chingona

       /  March 2, 2012

      Agreed!

    • FWIW, I think it’s along the lines of “I know you are oblivious to the overall effect, but at least start from here: she’s someone’s daughter. Then we can work you up to understanding that she’s someone herself.”

      It’s not a perfect place to start – but it can get the conversation started. Empathy, then understanding.

      • neighbors73

         /  March 2, 2012

        I’m sure if I was actually able to post in the actual thread, I might have wordsmithed a bit more. After a day of sitting on it, it’s coming from a different place.

    • scone

       /  March 2, 2012

      That frustrated me, too.

  18. chingona

     /  March 2, 2012

    I was pretty antsy this morning for TNC to reopen the Limbaugh/slut thread as I really wanted to respond to JohnMac, and I suspect he won’t see it here, but I have to get it off my chest.

    Female Georgetown law students pay just as much in tuition and just as much for student insurance as their male counterparts. They are entitled to the same benefits: Full coverage for all preventative care. But this isn’t just about Georgetown law students. It’s also about the nurse’s aide who makes $12 an hour at a Catholic hospital and already has three kids and whose doctor has told her another pregnancy could be dangerous. Yeah, she could go to PP, but she works just as hard as her male co-workers and pays just as much in health insurance premiums. He doesn’t have to go to the county clinic for his blood pressure meds. Why should she have to go outside her normal provider for a basic need? But she couldn’t go testify in Congress. Couldn’t get child care. Couldn’t afford to take time off work. (Sympathetic enough?) So Sandra Fluke testified instead, for all of us. The Catholic Church has a deeply held principle? So do we: That women should be treated equally under the law and equally in matters of employment, that women’s health and lives matters just as much men’s.

    • chingona

       /  March 2, 2012

      This was the guy who said Rush was over the line, but “that said,” we shouldn’t be too sympathetic to Sandra Fluke because she chose to go to an expensive Catholic school and probably has money.

      • socioprof

         /  March 2, 2012

        Negating the fact that she is there on scholarship. Negating the fact that birth control should not be a privilege of the privileged. That series of posts had me so pissed last night.

      • Considering how expensive college is today, you can have $80,000 in scholarships or loans and STILL be struggling to make ends meet. Especially living in an area like Northern Virginia/DC Metro/Maryland where the Cost-Of-Living is high.

    • neighbors73

       /  March 2, 2012

      I am so glad I’m not the only one who had unfinished business in that thread. I thought about that guy a lot, too.

      • by the end, i was mostly thinking about how fun it is to see craig light into someone. guy can hit hard.

        • neighbors73

           /  March 2, 2012

          Oh yes. I quite enjoyed that.

          Of course, as a man, Craig’s *allowed* to hit hard, where I have to be empathetic first.

          • chingona

             /  March 2, 2012

            Craig’s comments were my consolation for not being able to say anything myself.

          • bah. empathy? you must be a teacher or something. ;)

            just pretend the other person is attacking one of your students (or is one of your students, depending on the moment), and let the rage box be opened.

          • Dex

             /  March 2, 2012

            Do you feel like it’s that way at TNC’s or is that something else? I feel like some of our hardest hitters are women. I mean, some of us guys are insufferable boors, but I live in mortal fear of being smacked by some of our female posters at least as much as the male ones.

            • I have the feeling that only grace and poise keep Emily from a truly significant smackdown.

            • Dex

               /  March 2, 2012

              (btw, I include myself as one of those insufferable boors)

            • I actually feel that I can be an asshole pretty much wherever if needed, but in this particular case I was sending a jab Stephen Matlock’s way for his suggestion up above.

              That being said, what I loved about Craig yesterday was how QUICK he was. Sometimes, it takes me a while to figure out how to reply, and then the moment is loss. What he did to that guy yesterday was masterful, and i”m only sad that the thread got closed because I wanted to pile on.

              • the moment is LOST. Gah. I like to blame the elves, but at least they have an edit function!

          • I laughed pretty hard at that one, neighbor.

            Am I a bad person for that?

          • Ian

             /  March 2, 2012

            k___bee does not mince words:

            http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/02/fighting-breaks-out-between-atlantic-voices/253175/#comment-440971336

            But that’s just one fun example from an unlimited supply of comments, written by women, that rightfully do not put empathy first.

            And honestly, I don’t think I would have stuck around at Coates’ blog if it weren’t like that. Once I made the point in another comments section that it was just a bunch of guys arguing, and everybody attacked me for it, but only one commenter spoke up and said “I’m a woman.” Because it really was almost entirely guys. Which does not make for an interesting environment.

            • Ian

               /  March 2, 2012

              Ha. I look like an idiot because I did not read the whole thread.

        • Dex

           /  March 2, 2012

          Totally agreed. If TNC had had an open thread, I was going to acknowledge the ruthless efficiency with which he mowed that guy down.

        • Wow, I’m glad everyone enjoyed that. Sometimes I choose to use my powers for good, and sometimes I choose to use my powers for awesome.

          • It was a thing of beauty. Really.

          • Darth Thulhu

             /  March 2, 2012

            When given the choice of how to use your powers, choose awesome!

            • Sometimes when I use my powers for awesome, people get hurt. Like right now, I think I will put them back in their sheath rather than bash someone’s brains in.

              • Darth Thulhu

                 /  March 4, 2012

                You are so thoughtfuland responsible in how you use your powers!

                Which is, of course, also awesome

  19. Ian

     /  March 2, 2012

    If anyone was ever saved by the bell it was that guy.

  20. Going to Luxembourg in a week. Don’t miss me too much.

    DID I MENTION I’M GOING TO LUXEMBOURG? FOR A WEEK?

    • Dex

       /  March 2, 2012

      Woo woo! Work or pleasure?

      • Both – work, but this is my second time, and this time I won’t be so flummoxed by my hotel. This time I’m staying in the center of town (Parc Bellevue) rather than out in the business district where there’s nothing at night (Novotel).

        Let me just say this – I’ve had the absolute best French food in Luxembourg. Now I understand why people rave about that style of cooking.

    • Bookwoman

       /  March 2, 2012

      And bon voyage to you too!

    • Um, that’s the speed trap between Belgium and Germany, right?

      • Captain_Button

         /  March 2, 2012

        I changed trains in Luxemburg once.

        Once.

    • O_O

      Soooooooooooooo jealous!

    • Ian

       /  March 2, 2012

      Many of my grandfather’s wartime letters were sent from Luxembourg. They were only allowed to identify the country they were in, so they’re all addressed from “Somewhere in Luxembourg.” Which is funny, given its size.

  21. carlosthedwarf

     /  March 2, 2012

    Today in good news:
    I get to meet Danny Meyer on Monday!!! [PS: if anyone has good info on the guy that a check of his website/wikipedia can't tell me, I could really use it. I'd like to impress the shit out of him.]

  22. Going to the USF-West Virginia basketball game Saturday afternoon. One of the biggest b-ball games in school history, as a Masters grad alum I gotta represent.

    Afterwards, I expect ALL of you to log onto Star Wars The Old Republic and join me in battling the evil Sith Empire on Namaadi Corridor… it’s been ages since I’ve seen any of you there… :sigh:

  23. David L

     /  March 2, 2012

    Alcohol is allowed in the student lounge, right? I need a drink.

    I had an exhausting all-afternoon meeting, in which I made one of those easily forgotten but hella embarrassing errors (put the wrong version of a file on the server.)

    Then, when I posted on Facebook that tonight’s agenda included booze and junk food, a guy who keeps acting like he’s interested in me but has played the “not now but maybe later” game enough times that I’ve given up pursuing him, texts me and makes suggestive comments about getting drunk at his place, but that’s 45 minutes away and I don’t feel like driving so this time I play the “not now but maybe later” game. I feel like he’d actually make pretty good boyfriend material once he gets past being 21 and newly out of the closet, with all of the baggage and immaturity that entails.

    And, as I was typing this out, the cat tried to steal my Cheetos.

    • Ian

       /  March 2, 2012

      Cats like Cheetos?

      • David L

         /  March 2, 2012

        He likes real cheese, so why not bright orange cheese-like substances?

        • wearyvoter

           /  March 2, 2012

          Cheetos are why I have a silicone keyboard cover for my computer. Sometimes there’s nothing quite like a snack that’s a shade of orange that doesn’t occur in nature.

          • Ian

             /  March 2, 2012

            Some birds and flowers are Cheeto-colored. Also lava.

      • One of my cats (Clinton) likes goldfish crackers and cheez-its. And fried chicken.

  24. This needs to be said:

  25. wearyvoter

     /  March 2, 2012

    So, during a late-evening trip to the grocery store, the spousal unit and I spotted a few packages of chocolate-covered matzohs in the Passover foodstuffs display. Actually, what I look for this time of year is the kosher Coca-Cola. (Sweetened with cane sugar instead of corn syrup.)

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